IT WOULD BE AN HONOR, HOWEVER…

first_imgIT WOULD BE AN HONOR, HOWEVER Gavel Gamut By Jim RedwinePeg and I and several members of the Redwine family were fortunate to have been included in last week’s New Harmony, Indiana Fourth of July Celebration. It was a community effort with fine music, an excellent reading of the Declaration of Independence by our friend and neighbor Chuck Minnette and copious amounts of hot dogs and ice cream. I was honored to be included as a speaker.Reporter and photographer Lois Mittino Gray of the Posey County News did an excellent job of capturing the essence of America’s Birthday celebration and I truly appreciated her kind remarks. I also understand how someone named Redwine who was born on the Osage Indian Nation in Pawhuska, Oklahoma and who wore an Osage inspired patriotic vest could be assumed to be a member of the great Osage Tribe. While such an honor would be a source of great pride for me, alas, while I have numerous Osage, and other Indian tribe friends, I am not a tribal member.Growing up in Osage County I played sports with and against Osages. I attended church and public schools with Osages. I count Osages among my best friends and treasure our memories and current relationships. I have always felt accepted and respected as a friend, teammate, schoolmate and competitor by my Osage friends. But the great privilege of being an actual Osage must remain in the realm of desire, not reality.Gentle Reader, should you wish to encounter a culture where the Osage Tribe and several other justly proud Indian peoples will welcome you as they always have me and my family, I recommend you plan an excursion to Pawhuska, Oklahoma. You will find buffalo (bison), miles of virgin prairie on the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, the Osage Tribal Museum, the Osage County Historical Museum, Woolaroc Museum, cowboys of the non-drugstore type, rodeos and the Pioneer Woman’s Mercantile among just some of the fun and enriching things to experience. You may even encounter Peg and me and other members of the Redwine family as Osage County and Pawhuska may not officially designate us as Osage, but we all have always proudly claimed the culture and heritage of that special place.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to www.jamesmredwine.comOr “Like” us on Facebook at JPegRanchBooks&KnittingFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Cricket News MS Dhoni’s fifty in Sydney ODI vs Australia criticised by former players, social media

first_imgJust awful umpiring 😐— Jiya 🏏 (@jiyaasahni) January 12, 2019 New Delhi: MS Dhoni had struggled in ODIs in 2018, failing to get a big score. His finishing prowess was also on the wane and there was mounting pressure on him as his strike-rate had also fallen. In the ODI against Australia in Sydney, Dhoni started off in style by scoring his 68th fifty. However, he was subject to immense criticism for his slow approach. He had taken eight balls to get off the mark and he had made just six runs in 35 balls. Although he broke the shackles with a six off Lyon, the strike-rate of Dhoni barely went over 50. When he was dismissed for 51 thanks to an umpiring blunder and because Ambati Rayudu had extinguished the only review for India, it left Virat Kohli’s side with too much to do.With the asking rate climbing to over 10, Rohit Sharma kept India in the hunt with his magnificent century, his seventh against Australia but once he fell for 133, India just capitulated and they lost the match by 34 runs to trail 0-1 in the three-match series. Dhoni’s knock was subject to plenty of criticism from social media, with many calling it a ‘great Test innings’ in an ODI match. Here are some of the tweets. Read More | Lucky to have gotten MS Dhoni’s wicket: Jhye Richardson I don’t think there’s anything new to be learnt about Dhoni. He’s not the player he used to be. But, more importantly, ODI cricket has moved on from when he was at his best. Tendulkar had this great ability to keep up as the game advanced. Dhoni hasn’t got that extreme ability.— cricketingview (@cricketingview) January 12, 2019 For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.center_img A howler that even the commentators couldn’t predict in normal time.— D_le _’Neil (@Don579) January 12, 2019 In 2018, Dhoni has been criticised for batting too slowly and for not attacking the spinners. One hopes that in the next 12 ODIs before the World Cup, Dhoni has a chance to iron out some of the flaws that have crept in his batting. With Rohit Sharma also backing Dhoni to be India’s natural number four, the former India skipper could head into the next game in Adelaide high on confidence. It would’ve been better if MS Dhoni retired from limited Overs cricket instead Test Cricket.— Mufaddal Vohra (@mufaddal_vohra) January 12, 2019Ajit Agarkar, former India pace bowler, while speaking to ESPNCricinfo, had also criticised Dhoni’s knock, saying it left Rohit with plenty to do. “Rohit can get 288 all by himself. There has to be a support from the other end. And not from someone who is striking at 50 when he finishes after 100 balls. And, 100 balls are a lot of deliveries in one-day cricket,” Agarkar said.Dhoni controversial dismissalWith Dhoni on 51 and the partnership with Rohit nearing 150, India seemed to be on course but Behrendorff trapped Dhoni LBW. However, replays showed that the ball had pitched outside the line of leg stump. However, with Rayudu having used the review, Dhoni had no choice but to be walk immediately and this proved to be a major turning point. The LBW decision sparked plenty of fire against the umpire, with many terming it an umpiring blunder.Read More | Shubman Gill – From U19 World Cup winner to India team selectionlast_img read more

