Graham Henry talks us through his World Cup emotions

first_img Former All Black coach Graham Henry and assistant coach Wayne Smith with WWE Cup during a parade in AucklandTo win the World Cup means everything to me and it has brought me some peace, especially after what happened in 2007. We really showed that All Blacks tenacity in the final, and I was so proud to be standing there at Eden Park as a New Zealander, having so much respect for what the boys have done over the past eight years. It’s been outstanding.Winning the World Cup is something we’ve dreamed of for a while, and now we’ve achieved that dream it’s hard to find the right words to sum up my feelings. The tournament was a huge achievement for the people of New Zealand and I’m so happy for them after the way they backed the players and coaches. The players are a superb group of young New Zealanders and I really appreciate what they’ve done. Their character astounds me.I can’t say enough about the role of Richie McCaw. He’s an experienced and talented leader of this team and has developed into probably the best leader this country has ever had. You can’t buy that in the shops. You only get that from experience and he’s led this country for 60-odd Tests and got stronger and stronger.Richie is an inspiration to the rest of the team. After the final he could hardly walk. How he played with that foot injury I’ve no idea. So he’ll have some time out of the game. He played on heart and determination alone and this confirms him as one of the finest All Blacks ever. Winning a World Cup puts the icing on everything that he’s done.World Cup winning leaders: Henry and McCaw My story proves that coaches need time. Look at Sir Alex Ferguson. I know he has a pretty good team but he does pretty well, doesn’t he? There are a lot of senior people who’ve coached for a long time around the world who are very successful and I don’t think the answer is to shoot people if they don’t win. If they have talent, persevere with them. If they’ve got the ability to do the job, give them the chance to do it. You learn from your failures. How else can you learn?I was very sad for Dan Carter. He’s a special person and a special player. He wanted the stage to perform on at the peak of his career.And Stephen Donald? What a fairy tale for that guy to come on and kick the winning penalty in a World Cup final. Two weeks earlier, he was fishing for whitebait and now he’s the man. It’s special because Stephen is a top bloke and you want him to be successful because he gives his all to the team. He kicked the winning goal and he’ll live for the next 70 years on that kick.I was honoured to win the IRB Coach of the Year but that award was just a reflection of what Richie and the boys have done, alongside the special group of coaches and management teams we have. I must pay tribute to my fellow coaches, the guys who are much better than me at coaching the game. I have huge respect for what they’ve done – Wayne Smith, Steve Hansen, Mike Cron and Mick Byrne have been superb.Also Darren Shand and his management team and Nick Gill and his medical team are the best professionals I’ve ever worked with. Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. I also wouldn’t have coached New Zealand to a World Cup final victory if it wasn’t for my wife Raewyn, who is the fourth selector!I’m now coaching the Barbarians against Australia and I also look forward to getting back to Wales and catching up with a few old mates. I’ll be a fan in the stands on 3 December when Wales play Australia.This article appeared in the December 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine. Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here. AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – OCTOBER 23: Richie McCaw of the All Blacks hugs Graham Henry, coach of the All Blacks after the 2011 IRB Rugby World Cup Final match between France and New Zealand at Eden Park on October 23, 2011 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visitlast_img read more

England Sevens side unchanged for South African leg

first_imgDUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – DECEMBER 02: Marcus Watson of England during the match between England and Kenya on Day Two of the IRB Dubai Sevens at the Sevens Stadium on December 2, 2011 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images) Marcus Watson heads to South Africa as part of an unchanged Sevens sideEngland have named the same squad that lifted the Dubai Sevens title last weekend for the Nelson Mandela Bay Sevens in Port Elizabeth that kicks off tomorrow.Head coach Ben Ryan keeps faith with the 12-man group with forward Chris Brightwell the 13th man who can be called on if England suffer any injuries during the tournament.Half-back John Brake is still sidelined by the broken finger sustained on the eve of the Gold Coast Sevens in Australia a fortnight ago.England, second in the HSBC Sevens World Series rankings, face the USA (10.21 GMT), Samoa (13.27) and Argentina (17.54) in three tough Pool A encounters on the opening day.Ryan is pleased with the commitment he’s seen in training with his players all fighting for places in the starting line-up.“We’re in a good situation because of the competition within the squad,” he said. “We used the same starting side in all six games in Dubai. They’ve been playing against our reserves and there’s been a real cutting edge in training. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ryan said: “The boys were pretty fatigued after the [Dubai] tournament, then by travelling for 17 hours to Port Elizabeth, so lots have been stretched on the treatment table and massaged but all in all they’ve handled it pretty well and I’m sure we’ll be at full throttle on Friday.”England Sevens XII: Greg Barden (captain),Chris Cracknell,Isoa Damudamu (British Army),Simon Hunt,Christian Lewis-Pratt,Dan Norton,Tom Powell,James Rodwell,Nick Royle,Mathew Turner,Rob Vickerman,Marcus Watson (Saracens) “No-one thinks they’re God’s gift and everyone wants to start. We all know it’s on  e last tournament and we’ll give it everything and then have our rest over Christmas. The group we’re in will take any chance of complacency away. Samoa, Argentina and the USA are all sides who have beaten us in the past three years.“Everybody will want to have a crack at us now but we think we’re on an upward curve. We need to be consistent and that means performing well at lots of tournaments.”This is the first time three tournaments have been played back-to-back in the World Series and when England return home on December 12 they will have travelled more than 33,000 miles on 10 separate flights across a dozen time zones in less than four weeks.last_img read more

Top 14 play-offs: Samson ready to deliver knockout blow

first_imgVictory against Montpellier in front of their home crowd would see Samson pack down against Clermont, the side he won the coveted Bouclier de Brennus with in 2010, in the semis. The French international is under no illusion as to how tough both assignments will be. “It’s going to be hard as every team is playing at a similar level, so it will come down to minor details,” he admits. “We need to be as precise as possible. It’s knockout rugby.”Castres boast a squad that is good enough to worry any team on the day. In South African scrum-half Rory Kockott they have this season’s second highest scorer with 326 points from 25 games – just 24 points behind Jonny Wilkinson – and so often the focal point for players like Max Evans and ex-Gloucester flyer Marcel Garvey to feed off.Once the Lions tour is over, Evans’s countryman Richie Gray will be joining the Tarn-based outfit; a move Samson says is great for the club despite the fact they may be rivals for the No 4 shirt. “We are losing Joe Tekori (Castres lock and captain, leaving to join Toulouse), who is an integral member of the team,” he adds, “so to recruit a player of equal calibre – we can see that in his good performances for Scotland – is great for the squad going forward.”Whilst Gray is off taming Wallabies, Samson hopes to maintain his presence in the French squad that he was called up to last summer. Argentina were the opponents then and after starting against both England and Ireland in this year’s Six Nations he’s dead-set on taking on what is his biggest international challenge to date – the All Blacks. Committed: Samson (centre) relishes the chance to pack down against Clermont and world champions New ZealandBy Tom BentleyFOUR CONSECUTIVE play-off appearances point to a team consistently vying for the top echelons of French rugby. Yet Castres remain the quiet outsiders as the likes of Clermont and Toulon steal much of the limelight. Christophe Samson is a man who has played at both those clubs and now, at 29, finds himself flourishing at the heart of the Castres pack.“A lot is said of the clubs ahead of us at the moment.Toulon and Clermont are two of the best teams in Europe – they are in the (Heineken Cup) final – so it’s normal that they make the headlines. But we are still making progress in our corner, with the goal of going further than last year,” says the lock.Last year Castres came up short in the Top 14 semi-finals. Samson wasn’t at the club then but was busy playing his part as replacement for veteran Simon Shaw in Toulon’s run to their first championship final in 20 years. In both games though, a mighty Toulouse outfit came out on top.On Saturday, Castres will host fifth-placed Montpellier – the teams’ third consecutive meeting at this stage of the season – after bringing a losing bonus point home from a potential banana-skin encounter at Racing Metro on the last day of the regular league season.“A home quarter-final would be great for us as a team and would also give our supporters a final match to enjoy at Pierre Antoine,” said Samson before the game which Castres lost 29-28. Nevertheless, it was job done. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Castres Olympique’s Christophe Samson (2ndR) is tackled by Stade Francais’ Pascal Pape (2ndL) and Stanley Wright (R) during their French Top 14 rugby union match, on September 8, 2012, at the Charlety stadium in Paris. AFP PHOTO FRANCOIS GUILLOT (Photo credit should read FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP/GettyImages) “They are world champions, have always had iconic players and have been the team to beat in world rugby for a good few years. To play them, especially on their own turf, would be a memorable experience in any rugby man’s career, so I hope to be part of the journey.”He’s already got the French media on his side, with France’s famed rugby paper Midi Olympique awarding him the accolade of Best Player in France for the month of March. It’s an award that he says is testimony to Castres’ season – a season which has just reached the business end.last_img read more

Tonga Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide

first_img Expand The Americans have been building in the right… USA Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Tonga Rugby World Cup GroupTonga are in Group C alongside England, France, Argentina and the USA.Related: 2019 Rugby World Cup GroupsTonga Rugby World Cup FixturesSun 22 Sep England 35-3 Tonga (Sapporo) Match ReportSat 28 Sep Argentina 28-12 Tonga (Osaka) Match ReportSun 6 Oct France 23-21 Tonga (Kumamoto) Match ReportSun 13 Oct USA v Tonga (Osaka) Match Report All you need to know about the Pacific Island side coached by Toutai Kefu England Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide England Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Argentina Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Expand France Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide France Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Collapse TAGS: Tonga LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS USA Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Los Pumas failed to make it to the… After a disastrous home World Cup in 2015,… Expand Four Years On: Soane Tonga’uiha scores against Argentina in 2015 (Getty Images)Tonga Rugby World Cup SquadTonga have announced their squad for the tournament;Siegfried ‘FisiihoiVunipola FifitaLatu ‘TalakaiPaula ‘NgauamoSosefo ‘SakaliaSiua MaileSiua ‘HalanukonukaMa’afu FiaBen TameifunaSam LousiLeva FifitaSitiveni MafiSione KalamafoniMaama ‘VaipuluFotu ‘LokotuiZane ‘KapeliDan FaleafaNasi ManuSonatane TakuluaLeon ‘FukofukaSamisoni FisilauKurt Morath (replaced by Latiume Fosita)James ‘FaivaSiale PiutauMalietoa HinganoNafi TuitavakeAtieli PakalaniDavid HalaifonuaViliami LoloheaCooper VunaTelusa VeainuRelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup FixturesPrevious World Cup Results and RecordTonga’s Rugby World Cup Record: P29 W8 D0 L211987 Pool stages1995 Pool stages1999 Pool stages2003 Pool stages2007 Pool stages2011 Pool stages2015 Pool stages2019 Pool stagesFollow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Tonga Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, GuideTonga had a tough start to the 2019 Rugby World Cup but finished on a high by beating the USA in Osaka.How They QualifiedTonga came second in the Pacific Tri-Nations behind Fiji and as a result qualified for the 2019 World Cup.Key PlayersSonatane Takulua, No 9 and goalkicker, gives them zip and Telusa Veainu has a step to die for. Tonga have also been looking to James Faiva to add a new dimension from fly-half.Quick Step: Telusa Veainu is a tough man to stop (Getty Images)The Coach – Toutai KefuThe former Wallaby No 8 took the reins in 2016 shortly after World Rugby agreed a rescue package for the cash-strapped Tongan union.In charge: Toutai Kefu became coach in 2016 (Getty Images)Major Work-onsThe set-piece is a big area for Tonga to focus on, particularly given that they have Argentina, England and France in their pool.Tonga Rugby World Cup Warm-upsSaturday 27 July 2019: Samoa 25-17 TongaSaturday 3 August 2019: Japan 41-7 TongaFriday 9 August 2019: Tonga 33-23 CanadaSaturday 24 August 2019: Western Force 14-19 TongaSaturday 31 August 2019: Fiji 29-19 TongaSaturday 7 September 2019: New Zealand 92-7 TongaRelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-ups Argentina Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide All you need to know about Les Bleus…last_img read more

Video: New Hampshire Bishop Hirschfeld reflects on Way of the…

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 26, 2013 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem March 28, 2013 at 6:13 pm Very good. Enough of this violence. Now, what is the cause of this violence and how do we stop it?is it guns? There are 300,000,000 guns in this country. Over 3 million of them are AR-15s. There were 9500 homicides done with guns. That’s 0.003%, with a similar proportion committed with all rifles (not just AR-15’s and the like). Seems to me that if guns were the problem that number would be a LOT higher.Perhaps it’s because we teach children that violence solves problems. We suffuse our culture with violence. Quentin Taratino makes movies suffused with blood and mindless violence. Is he shunned by decent people and his films abandoned? No, he is lauded and given a golden statuette. Rappers and hip-hop musicians sing songs filled with exhortations towards violence that sell millions and are given awards. Here in Chicago the 508 killings we had last year – more Americans killed than in the Afghanistan war zone – were killed with handguns by gangsters trying to kill other gangsters, not by law-abiding people with semi-automatic rifles. When a woman gets pregnant and worries about the problems that raising a child will cause, she is permitted to kill it before it’s born – and the State will give her the money to do so if she does not have enough! We stop encouraging marriage and stop condemning single parenthood, calling people who do “conservatives” like it’s a dirty word, and when that child grows up without a father and in poverty (a redundancy) it will join a gang to replace the family it does not have, and the cycle repeats itself.Yes, we DO need to do something about violence. And the first thing we can do is recognize the real causes, abandoning political correctness. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Gun Violence, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ron Fox says: Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN the Rev Canon Mark K J Robinson says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 DC Stations, Comments are closed. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Jobs & Calls Video: New Hampshire Bishop Hirschfeld reflects on Way of the Cross An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Video Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA March 26, 2013 at 6:33 pm The Way of the Cross is a painful journey. The witness which our brothers and sisters have provided for us all is a great testimony to our Lord and Savour. Thank you Jesus for this outward and visible display to what you mean when you remind us, ‘enough’. May we please hold a conversation as to why ‘we need’ these weapons of mass distruction?Thank you all for your commitment in being, ” Jesus in the Streets of Jeresulam as he walked to the Cross”. You did so for all of us. Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (3) Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] Diocese of New Hampshire Bishop Rob Hirschfeld reflects on his participation in the March 25 Way of the Cross procession in a rainy Washington, D.C. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Kevyn Smith says: March 28, 2013 at 10:36 pm Enough! Amen. Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Presiding Bishop issues statement on Syria

first_imgPresiding Bishop issues statement on Syria Comments are closed. September 14, 2013 at 7:17 pm She is right on target. No more violence. Often I am not proud of being an Episcopalian but she changes all of that. Jerry P. Schaertel says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags September 20, 2013 at 2:38 pm I hate war. I remember WW II. John Wayne saved the world. