Helping Hands for Kids With ASD

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York One in 68 children nationwide has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition characterized by developmental disabilities that can cause significant social, communication and behavioral challenges, according to the Centers for Disease Control.To help individuals with autism who often struggle to fit into mainstream environments, an increasing number of local services are being offered on Long Island to make typical family outings that may be intimidating easier.“Many families with children who have autism often feel isolated and shut out from the rest of the community,” says Corinne Brown, Kings Park mother of 10-year-old Patrick, who has autism. Brown also represents the Long Island chapter of Talk About Curing Autism (TACA), a national nonprofit organization dedicated to educating, empowering and supporting families affected by autism. “When theaters and museums do offer sensory-friendly events, it is a great opportunity to take our children out as a family and not feel judged.”While further progress is needed, great strides have been made in understanding the needs of families and children with autism.“New York is probably the most aggressive of all states in advocating for people with autism to be integrated in society and succeeding in that,” says John Pfeifer, senior director of clinical services at Life’s WORC Family Center for Autism. “The ultimate goal in supporting kids with autism is helping them succeed in the outside world.”Established in 1971, Life’s WORC is a nonprofit that provides services and support to people with developmental disabilities and autism and their families in Queens, Nassau and Suffolk counties. Life’s WORC offers classes such as cooking, yoga and music therapy, to help improve sensory development, communication and social skills.Helping people with autism takes a village. As kids with autism learn how to function in their natural environment, their families are learning how to support them.“Parents are trained to implement and maintain strategies to help generalize the skills throughout the day and different environments the child is exposed to,” says Andrea Kotler, a licensed behavioral therapist and regional director of Cedarhurst-based Proud Moments ABA Therapy. “Staff will go with clients to events in their community and facilitate their involvement.”Proud Moments also offers social skills programs and “in-the-moment help” in the community. Beyond the agencies, sensory gardens, modified theater performances and special play centers offer opportunities for community inclusion for kids with autism.Beyond the agencies, sensory gardens, and modified theater performances, special play centers offer opportunities for community inclusion for kids with autism.“There is a huge increase in community events and programs meant to include individuals with developmental disabilities in activities that some have not beenable to attend in the past,” says Nicole Weidenbaum, executive director of Nassau Suffolk Services for Autism (NSSA), which offers educational, outreach/training and recreational programs, consultation services and in-home respite services. “We see doctors and dentists opening early for us and allowing us to visit and just sit in the chair for no charge. And doing rounds at our school to have some firsthand training and face time with individuals diagnosed with autism. The youth of today is involved in buddy programs, mentorships, joint soccer teams… the list is endless and I am hopeful that this trend will continue.”Full disclosure: Long Island Press Co-publisher Victoria Schneps-Yunis founded Life’s WORC.AUTISM-FRIENDLY VENUES ON LIAHRC Suffolk’s Sensory Garden283 Route 25A Shoreham, 631-585-0100, ahrcsuffolk.orgAMC Movie Theaters Multiple locations, 877-262-4450, amctheatres.comGersh Academy at West Hills Day Camp21 Sweet Hollow Rd., Huntington, 631-385-3342, gershacademy.orgGymboree Play & MusicMultiple locations, 631-266-1114, gymboreeclasses.comLong Island Children’s MuseumCharles Lindbergh Blvd., Garden City, 516-224-5800, licm.orgNext Generation Dance295 Larkfield Rd., East Northport, 631-486-9191, dancenxg.comPump It UpMultiple locations, 516-466-7867, pumpitupparty.comSensory Beans Inc. Children’s Gym3309 Merrick Rd., Wantagh, 516-308-1462, sensorybeans.orgSky Therapeutic Riding Long Island989 Connetquot Ave., Central Islip, 516-241-2046, SkyRidingLI.comSweetbriar Nature Center62 Eckernkamp Dr., Smithtown, 631-979-6344, sweetbriarnc.comTheatre Three412 Main St., Port Jefferson, 631-928-9100, theatrethree.comlast_img read more

