GOALS GIVE GAOTH DOBHAIR COUNTY SENIOR RESERVE TITLE

first_imgGAOTH Dobhair are county senior reserve champions after a six point win over Naomh Conaill at MacCumhaill Park today.And it was goals which made the difference as gaeltacht club won by 2-06 to 0-06.Mairtín Ó Colla agus Ryan Ó Fearraigh were the goal scorers in the curtain raiser to the county final which also saw N Conaill’s Joe Kennedy red-carded 15 minutes from the end. There were few scores in the first half with the sides level at 0-03 each at the break.But Stephen Cassidy pointed to put Gaoth Dobhair ahead and they never lost the lead after that.Naomh Conaill did close the gap, but Ferry pointed and then netted to give his side the title.  GOALS GIVE GAOTH DOBHAIR COUNTY SENIOR RESERVE TITLE was last modified: October 20th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:GOALS GIVE GAOTH DOBHAIR COUNTY SENIOR RESERVE TITLElast_img read more

Three things every IoT manufacturer should do to improve security

first_imgWhy IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Related Posts There’s no question that the Internet of Things is the new security battleground. Internet-connected webcams, HVAC systems, cars, TVs, watches, printers and more are giving people more use out of their devices. But these devices also open doors to hackers who want to steal corporate data, lasso thousands of devices into botnets that can launch DDoS attacks, or even set off Dallas’ 156 emergency outdoor sirens.See also: Will these Chinese satellites provide hack-proof data security?When it comes to security, corporations are struggling to keep up with the speed at which problems evolve. For example, a researcher with Google Project Zero recently discovered a flaw in Broadcom Wi-Fi chips that could allow someone to remotely execute code on affected iPhones, Nexuses and Samsung devices just by being in their general vicinity. Another researcher found 40 zero-day vulnerabilities in Samsung’s Tizen operating system for smart watches, phones, and TVs —  he said the code may have been the worst he’s ever seen. Meanwhile, a new version of the Mirai botnet was recently discovered to be capable of launching application layer attack, not just DDoSing websites, and turning large swaths of the internet dark.To combat these issues, companies are constantly inventing new solutions. For example, a new Microsoft project, dubbed Sopris, is aimed at solving some security issues with IoT by redesigning Wi-Fi microcontrollers. And while efforts like this help, more must be done within corporations to address the IoT security problem in a scalable way. How? Here are three things companies making IoT devices should do to improve the security of their products:#1: Be accountableMany companies developing IoT products aren’t technology companies, so they don’t necessarily design products with security in mind, or know the best practices to ensure security. Vendors getting into the IoT market must realize that their devices will have vulnerabilities and that connecting them to the internet increases the likelihood the devices will be attacked or used in attacks. If companies sell products without acknowledging this reality, they have already failed, and are putting not just their customers at risk, but the internet as a whole.#2: Automatically updateProducts that don’t have a way to automatically update are sitting ducks. For instance, the moment they left store shelves, devices vulnerable to the Mirai botnet were effectively at the end of their life — there was no way to update the devices or to fix the vulnerabilities, so the only option owners of affected devices had was to buy a new device. Device recalls are expensive, so providing a way to update the device is essential in avoiding instant obsolescence, which turns customers off. Even Windows XP, which had a 10-year life cycle, shipped security patches to customers to install manually. Microsoft planned for customer support and maintenance, like employing more security engineers, over the long run and factored that into the upfront costs or subscription. In the same vein, Nest charges $10 a month for upkeep services, which enables it to make one of the most secure IoT devices on the market.#3: Embrace disclosureIoT device manufacturers must also make it easy for ethical hackers to report vulnerabilities to them. Companies should have a vulnerability disclosure process with an easy-to-find email address or web form to which to send bug reports. If they want to encourage more security scrutiny to help them find and fix bugs, companies can also set up a bug bounty program that compensates hackers for reporting vulnerabilities. No product is immune to bugs, and given how widespread IoT devices have become, and how vulnerable they are to hacking, it’s essential for companies that make IoT devices to take all the precautions necessary to ensure that people’s privacy is as protected as possible. Co-founder of HackerOne How Data Analytics Can Save Lives AI: How it’s Impacting Surveillance Data Storage Tags:#Big Data#cybersecurity#data security#Internet of Things#IoT Follow the Puck Michiel Prinslast_img read more

