Family home ready, set, go!

first_imgThere’s plenty of living spaces so family members can find “me time”There even a two-car garage and huge store room.Follow Kieran Clair on Twitter at @kieranclair This St Lucia home will adapt well to a family buyerThe rise of multi-generational living means mums and dads are looking for sleek suburban homes that cater for growing kids AND provide a place for a bit of alone time.This 436sq m home at 52 Ninth Avenue, St Lucia offers the design savvy family plenty to enjoy despite its 405sq m land size. More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investorless than 1 hour agoThe home sits high above its road frontThe property is perched above its road front and provides four-bedroom, four-bathroom accommodation.center_img The home has a high-end feels contemporary buyers loveThat means the family can avoid sharing vanity spaces.Apart from the abundance of wet area, the home has four other living spaces, plus a study, and a large rear outdoor entertaining area that includes an elevated pool.last_img read more

PensionDanmark invests DKK2.9bn in North Sea wind-power grid

first_imgTenneT, which is owned by the Dutch state, will finance most of the expected construction costs of the DKK14.2bn project, as well as building and operating the grid. DolWin3 is planned to be ready for use in 2017, and the system has a total capacity of 900MW. Torben Möger Pedersen, chief executive at PensionDanmark, said: “We are very satisfied with our cooperation with CIP, which is undertaking and managing many of our investments in stable alternatives.” He said the investment was a good addition to the pension fund’s existing investments in alternatives, and would contribute to securing a good, steady return for scheme members for many years to come.PensionDanmark said its target was to invest 20% of its total assets in more than DKK150bn of stable alternatives such as property and infrastructure.The investment is subject to the approval from German competition authorities, CIP said. PensionDanmark is investing DKK2.9bn (€384m) in a transmission network for wind energy in the North Sea to be built and operated by Dutch company TenneT.The Danish labour-market pension scheme is making the investment via Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners (CIP), which was set up in 2012 with DKK6bn from PensionDanmark as seed investor.However, CIP said this investment was being made through a separate legal structure with PensionDanmark – rather than the partnership – as the investor. The investment in the new DolWin3 offshore grid connection – which will transmit power to German customers on the mainland from several wind farms in the German North Sea – will be made jointly with TenneT, CIP said. last_img read more

Donaire blasts Rigondeaux for quitting vs Lomachenko

first_imgFILE – Nonito Donaire, left, and Guillermo Rigondeaux face off ahead of their super bantamweight title fight. APA five-division champion, Nonito Donaire knows a thing or two about fighting, so when he saw Guillermo Rigondeux quit mid-fight against Vasyl Lomachenko, that decision did not quite sit well with him.“Incredible performance from Loma, Rigo has never been in this position where he has been dominated every way,” Donaire posted on Twitter Sunday. “But I still can’t understand how a fighter quits.”ADVERTISEMENT “I fought with bloody hands, I fought with numerous fractures, and sometimes my brain tells me to stop and tells me I’ve done enough but never in my life have I ever quit.”Rigondeux, a natural super bantamweight, moved two weight classes to challenge Lomachenko for the WBO world super featherweight belt and failed after he quit on his stool before the seventh round.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSBrian Heruela arrival bolsters Phoenix backcourt, defenseREAD: Lomachenko stops Rigondeaux in bout between Olympic greats“You could knock me down and I’ll at least attempt to get up,” said Donaire (38-4). “But I won’t quit ever, it is what it is.” Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS) PLAY LIST 02:11SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)03:47PH’s Charly Suarez boxing lightweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)03:24PH’s James Palicte boxing light welterweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Donaire added that he wasn’t bitter losing to Rigendeaux and that he even wanted to see his former opponent to win especially after moving up a couple of weight classes.READ: Donaire yields world boxing title to Rigondeaux“The Filipino Flash” lost to Rigondeaux in 2013 via unanimous decision in their unification bout for the WBA and WBO world super bantamweight titles. Donaire, the current WBC silver featherweight champion even mentioned that he also wanted Nicholas Walters, whom he lost to in 2014, to win against Lomachenko back in 2016.READ: Unbeaten Walters KOs Donaire for titleADVERTISEMENT “Some people believe I’m sour or bitter and wanted Rigo to lose, on the contrary, I wanted Walters and Rigo to win because in doing so it gives me the credibility of getting beaten by the top pound-for-pound,” said Donaire.“Staying on the stool with half the fight left, on the other hand, negates the macho image purported by going two weight divisions up.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Depleted Spurs beat Suns for 8th win in 9 games Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ View commentslast_img read more