Tackling obesity requires a global effort

first_imgStuff co.nz 6 April 2015In 2010, humanity passed an important milestone. According to the Global Burden of Disease Study, published in the British medical journal The Lancet, obesity became a bigger public-health problem than hunger.Today, according to the latest edition of the study, more than 2.1 billion people – nearly 30 per cent of the global population – are overweight or obese. That is nearly two and a half times the number of adults and children who are undernourished. Obesity is responsible for about 5 per cent of deaths worldwide.This crisis is not just a pressing health concern; it is also a threat to the global economy. The total economic impact of obesity is about US$2 trillion (NZ$2.67t) a year, or 2.8 per cent of world GDP – roughly equivalent to the economic damage caused by smoking or armed violence, war, and terrorism, according to new research by the McKinsey Global Institute.And the problem is likely to worsen. If the current trend continues, almost half of the world’s adult population will be overweight or obese by 2030. As World Health Organisation (WHO) Director-General Margaret Chan has noted, “Not one single country has managed to turn around its obesity epidemic in all age groups.”According to the OECD, from 2000 to 2013, the prevalence of obesity increased by at least 0.5 per cent per year in 130 of the 196 countries for which data were collected.This global epidemic is not confined to advanced countries.http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/67616759/tackling-obesity-requires-a-global-effort.htmllast_img read more

Johnny Manziel leaves AAF game with head injury after tackle attempt

first_imgJohnny Manziel gets hit in the head.He stayed down on the field and appeared to be wobbly while exiting. He’s likely done for the day. #ORLvsMEM pic.twitter.com/nZ4zFJevQH— AAF Reddit (@AAF_Reddit) March 30, 2019Before leaving the game, Manziel completed 2 of 3 passes for 13 yards and rushed for 18 yards on three carries. Manziel, 26, previously played in the CFL but was released by the Montreal Alouettes in February and barred from signing with any other teams in the league after violating an agreement with the CFL. Related News AAF might not survive past this weekend, report says Former Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel threw his first touchdown pass as part of the American Alliance Football league, but he also suffered his first injury since joining the Memphis Express earlier this month.center_img The injury happened after Manziel threw an interception that was returned by Orlando Apollos defensive back Will Hill III. Manziel attempted to tackle Hill and then fell to the ground before he was helped off by the team’s staff. Manziel was ruled out for the rest of the game and was replaced by Brandon Silvers.last_img read more