13 U-23 players summoned for camp ahead of football friendly against China

first_imgNew Delhi, Oct 6 (PTI) Thirteen U-23 players who were part of the Indian squad in the recent SAFF Cup have been summoned by head coach Stephen Constantine for a national camp here as part of the team’s preparation for the international friendly against China this month. India are slated to play China on October 13 at the Suzhou Olympic Sports Centre Stadium, the first time the national senior team is travelling to that country to play an international match. The two countries last met in the Nehru Cup in Kochi way back in 1997. The 29 probables will assemble in the Capital for a 2-day camp before they leave for China on October 10. In order to prepare for the forthcoming AFC Asian Cup UAE 2019, India are playing a few international friendly matches in the coming months and the coach has said “these are the kind of games we need”. “China are a strong team and the match will be a tough test for us. But we need to play these sort of games right now. Getting to play under pressure is important and an away fixture in China is exactly the kind of game we need,” he stated. “Hopefully everyone stays free from injury as it’s going to be an important game for the build-up to the AFC Asian Cup in January.” The Probables: Goalkeepers: Gurpreet Singh Sandhu, Vishal Kaith, Amrinder Singh, Karanjeet Singh. Defenders: Pritam Kotal, Sarthak Golui, Sandesh Jhingan, Anas Edathodika, Salam Ranjan Singh, Subhasish Bose, Narayan Das. Midfielders: Udanta Singh, Nikhil Poojary, Pronay Halder, Rowllin Borges, Germanpreet Singh, Anirudh Thapa, Souvik Chakraborti, Vinit Rai, HalicharanNarzary, Bikash Jairu, Ashique Kuruniyan, Lallianzuala Chhangte.advertisement Forwards: Sunil Chhetri, Jeje Lalpekhlua, Balwant Singh, Sumeet Passi, Manvir Singh, Farukh Choudhary. PTI PDS PDSPDSlast_img read more

Must see: Fabulous guide to visual storytelling

first_imgResource Media has a fantastic and free guide to visual storytelling. It’s a MUST read (see) for your cause.The guide has great tips like:1. Always test visuals2. Pair visuals with words to increase retention of your message3. Shun bad stock photosThere are great examples, checklists and templates. Get the guide here.(Thanks to Mark Rovner (read his blog) for tipping me off to the guide. I feel the way he does – I wish I’d written it myself!)last_img

5 Things to Do After Your Big Giving Day

first_imgAfter a monster giving day, you may want to just spend a week recovering from all the work and excitement of the event. That said, the real opportunity lies not just in the donations and new donors acquired on the day itself, but rather in the long-term potential of these supporters. Here are five things to do that will help you harness the momentum of your giving day: 1. Get out the thank you. If you haven’t yet, send that thank you ASAP. 2. Examine donor information and behavior. Do these donors look different than your normal annual fund supporters? Did your existing donors give in new ways? Analyzing these details will help you understand how giving days fit into your overall fundraising strategy.3. Determine which methods resulted in the most support. Look at your promotional efforts and rate how they performed. If you had supporters and volunteers helping to raise funds, pinpoint who had the most influence and be sure to cultivate them as champions of your work.4. Have a special orientation plan for donors you acquired during your giving day. It’s likely that these new donors aren’t as familiar with your organization as other prospects. Create a welcome series to introduce your work and let these new supporters know why your community is so special.5. View this webinar. While vital, perfecting the art of donor relationships isn’t easy. This on-demand webinar presentation features the Donor Relations Guru herself, Lynne Wester, who offers tips that will help you think through your communications and stewardship plans.last_img read more

Create a Style Guide That’s Useful and Used (Part Two)

first_imgRead Part OneUse this Start-to-Finish Checklist to Build a Useful GuideIdentify your Consistency Czar—the person on your team in charge of creating and managing the style guide. Your czar should be a content expert, good listener, and diplomatic powerhouse. She is the single person who will answer questions and make yes or no usage decisions. The czar will update the style guide to include responses to frequently asked questions and revise existing standards (or the coverage thereof) as needed.Enlist relevant colleagues as guide helpers and users right up front. Make sure you let colleagues who write, review and revise, or use content know what you’re up to. Position the guide as a tool that will save them time and effort (less revision) and increase campaign effectiveness. Ask for their input as needed in the development process and as users.Collect what you do now (editorial, graphic, and brand habits) and relevant examples from other organizations. Include pages printed in color from your website, e-news, blog, Facebook page and other social channels, and online fundraising campaigns, as well as print materials.Review your samples. Spread them out in front of you or pin them to a bulletin board. Scan or photograph hard-copy samples, and upload everything to a Pinterest board for easy sharing with colleagues and to build an archive of your process and options. Select the standards that work best in each editorial guideline category and each graphic guideline category. Start by removing items, colors, and styles that clearly don’t fit your organization’s brand or personality. Next, review the remaining elements to remove any that are inconsistent with the core approach you see developing.Get input on your draft from colleagues and external audiences, if possible. Solicit feedback from your colleagues who create and/or count on effective communications. Your outreach will double to build buy-in, which will increase the probability they’ll use the style guide. Once complete, run an abbreviated draft by your marketing advisory group, composed of supporters who are willing to give you five to 10 minutes monthly, since your prospects and supporters matter most!Finalize your standards and write them in clear, succinct language, illustrated with examples.9 Steps to Getting Buy-In for Your Style GuideYour style guide, no matter how clear and thorough, is worth absolutely nothing if it’s not used. Here’s how to make sure it’s used correctly, frequently, and as happily as possible.Make your style guide:Searchable. Whether you produce your guide as a Word doc, PDF, or simple website (see this example from the Alzheimer’s Society in the UK), make sure it’s easy for users to quickly search for and find what they need.Easy to use while writing. Many of your writers and designers will want to have the style guide open in front of them as they work, either in a separate window while they’re writing in Word or in hard copy (there are still some die-hard paper fans). Test the guide to make sure it’s usable this way.Available in hard copy or formatted to print in a flash. Some folks—especially those who create a lot of content for your organization—will want to browse the guide, which they might find easier in print.Integrated into your authoring platform. There’s nothing easier for writers than having standards built right into their authoring tool, whether it’s Word or your organization’s content management system. You can set your tool to highlight words, phrases, or grammar usage that aren’t in your standards or to automatically style font sizes and colors of headlines and subheads.Quick to edit and update. The more current and relevant your style guide, the more likely it’ll be used. On the other hand, if users see lots of outdated elements, errors, or gaps, they’ll stay away.A simple website format can be the easiest to update and distribute.Train and support your colleagues in using the style guide.You’ve already taken the first steps in updating relevant colleagues on the guide, soliciting input on your draft and asking them to use it ahead of release (stressing its value to them), and welcoming some of them into the guide development review process.Your guide launch is a perfect time to train your colleagues in its use. You can do this in person, via video (great for multiple sites), or over the phone. I recommend you train the key department representatives and make them “keepers of the guide,” rather than training everyone. Whatever training approach you take, also outline this info in the guide as an ongoing reference.Feature:The WIIFM—“What’s in it for me?” This is the value for your colleagues of using the guide).Who should use the style guide and how. Illustrate your vision with several concrete scenarios, ideally those that frequently occur and that most colleagues are familiar with.Contacts and the process for questions, revisions, and updates.A huge thanks!Useful Models: Nonprofit Style GuidesThese models range from the Audubon Institute’s one-pager, which might be enough for your organization, to the mammoth Rutgers University style guide. The more complex your organization, programs or services, and audiences, the more in-depth you’ll need to make your style guide.Consider contacting your communications colleagues at these organizations to learn more about the development and use of these guides: Read Part OneDoes your organization currently have a style guide, including editorial and/or visual standards? If so, please share the link and/or how the guide has helped (or not). Editorial Style GuideVisual Identity Manual Audubon InstituteCommunity Partnership for Arts and CultureCPAC Brand GuidelinesCPAC Style Guidelines Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Editorial Style GuideNational Association for Music Education Style GuideRutgers Universitylast_img read more