13 championship events for Gibson McCook Relays

first_imgThe prestigious and exciting Gibson McCook Relays, slated for Saturday, February 27, will see the 4×200 metres Girls’ Open and the 4×200 metres for Class One and Two boys upgraded to championship events.These events will be part of a stellar cast of 13 mouthwatering championship showpieces inside what is expected to be a jam-packed National Stadium.The three events have been added by the organisers due to their prominence at the IAAF World Relays in recent years.Local appliance and furniture retail franchise Singer expressed delight with being drawn as sponsor of the 4x100m Institution Men’s Championship race, an event that could see Racers Track Club kingpins Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake, and other members of their institution square off against other top-level challengers.Besides Singer, 12 other championship marquee event sponsors were named last Thursday at the Knutsford Court Hotel in New Kingston, ahead of the Gibson McCook Relays’ 40th staging.Advanced Scales and Equipment snapped up the 4x100m high school boys’ Class One Championship, while the 4x100m High School Girls’ Under-19 Championship will be sponsored by Consumer Brand (Oral B).Beverage brand Lucozade will sponsor the 4x100m High School Boys Class Two Championship, while for the girls, Wisynco will sponsor the 4x100m High School Under-17.EVENT SPONSORSThe 4x400m High School Boys’ Open went to SOS Foods Limited and the girls’ equivalent went to CIBC First Caribbean International Bank, while Grace Foods will be the sponsor of the 4x400m Institution Men’s Championship.The 4x400m Institution Men’s Championship will be sponsored by Grace Foods, 4x400m High Schoolgirl’s Open by CIBC First Caribbean, and the 4x400m High School Boys’ Open sponsored by SOS Foods.Jamaica Biscuit Company and Consumer Brands (Head and Shoulders) selected the Boys and Girls’ High School 4x800m Open, respectively.There were 42 sponsored events for the Gibson McCook Relays, which is one of the most prestigious relay meets in the world.It began in 1976 in honour of Kingston College founder Bishop Percival Gibson and was later renamed after Neville ‘Teddy’ McCook.last_img read more

