Primary schools at ‘breaking point’ over violent children

first_imgRadio NZ News 10 April 2017Family First Comment: Most of the Principals blame poverty, but the Principal of Manurewa East School gets it right….“There’s many factors, from the fact that they’re sometimes on devices all day long, they’re not getting enough sleep, they’ll have parents who abandoned them. There are so many boys who don’t have fathers or they have fathers who are just poor, poor role models. I’m just very sick of it.”Violent behaviour by children is on the rise and teachers are enduring assaults that have included kicks to the groin and a pencil in the eye, primary school principals say.The Principals Federation and the Educational Institute (NZEI) said their members were reporting a growing problem caused by deprivation and family dysfunction.But the Education Ministry said it was not aware of any research or statistics that backed up principals’ claims.Last week, Northland schools threatened to start suspending violent children because of a lack of support. The president of the Principals Federation Whetu Cormick said it was a national problem.“I’m hearing from my colleagues across the country that they’re at breaking point with the number of high behaviour issues that are in their schools,” he said.Mr Cormick said principals from all over the country had told him about assaults on themselves and on their staff.“I’ve heard that principals have been assaulted, punched, kicked, kicked in the private parts, a teacher who was poked in the eye with a pencil who needed medical attention. Furniture being thrown around the room which has contacted professionals who work in the room.”Mr Cormick said for some children violent behaviour was a result of other special education needs.“Young people who have got multiple issues including ADHD for example. We’ve got children who are suffering from various syndromes. We’re also hearing about children who are anxious and some of them who have been diagnosed with depression.”Wellington principal Mark Potter said he had heard similar stories while travelling the country as a member of the NZEI’s executive.“We’ve always had children who’ve been challenging. It’s the number of children that we have that is the big issue right now,” he said.Mr Potter said deprivation appeared to be the cause of the problem.“It seems to be very much related to the growing disparities in our communities and society. So the more families that are under duress or under stress suffering from poverty the more you’ve got children who are actually experiencing those things and presenting at school with behaviours arising from that.”The principal of Manurewa East School, Phil Palfrey, said he had expelled two children already this year because they were too dangerous to have around other children.He said the children did not have disabilities or special needs, they were simply violent.“Sometimes other children have had to pull these kids off other children to stop them from getting worse. And that’s with adults who are near who are paid to look after these children – these children can be so quick and so unpredictable that even a close adult can’t get there quickly.”Mr Palfrey blamed bad parenting. “There’s many factors, from the fact that they’re sometimes on devices all day long, they’re not getting enough sleep, they’ll have parents who abandoned them. There are so many boys who don’t have fathers or they have fathers who are just poor, poor role models. I’m just very sick of it.”Helping children depended on parents who were willing to cooperate and the problem area was those families who refused to do that, he said.READ MORE: http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/328497/primary-schools-at-‘breaking-point’-over-violent-childrenKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inboxlast_img read more

September 29, 2018 Police Blotter

first_imgSeptember 29, 2018 Police Blotter092918 Decatur County Jail Report092918 Decatur County Fire Report092918 Decatur County EMS Report092918 Decatur County Law Report092918 Batesville Police Blotterlast_img

Clippers’ Ivica Zubac proves a problem against Houston

first_img Clippers’ Paul George: ‘If I make shots, this series could be a little different’ “Game ball goes to ‘Zu’ tonight, G,” Patrick Beverley says in the video the Clippers posted online depicting the team huddling in the locker room after Thursday’s 120-105 runaway victory in Houston. “Way to hoop.”Starting center Ivica Zubac – aka. “Zu” or “Big Zu,” or “Zube” if Coach Doc Rivers is doing the talking – came up appropriately big in the victory against one of the Western Conference’s best teams, setting a Clippers record by scoring 17 points and collecting 12 rebounds in fewer than 21 minutes of play.Following direction, in other words.“We told him before the game, he’s definitely got to make an impact tonight,” forward Paul George told reporters after the game, referencing the Clippers’ game-planning in preparation for the Rockets’ ambitious small-ball system. Zubac has worked hard to improve so many facets of his game, from his footwork and speed to his rim protection and finishing. One area in which the 22-year-old Croatian big man has long been elite: listening.“Everybody’s on him and he don’t fold,” Beverley said earlier this season, describing an instance when six or seven coaches were in Zubac’s ear. “He stays mentally strong. He’s never barking back. He’s never fighting back. He’s taking all of the constructive criticism, and each game he’s been getting better and better.”Montrezl Harrell said his fellow big man takes it all to heart, which his teammates recognize and respect.“Zubac’s a young guy, he really gets down on himself at times, but it’s all about playing the correct way and picking each other up,” Harrell said. “We’re a team; we’re gonna win together, we’re gonna lose together, we’re all cheering for each other no matter what.”So the Clippers celebrated Zubac on Thursday, when, against the undersized Rockets, he was perhaps as good as he’s been. Houston had no answer for the Clippers’ 7-footer, who quickly recorded five rebounds in fewer than five minutes of play and, later, scored a big-time dunk on former league MVP James Harden. Clippers hope they can play to their capabilities, quell Mavericks’ momentum Game 4 photos: Luka Doncic, Mavs shock Clippers in overtime Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorcenter_img What the Clippers are saying the day after Luka Doncic’s game-winner tied series, 2-2 He also currently ranks second in the NBA offensive rebounding percentage (14.8) and is the only member of the Clippers who has played in all 62 of their games this season.They’ll count on Zubac’s contributions again Sunday when they collide with his former team for the third time this season.The second-place Clippers will host the Western Conference-leading Lakers – who in 2016 drafted Zubac 32nd overall, and then last season traded him to the team down the hall for Mike Muscala – in a 12:30 p.m. showdown at Staples Center.Zubac’s squad will be riding a six-game winning streak, including Thursday’s rout of the Rockets in which he played such a big role and, as he put it, channeling the Clippers’ marketing department: “We played our way.” “He really was felt tonight,” said Kawhi Leonard, who had five assists Thursday – three on Zubac buckets. “He was a factor for us, being a big target, rolling to the basket, getting rebounds.”“He had to be huge for us and he stepped up to the plate and made himself available,” George added. “And he was physical with those guys.”Added Marcus Morris Sr.: “Big guys can’t guard him, let alone somebody smaller.”Zubac, who is shooting 60.6 percent from the field this season, hasn’t missed a shot since Feb. 26, going 14 for 14 in four games since.Related Articles For Lakers’ LeBron James, Jacob Blake’s shooting is bigger issue than a big Game 4 victory last_img read more