Addressing Knowledge Gaps: Plasmodium Vivax Infection in Pregnancy

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 6, 2012June 16, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of a blog series on Malaria in Pregnancy. To view the entire series, click here. A couple of months ago, I had the chance to meet again with the members of the Plasmodium Vivax Infection in Pregnancy (PregVax) Consortium in Dehli, India– a country that contributes to nearly 80% of the malaria cases in Southeast Asia. P.vivax is the most common of human malaria species and causes up to 80 million cases annually with the majority occurring in Asia and the Western Pacific, Central and South America and the Middle East.The PregVax Consortium started back in 2008 to address the knowledge gaps in P. vivax infection in pregnancy. Approximately 25 million pregnant women exposed yearly to malaria live in areas where P. vivax is endemic. While the effects of P. falciparum malaria in pregnancy have been well characterised and are responsible for considerable maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, surprisingly little is known about the impact of P. vivax infection during gestation.The PregVax project is a cohort observational study of pregnant women from five P. vivax endemic countries (Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, India and Papua New Guinea) that represent most of the world’s P. vivax infections. It aims to describe the epidemiological and clinical features of P.vivax malaria in pregnancy. Compiling this information in a methodologically standardized way is essential to describe the impact of P. vivax malaria in pregnancy. In addition, the project has been working to determine whether there are pregnancy specific P. vivax immune responses and characterize genotypically and phenotypically the parasites of the placenta. In an unprecedented effort, almost 10,000 pregnant women have been enrolled at the different project sites during their routine antenatal care visits and followed-up at the health facility until delivery or end of pregnancy.More accurate data of vivax malaria during gestation are essential to improve its clinical management and to guide control policies. Furthermore, elucidating the mechanisms involved in the pathology of P. vivax in pregnancy will help to develop specific control tools such as more effective drugs and vaccines.Although P. falciparum is the most deadly species and the subject of most malaria-related research and literature, more attention should be given to P. vivax. Furthermore, understanding the mechanism involved in P. vivax malaria may also help to elucidate important gaps in the knowledge of P. facilparum infection in pregnancy.Coordinating the PregVax project  is challenging because of the ambitious objectives and the large cohort size. In fact, this is the first study of this kind in this area. As we are reaching the final stages of the PregVax project, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the European Commission whose research program, 7th Framework Program, made Malaria in Pregnancy one of its priorities and our consortium partners together with our collaborators from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the University of Melbourne. I left Dehli with the sense that we are making progress as we gain insight on critical aspects of this issue. Results will soon be shared with the scientific community.P. vivax was usually considered to be the benign malaria. However, its infection often leads to severe disease–and quality of life and productivity are negatively affected. Absenteeism from work and school and the anaemia that this disease leads to hampers the development of endemic areas. The economic impact of P. vivax malaria mandates that more resources be allocated specifically to research on this parasite.I think I can speak for everyone at the PregVax Consortium when I say that we look forward to assisting in any way that we can to achieve this vision.Prof. Clara Menéndez leads the Maternal, Child and Reproductive Health Initiative at the Barcelona Institute for Global Health and is the PregVax Consortium Co-ordinator.Share this:last_img read more

Economic Consequences at the Household Level of Maternal Complications in Bangladesh

first_imgPosted on May 30, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Colleagues at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research in Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) recently published a paper, Costs of Maternal Health-related Complications in Bangladesh, in the Journal of Health, Population, and Nutrition that explores the economic repercussions on households of maternal complications in a rural setting in Bangladesh.Abstract:This paper assesses both out-of-pocket payments for healthcare and losses of productivity over six months postpartum among women who gave birth in Matlab, Bangladesh. The hypothesis of the study objective is that obstetric morbidity leads women to seek care at which time out-of-pocket expenditure is incurred. Second, a woman may also take time out from employment or from doing her household chores. This loss of resources places a financial burden on the household that may lead to reduced consumption of usual but less important goods and use of other services depending on the extent to which a household copes up by using savings, taking loans, and selling assets. Women were divided into three groups based on their morbidity patterns: (a) women with a severe obstetric complication (n=92); (b) women with a less-severe obstetric complication (n=127); and (c) women with a normal delivery (n=483). Data were collected from households of these women at two time-points—at six weeks and six months after delivery. The results showed that maternal morbidity led to a considerable loss of resources up to six weeks postpartum, with the greatest financial burden of cost of healthcare among the poorest households. However, families coped up with loss of resources by taking loans and selling assets, and by the end of six months postpartum, the households had paid back more than 40% of the loans.Read the full paper here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more