BlackBerry 6 Preview Features Social Feeds and New Browser

first_imgCognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Here’s some of what’s new in BlackBerry 6:A social network aggregator that’s shown to work with Facebook, Twitter and BlackBerry Messenger. It’s unclear if it will support other services. Integrating services such as Yammer and StatusNet would be useful for the enterprise. This is probably based on Viigo, which RIM acquired in March. Viigo, a real-time information aggregator, added support for Facebook last year.An RSS reader, probably also based on Viigo.A new home screen design, and what appears to be a native “Today” theme.The much anticipated new WebKit-based browser, which will add, among other things, tabbed browsing. We looked at what may be in store for the browser here/Universal search.Context-sensitive pop-up menus.RIM released a previous video of the new OS in April.RIM has long dominated the enterprise smart phone market, but the iPhone and Android are challenging RIM’s position. Software such as Sybase‘s Afaria help bring other platforms up to BlackBerry’s level enterprise readyness, so it’s exciting to see that RIM isn’t resting on its laurels anymore. However, this round of improvements only helps bring RIM in line with other smart phones for web and social media experience – it doesn’t look like it’s going to break any new ground. And it does nothing to improve the condition of the rather spare BlackBerry app store.RIM also announced today that it’s making its enterprise-level BlackBerry security features available to consumers and small business users. Tags:#enterprise#mobile#news#Products IT + Project Management: A Love Affair 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now klint finley RIM has released a video preview of the company’s forth coming BlackBerry 6 OS. The preview showcases a touch based interface, new social features likely powered by technology RIM acquired from Viigo and, of course, a new WebKit based browser. The video, and more information, is after the jump. Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Related Posts last_img read more

Three Holiday Fundraising Clichés to Avoid

first_imgPutting a snowman on it. (Or reindeer. Or fir trees.): Unless you are actually working to save snowmen, reindeer, fir trees — or any other emblem of the winter holidays, avoid featuring any of these as the star of your fundraising appeal. The best use of an image is showing me a real photo of the people or animals my donation will help. Bonus: Avoiding the traditional clip art will also help your appeals stand out from the crowd! At the risk of being a Scrooge myself, here are three holiday fundraising pet peeves that I hope to see less often this year: Photo Source: Big Stock Photo Making me feel guilty about my daily coffee: The classic line of forgoing a daily latte to make a donation is often used to illustrate how easy it can be to find a way to give a little and have it add up to a lot. However, the world is certainly not going to be a better place if I skip my coffee (trust me), and I want to be inspired to give, not guilted. Let me give my donation in a happy, caffeinated state and leave Starbucks (and guilt) out of it.center_img Year-end fundraising season is here and I’m seeing a steady stream of fundraising appeals arrive in the mail and in my inbox. As sure as I can count on receiving Aunt Nancy’s 3-page (front and back) annual family newsletter, there are a few themes that always seem to creep into the mix of these donation requests. Using too many shopping metaphors. Unless you can clearly tie the idea of shopping to giving the gift of charity, specific impact levels or a holiday giving catalog, as done very successfully by Heifer International or even Network for Good’s own Good Cards, consider leaving the shopping to the mall. Giving a donation is a highly personal and emotional act; don’t take me out of the moment by overusing phrases like: “buy now”, “holiday shopping” and “shopping list”.Your best bet to get me to donate to your cause in December? Tell a great story, stick to the point and clearly tell me what I can do to help. Happy fundraising!last_img read more

Must see: Fabulous guide to visual storytelling

first_imgResource Media has a fantastic and free guide to visual storytelling. It’s a MUST read (see) for your cause.The guide has great tips like:1. Always test visuals2. Pair visuals with words to increase retention of your message3. Shun bad stock photosThere are great examples, checklists and templates. Get the guide here.(Thanks to Mark Rovner (read his blog) for tipping me off to the guide. I feel the way he does – I wish I’d written it myself!)last_img