Game theory can be used to identify potential flaws in current cancer

first_img Source:https://moffitt.org/newsroom/press-release-archive/2018/new-study-views-cancer-treatment-as-a-game-to-find-strategies-that-improve-patient-outcomes/ Aug 10 2018Game theory can be utilized to identify potential flaws in current cancer treatment approaches and suggest new strategies to improve outcomes in patients with metastatic cancer, according to a new article published online today by JAMA Oncology. The study, which is authored by a mathematician, an evolutionary biologist and clinical physicians from Moffitt Cancer Center and Maastricht University, challenges the decades old standard of treatment for metastatic cancers in which drugs are typically administered continuously at the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) until the tumor progresses.The study shows that, by viewing cancer therapy as a game between the treating physician and the cancer cells, continuous administration of the same drug or drugs at MTD fails to exploit critical advantages possessed by the physician. Instead, the authors encourage oncologists to develop flexible strategic treatment plans. By exploiting his/her knowledge of the cancer’s evolutionary dynamics, the oncologist can continuously adjust drugs and doses to delay or prevent cancer progression caused by the evolution of resistance. With each adjustment, the oncologist updates information on the cancer’s response.The Moffitt research team, led by Robert A. Gatenby, M.D., used mathematical modeling to investigate cancer treatment as a game played by the physician and cancer cells. In their study, the researchers demonstrate that the physician has two big advantages over his/her tumor opponents. First, the physician is rational while the cancer cells are not. This means that the physician, by understanding the principles of evolution, can plan ahead and anticipate the tumor cells’ response. Cancers, like all evolving organisms, can never anticipate the future and because of this are particularly vulnerable to changes in treatment by the physician. In addition, the physician has the advantage of always “playing” first – the cancer cells cannot begin to evolve resistance until the physician administers a therapy. This sequence of moves means that cancer treatment has a distinctive game theoretic form termed a “leader-follower” or “Stackelberg” game. Von Stackelberg was a German mathematician who extensively investigated the game dynamics in the mid-20th century. His work and that of several other game theorists have demonstrated that the leader in a Stackelberg gains a substantial advantage by using the first move to limit subsequent tumor responses. Furthermore, the leader can use fore-knowledge of the cancer to anticipate and steer its evolution and vulnerabilities.”Current treatments for metastatic cancers, by giving the same drug repeatedly at the maximum tolerated dose, can inadvertently increase the speed with which cancer cells can evolve effective counter measures and then regrow,” said Gatenby, co-director of Moffitt’s Center of Excellence in Evolutionary Therapy. “Today, therapy is usually changed only when the tumor progresses. By using this strategy the physician cedes control to the cancer. Although standard practice for decades, administering drugs at maximum-tolerated dose until progression is rarely the optimal game theoretic strategy for metastatic cancers.”Related StoriesNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancer”The current maximum-tolerated dose approach will only be successful if the cancer cell population is made up of similar cells that are unable to adapt and evolve quickly,” said Joel Brown, Ph.D., an evolutionary biologist at Moffitt. “That is rarely what we see for cancers that have widely metastasized. We can and must anticipate, steer and exploit the cancer cells’ evolutionary responses to our therapies.”The study proposes changes in the standard treatment paradigms by encouraging physicians to better use their advantages as the sentient leader in their high-stakes game with the cancer. They can do this by continuously adjusting treatment and forcing the cancer cells to constantly change their response to unpredictable attacks from new drugs or combinations of drugs. The authors suggest that the physicians begin by precisely defining the goal of treatment. Is to cure the patient or is it to prolong life? This allows the physician to better balance the benefit of therapy against the potential toxicity and its effects on the patient’s quality of life. In a related suggestion, the authors suggest that the treating physician develops a strategy to deal with cancer cells that are resistant to therapy. If the goal is to cure, then resistant cells must be killed or prevented. If the goal is control, then physicians can use evolutionary principles to minimize the proliferation of resistant cells while limiting the toxicity of treatment. Finally, the physician, as the sentient player in the game, can continuously analyze the intratumoral evolutionary dynamics based on the tumor response during each treatment cycle. This information, often with the aid of a mathematical model, can provide information to improve the outcomes in subsequent cycles – a well-recognized approach in recursive games termed Bellman’s Principle.To operationalize their theoretical study, the research team suggests precision medicine for metastatic cancers. In addition to using molecular techniques to identify treatment targets, precision medicine should integrate strategies to deal with the evolution of resistance which almost invariably leads to failure of even highly successful targeted therapies. The health team should design an explicit Resistance Management Plan (RMP) for each patient – an approach commonly used in pest management. They also recommend that the physician analyzes the outcomes of every patient, similar to After Action Reports (AAR) used in the military and disaster response teams. By learning from each individual patient, personalized oncology can itself evolve and improve over time.While this approach is designed for incurable metastatic cancers, Katerina Stankova, Ph.D., a mathematician at Maastricht University and an expert on game theory, notes that the full dynamics of Stackelberg games have not yet been rigorously explored. “As we develop the mathematics in conjunction with cancer therapies, we expect that our analyses will uncover novel game-theoretic, evolutionary strategies that may increase the probability of curing even aggressive and heterogeneous cancers,” Stankova added.last_img read more