Simi Valley Calendar

first_imgTODAY Sunday evening hike, 5 o’clock at the Rocky Peak Trailhead at the end of Rocky Peak Road off Santa Susana Pass. Call (805) 584-4400. Golden 50 Picnic and Sundae in the Park, presented by the Simi Valley Historical Society, featuring tours, entertainment, games and an exhibit of Model T’s, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Strathearn Historical Park and Museum, 137 Strathearn Place. Call (805) 526-6453 or go to www.simihistory.com. MONDAY AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinalsSwim and Stay Fit, 6-8 a.m. at the Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1765 Royal Ave., Simi Valley. Monthly fee: $40, or $20 for 65 and older. Call (805) 379-2378. Power Walking, 8-9 a.m. at the Sycamore Drive Community Center, 1692 Sycamore Drive, Room B1, Simi Valley. Monthly fee: $30. Call (805) 584-4400. Muscle Sculpting, 9:30-10:30 a.m. at the Sycamore Drive Community Center, 1692 Sycamore Drive, Room B1, Simi Valley. Call (805) 584-4400. Studio Art Workshop, 9:30-11:30 a.m. at Moorpark Active Adult Center, 799 Moorpark Ave. Call (805) 517-6261. Open Gym Basketball, 1:30-6:30 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $2, or $10 a month. Call (805) 584-4400. Step Aerobics, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Jazzercise Aerobics, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Alternative Recreation Program: Yoga Club, 6:45-7:45 p.m. at Houghton Park, 4333 Township Ave., Simi Valley. Parents can register and participate with their child. Monthly fee: $24. Call (805) 584-4400. New Hope for breast-cancer survivors, 7-8:30 p.m. at Simi Valley Senior Center, 3900 Avenida Simi. Free. Registration required. Call (805) 527-5360, Option 3. Aqua Fit, 7-8 p.m. at Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1692 Sycamore Drive, Simi Valley. Call (805) 584-4400. Simi Peggers Cribbage Club, 7 p.m., at Simi Country Mobile Home Park Clubhouse, 1550 Rory Lane, Simi Valley. Call (805) 527-8164. Water Exercise, 7-8 p.m. at Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1692 Sycamore Drive. Fee: $40. Call (805) 584-4400. Women’s Anger Management class, 7:30 p.m. at Cornerstone Counseling Center, 1633 Erringer Road, No. 203-B, Simi Valley. Call (805) 582-2619. Simi Valley Boots and Slippers Square Dance Club, 7:30-9:30 p.m. at Simi Valley Senior Center, 3900 Avenida Simi. Fee: $5. Lessons taught by Dick Hodnefield. Call (805) 583-3055 or e-mail [email protected] Deep Water Workout, 8-9 p.m. at the Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1692 Sycamore Drive. Monthly fee: $45. Call (805) 584-4400. TUESDAY Family planning clinic, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Ventura County Public Health, 660 E. Los Angeles Ave., Suite B2, Simi Valley. For an appointment, call (805) 578-3677. Jazzercise Aerobics, 9-10 a.m. and 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Rotary of Simi Valley will meet at noon at Grand Vista Hotel, 999 Enchanted Way. Call (805) 583-4825. Videos in the Lounge, 1 p.m. at Simi Valley Senior Center, 3900 Avenida Simi. Call (805) 583-6363. Bowling, 4-5:30 p.m. at Brunswick Valley Bowl, 5255 Cochran St., Simi Valley. Fee: $5 per week. Call (805) 584-4400. Tuesday Evening Hike, 6:30, meet at the Long Canyon parking lot at Long Canyon Road and Wood Ranch Parkway. Call (805) 529-5581. Story time, 7 p.m. at Simi Valley Library, 2969 Tapo Canyon Road. Call (805) 526-1735. Simi Solos Toastmasters will meet, 7:30 p.m., Simi Valley YMCA, 3200 Cochran St. Call (805) 990-4950. Overeaters Anonymous, 8 p.m. at Church of Christ, 1554 Sinaloa Road, Simi Valley. Call (805) 581-4717 or (805) 529-8183. Open Gym Basketball, 6-9 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $2, or $10 a month. Call (805) 584-4400. WEDNESDAY Swim and Stay Fit, 6-8 a.m. at the Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1765 Royal Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $40/month; 65 and older, $20/month. Call (805) 379-2378. Kiwanis Club of Simi Valley will meet, 7 a.m. at Marie Callender’s, 20 W. Cochran St. Call (805) 526-4649. Chair Exercise, 8:30 a.m. at Moorpark Active Adult Center, 799 Moorpark Ave. Call (805) 529-6864, Ext. 261. CPR Update: Health Care Provider class, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Simi Valley Hospital, 2975 N. Sycamore Drive. Call (805) 955-6890. Tot Time story time, 11 a.m. at Borders Books and Music, 2910 Tapo Canyon Road, Simi Valley. For ages 2-5. Call (805) 526-2800. Step Aerobics, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Emotional Intelligence Training for Parents, 6 p.m. at Cornerstone Counseling Center, 1633 Erringer Road, No. 203-B, Simi Valley. Call (805) 582-2619. Action Parent and Teen Support Program, 6:30 p.m. at Apollo High School, 3150 School St., Simi Valley. Hotline: (800) 367-8336. Men’s Anger Management class, 7 p.m. at Cornerstone Counseling Center, 1633 Erringer Road, No. 203-B, Simi Valley. Call (805) 582-2619. Water Exercise, 7-8 p.m. at Rancho Simi Community Park pool, 1692 Sycamore Drive. Fee: $40. Call (805) 584-4400. Emotions Anonymous, 7:30-9 p.m. at United Methodist Church, Wood Room, 2394 Erringer Road, Simi Valley. Free. Call (805) 526-6231. Clutterers Anonymous will meet, 7:30-9 p.m., Simi Valley Presbyterian Church, 4832 Cochran St., Room 210. Call (805) 526-5475. Deep Water Workout, 8-9 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Park pool, 1692 Sycamore Drive. Monthly fee: $45. Call (805) 584-4400. THURSDAY Rotary Club of Simi Sunrise will meet, 7 a.m. at Grand Vista Hotel, 999 Enchanted Way, Simi Valley. Call (805) 520-4894. Jazzercise Aerobics, 9-10 a.m. and 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Scrabble Group will meet, 9:30 a.m. at the Moorpark Active Adult Center, 799 Moorpark Ave. Call (805) 517-6261. Videos in the Lounge, 1 p.m. at Simi Valley Senior Center, 3900 Avenida Simi. Call (805) 583-6363. Reproductive health care clinic, 1:30-4:30 p.m. at Ventura County Public Health, 660 E. Los Angeles Ave., Suite B2, Simi Valley. Call (805) 578-3677. Tap for Fitness, 2:30-4 p.m. at Moorpark Active Adult Center, 799 Moorpark Ave. Call (805) 517-6261. Circuit Training, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Thursday Evening Hike, 6 at the Chumash Trailhead. Call the Rancho Simi Recreation and Park District at (805) 584-4400. Co-Custody Parenting class, 6-7 p.m. at Cornerstone Counseling Center, 1633 Erringer Road, No. 203-B, Simi Valley. Call (805) 582-2619. Open Gym Volleyball, 6-9 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $2; or $10 a month. Call (805) 584-4400. Simi Valley Toastmasters, 7:30 p.m. at Clarion Commons, 5300 E. Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Call (805) 522-9591. Ventura County Rose Society, monthly meeting featuring speakers and presentations, 7 p.m. at the Cowan Conference Center,550 Airport Way, Camarillo. Call (805) 523-9003 or go to www.venturarose.org. FRIDAY Basic Training, 6-7 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave. Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Open Gym Basketball, 6-9 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $2, or $10 a month. Call (805) 584-4400. SATURDAY Men’s Anger Management class, 8 a.m. at Cornerstone Counseling Center, 1633 Erringer Road, No. 203-B, Simi Valley. Call (805) 582-2619. Jazzercise Aerobics, 8-9 a.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Fee: $5, or $25 a month. Call (805) 584-4456. Open Gym Basketball, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave., Simi Valley. Fee: $2, or $10 a month. Call (805) 584-4400. 17th annual Cajun Fest, fundraiser presented by the Rotary Club of Simi Sunrise, ends today, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. at Rancho Santa Susana Community Park, 5005 Los Angeles Avenue, Simi Valley. Call (805) 520-4894 or go to www.simicajun.org. Calendar events are compiled each week by Staff Writer Angie Valencia-Martinez. Items must reach the Daily News one week before the Sunday on which they are to run. Items must be typewritten. Phone numbers must be attached for contact purposes. Mail to Simi Calendar, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365-4200. Fax (805) 583-0880. Angie Valencia-Martinez can be reached at (805) 583-7604 or by e-mail at [email protected] local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

How do Raiders feel about roughing the passer controversy?: ‘It’s just a shame’

first_imgALAMEDA — Mo Hurst doesn’t remember the last time he helped a quarterback up after taking him to the ground.Against the Dolphins last Sunday, after tackling Ryan Tannehill on 3rd-and-9 around Oakland’s 45-yard line, Hurst extended his right hand for Tannehill before even fully standing himself.“I really didn’t think I was going to get called,” Hurst said Thursday. “If I help him up maybe they’ll be like, ‘Aw, he’s being nice to him. He’s not really trying to do anything bad.’”The ref threw a …last_img

Miles apart: Saif and Kareena spotted in two continents as the D-day nears

first_imgKareena Kapoor was in the Capital on Tuesday to promote her upcoming film, Heroine, which opens on Friday.And her husband-to-be Saif Ali Khan was spotted at the London Fashion Week attending the Burberry SS13 Collection at West Albert Lawns in Kensington Garden on Monday.Even as Saif’s mother Sharmila Tagore has sent out the invitation cards and the trousseau is being designed, the actors are still mum about their much-anticipated wedding on October 16.”Whenever Saif and I do it, our fans will 100 per cent know. Nobody knows about my wedding. I want people to talk about my film instead. Whenever we decide it is the right time, we will tell the world about it. And currently, this is not the right time,” Kareena said.Reportedly, Hollywood superstar Brad Pitt has congratulated Saif and Kareena for their upcoming nuptials. “I am honoured that Angelina and Brad have wished me luck for my wedding. They are lovely people and I would definitely like to meet them,” Kareena said.One isn’t too sure whether Saif is in London to get a break from all the hype and hoopla, shop for some wedding goodies or just have a bachelor vacation while his bride-to-be is busy promoting her next big release.Kareena is currently excited about the upcoming film where she is playing the lead character of Mahi Arora. “It’s a performance-oriented film and I am playing such a character for the first time which has got so many layers in it. It will definitely break my image of portraying the girl-next-door in films,” she said. “I never had any mental pressure. I always wanted to work with Madhur Bhandarkar. When I first came on the set I didnt have any pre-conceived notions about him. I came with an open mind and tried to give my best possible shot,” Kareena added.Saif was seated on the front row at the London event. The actor looked dapper in an elegant black tuxedo teamed with a polka-dotted neck-tie. He also sported a beard at the show.(With inputs from PTI)advertisementlast_img read more

Fundraisers, not just donors, are sick of endless appeals

first_imgPhoto via Green America.The Chronicle of Philanthropy has a fascinating interview with fundraising guru Penelope Burk, author of the upcoming Donor-Centered Leadership.Turns out it’s not just donors who grow weary of too many direct mail appeals and telemarketing calls. It’s apparently a frequent reason fundraisers quit their jobs — the relentless pressure to bombard donors. They’d prefer to take the time to figure out which solicitations work, but they often aren’t given the time or latitude to have a more thoughtful approach.Over-solicitation, says Burk, is the most common reasons donors give for stopping their support of a charity. Instead donors want to know what’s been done with their money. Then they’d be willing to give again. But too often, they get appeals instead of thanks and reports on impact.No wonder we have 60% churn in our sector.So what do we do instead? Here’s Burk’s advice.1. Thank donors after they give.2. Send them a follow up thanks with detailed information about how their money was used.3. Only ask for money AFTER you do these two things, and when you do, be as specific as you can about why you are asking for money. What specific cause will benefit?Great advice.Do you agree? Do you feel this way?last_img read more

New Study: Are You Leaving Money in the Middle?

first_imgMind the gap.That’s the advice in a new report on mid-level donor programs. The folks at Sea Change Strategies caution that nonprofits are missing out on a ton of money simply because they’re overlooking a committed and productive audience: middle donors —the donors who give more than low-dollar direct marketing donations, but less than major gift targets. THE MISSING MIDDLE: Neglecting Middle Donors Is Costing You Millions, by Sea Change Strategies’ Alia McKee and Mark Rovner, does double duty as a wake-up call and roadmap for creating effective mid-level donor programs. The study is based on interviews and data from 27 organizations and experts, including heavy hitters like Roger Craver and nonprofits such as The Nature Conservancy and the Human Rights Campaign. The free whitepaper includes:8 habits of highly-effective mid-level donor programsA sample framework for a 30-day action planIn-depth profiles of two highly effective mid-level programsFresh from the AFP conference in San Antonio, Alia McKee shares some more insight about The Missing Middle:How do you distinguish mid-level giving from a major donor program? Is it simply the dollar amount or are there other things going on here?Alia: It’s really about the dollar amount. Of course the definition of middle donor varies from organization to organization, but it tends to hover anywhere between $250-$9,000 cumulative in a year.In the report, you touch on possible challenges on getting executive buy-in. Can you give us some ideas on how to make the case for investing in a mid-level donor program?Alia:1. Among the groups participating in the Wired Wealthy Study, donors at the $1,000 to $10,000 levels (annual giving via all channels) represented roughly one percent of the donor population, but were giving more than a third of the dollars. That’s a HUGE amount of revenue.2. Middle donors are actually an organization’s most committed donors. They will be retained and upgraded far more than smaller donors and far more than major donors. They represent a very significant block of money, commitment and loyalty.3. A functional and philosophical gap exists between direct marketing programs and major gifts programs. Hence, middle donors often receive lackluster treatment that is driven by attribution wars and resentment across the organizational divide. But their capacity to give is huge—so minor tweaks to their treatment can yield big results in revenue. What was the biggest surprise for you in this research?Alia: Despite the fact that every fundraiser and expert we talked to universally agreed that mid-level donors are exceptionally valuable, they also agreed that most organizations haven’t made the kinds of investments necessary to make the most of this immense opportunity.Can small shops pursue a mid-level donor program?Alia: Absolutely. Small changes in stewardship of middle donors can yield results regardless of an organization’s size. Of course, capacity is an issue. But many nonprofits we spoke to approached this creatively including:Staff pizza parties to stuff personalized mailers to middle donorsVolunteer phone calls to middle donors thanking them for their supportMore substantive content to middle donors culled from other organizational communicationsCan your online efforts help your mid-level strategy?Alia: Digital outreach is not the silver bullet when it comes to middle donors. You must communicate with those donors across channels (e.g. be channel agnostic) and give them substantive communications in person, via phone, by notecard or by email. Ideally, you’d reach them through their self-selected preferred channels. Just for fun: Monie in the Middle or Malcolm in the Middle?Alia: Malcolm in the Middle, but only because of Bryan Cranston!Get in touch with your Missing Middle. Join our free webinar with Sea Change Strategies’ Alia McKee and Mark Rovner on Tuesday, May 6 at 1pm EDT. Register now for your chance to hear from these two fundraising gurus and get your mid-level donor questions answered. (Can’t attend the live session? Register anyway to get a copy of the recording sent directly to you via email.)last_img read more

New Research Challenges Excess Mortality Risk of Adolescent Mothers

first_imgPosted on September 7, 2012March 31, 2017By: Ana Langer, Director of the Maternal Health Task Force and Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Over the course of the Safe Motherhood movement, the common wisdom has been that adolescent women have a highly elevated risk of maternal death —roughly two times higher —compared to women in their twenties, and this has led to calls for a focus on the unmet maternal health care needs of adolescent mothers. But research commissioned by the MHTF reveals that —averaged across 38 countries— the maternal mortality ratio for women age 15-19 is just 28 percent higher than among women age 20-24.Ann K. Blanc, PhD, former MHTF Director, and her colleagues, William Winfrey, PhD, and John Ross, PhD, analyzed available survey data to produce age-specific maternal mortality ratios using Demographic and Health Surveys data from 2000-2008.  The result is a paper titled, “New Findings for MM Age Patterns August 10”. The surprising finding on the comparative mortality risk of adolescents could have significant impact on future policy advocacy and program development.Filling knowledge gaps is a critical component of the MHTF mandate, and this paper does just that. Challenging assumptions and pursuing neglected areas of research is certain to have positive implications for achieving our collective goal of eradicating preventable maternal mortality and morbidity in our lifetimes.I hope you find this paper as useful and as illuminating as I have. We welcome your comments.Access the PDF of the paper here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more