Laying a Good Foundation: Quick Wins for Nonprofit Marketing

first_imgLaying a great foundation for the expansion of your nonprofit’s marketing and donation efforts can help you find success now while planning long-term goals. Below is a list of priorities to help you focus your time and maximize your impact ASAP.Photo from Flickr member one tiny sparkThanking donors creatively is one of the short-term priorities you can focus on now. Consider sending thank you notes from volunteers, community members, or a person who was directly impacted by their donation. 1.    Nonprofit Website Can website visitors find your donation page in 2 seconds or less? Donation buttons should be big, bold, and above the fold.Is it easy to follow you on Twitter, like you on Facebook, and sign up for your email newsletter? Give your potential donors the opportunity to take the first step in forming a relationship with you. If they aren’t ready to give today, make it easy for them to find out more about your work.Make sure your home page has a compelling image and a statement that connects your visitors to your cause. If a stranger can’t identify what your organization does as soon as they land on your homepage, you’re missing out on an opportunity to tell your story (and a possible donation)!2.    Online Donation Page Do you have a clear call to action on your donation page (donate now!)?Is your online donation form easy to complete? If your donation page has too many fields to fill out it’s likely that donors will leave the page without making a donation.Don’t confuse donors by redirecting them to a donation  page that looks different than your website. Make sure your brand is consistent.3.    Email Lists Is there a way for website visitors to sign up for your newsletter on your homepage? What about every other page on your website?Does your email list sign up form make it clear how frequently subscribers will hear from you? Don’t promise something you can’t deliver (or send emails too frequently).Are you collecting email addresses from everyone who attends your events? Give them the option to be added to your list.Include forward to a friend and social sharing links in all your messages. Current subscribers can help you build your email list, make it easy for them to help you!4.    Email Marketing Does your subject line entice readers? Those 8 to 10 words are the most important part of the message. Make sure the subject line is clear, conscience, and compelling.Is your email layout easy on the eyes? Make sure you keep the style simple with a standard headline, subheadline layout with a maximum of two columns. Don’t forget to add images that add value to the content.Is your font choice ideal? Make sure your fonts aren’t distracting and impeding readability. Stick with one font family and use the options within that family, such as bold, narrow, and italic.Are you being CAN-SPAM compliant? Email service providers will take care of these compliance issues for you but if you aren’t using an ESP consider investing in one to help you manage lists and email campaigns.5.    Thanking Donors and Supporters  Do you have a way to immediately thank supporters for giving a donation or signing up for your newsletter? Most ESPs and online donation tools give you the opportunity to send an automated reply as soon as an action is taken.Do you thank donors again at a later date, reporting on the impact of their donation?Do donors have a clear understanding of what you’re doing with their financial investment?Make sure to experiment with different thank you methods such as a handwritten note, a phone call, a children’s drawing, or a special thanks directly from a volunteer.6.    Social Media  First, define your desired outcome: Do you want to use Twitter to connect with potential donors or develop your status as a thought leader in your organization’s issue area? Or both?Can your donors easily find you on Twitter and Facebook? If they can’t find you they won’t be following you.Is your content interesting, compelling, and unique? Are you continually asking for donations and follows and neglecting to tell your story?Want a more in-depth list? Download The Online Fundraiser’s Checklist for more ideas.last_img read more

How to Integrate Your Email Program with Your Website

first_imgYou have a website.You’re sending out email newsletters.But how well are these two tools working together?If you haven’t thought about how to integrate your website and email marketing, your nonprofit could be missing out on valuable opportunities to grow your audience, increase donations, and ultimately further your cause.Ready to see what you’ve been missing?The first thing you need to do is add an email sign-up form to your website.Think about all the people who search for your nonprofit and come across your website. Maybe they’ve heard about your organization from a friend, or maybe they’re looking for volunteer opportunities in their area.A great website will open the door for further connection by providing additional ways to stay in touch.Give your website visitors the opportunity to hear about upcoming events, fundraisers, or announcements by adding an email sign-up form to your website.That way, even if they’re not ready to commit and sign-up to volunteer or donate right away, they still have the chance to hear more from your organization.Tip: Make your mailing list inviting by telling new subscribers what they’ll receive even before they sign up. By setting clear expectations about what you’ll send and how often, you’ll ensure that everyone knows what they’re signing up for and they can look forward to receiving your messages.Here’s how Canadian nonprofit The Local Good promotes their mailing list right on their homepage (right»).In addition to your homepage, make sure your sign-up form is visible on each page of your website. You don’t want new visitors to have to hunt it down themselves.Next, encourage your subscribers to go back to your website.Think of your email and website as a two-way street. You want to encourage website visitors to sign up for your emails, but you also want your subscribers to go beyond their inbox and spend some time back on your site.Getting traffic back to your site is dependent on your email content and design. If your nonprofit uses newsletters to share recent blog posts, this is an easy way to link back to your site and increase readership. Include a few lines to attract the readers’ attention, then encourage them to continue reading on your website.Here’s an example from Constant Contact’s Hints and Tips newsletter («left).Here, we provided the blog post headline along with an image and a few lines of text. To read the whole post they would have to go our website, where they have access to even more posts on related topics.In addition to promoting content from your website, don’t forget to include your website URL in the footer of your email. If you’re using an email template, you can use this same footer in each email you send out to give people the option to visit your website or social media channels after reading your latest email. Remember that integrating your email marketing and website will work best if each of these tools is already working well on their own. Could your emails be more effective? Here are 5 questions you should ask yourself before hitting send on your next email.Is your website set up to persuade visitors to donate? Make sure you’re using these 5 proven ways to increase online donations.last_img read more

In Service to Women’s Health: Opportunities to Advance Safe Drinking Water and Sanitation

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Share this: Posted on March 8, 2013March 21, 2017By: Lisa Schechtman, Head of Policy and Advocacy for WaterAid in AmericaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Water is a women’s issue.It’s an important adage, one that highlights how we expect governments to prioritize investments in safe drinking water, sanitation, hygiene (WASH), and water resource management.There is a great deal of evidence behind it, too. Every year, 40 billion working hours are lost to water collection worldwide, mostly by women and girls. This violates their rights to employment and education by taking up time and energy; and their rights to safety and dignity by exposing them to injury, animal attack, and physical and sexual violence. Since the water they collect is usually unsafe, it violates their right to health, exposing them to a variety of diseases, diarrhea, and it can even contribute to uterine prolapse from carrying heavy loads.Sanitation is a women’s issue, too. Lack of sanitation, combined with poor hygiene, allows for the ingestion of fecal matter, creates breeding grounds for vectors of diseases like trachoma, and contaminates water sources. Emerging research emphasizes that lack of WASH impacts maternal health.  In fact, one estimate is that 4% of all maternal deaths can be linked to poor WASH.Any effort to improve women’s health and rights must address WASH. Yet, WASH suffers from the same siloed approach as many other health, development and human rights issues. Policies abound, from a new USAID water strategy expected soon, to the agency’s lauded Gender Equality and Female Empowerment Policy. It remains to be seen whether USAID will show leadership by requiring that the one be in service to the other. Or, if there will be accountability for using WASH to make the most of the US President’s Global Health and Feed the Future Initiatives, both of which recognize the role of WASH to their success while doing little to support or promote it.Recently, I analyzed the US Department of State’s annual report on compliance with the Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act of 2005, which mandated USAID and State prioritize WASH and water investments for the world’s poorest, and those who would benefit most from receiving access, including women and girls. There are many ways that this requirement might be met, including by providing private, secure latrines and menstrual hygiene management supplies at school, since many girls drop out once they reach adolescence. However, in spite of the fact that WASH access could address a major, direct barrier to girls’ secondary education, only 7.5% of U.S. government investments in WASH are spent in the 10 countries where women and girls have the lowest rates of secondary education completion. To me, this is a real missed opportunity—and an example of poor targeting of WASH funds for integrated approaches and cross-cutting benefits to women and girls.This and other problems like it are why the Senator Paul Simon Water for the World Act has had such strong, bipartisan support in both the US House and Senate in recent years. While it didn’t become law last year, we remain in need of the bill’s efforts to require improved attention to the needs of women and girls and the many positive ripple effects of providing WASH to the world’s poorest people. We stand ready to support our Congressional champions in getting the bill to the President’s desk this year. We hope you will join us.For more on the WASH and Women’s Health blog series coordinated by WASH advocates, click here, or visit WASH Advocates.last_img read more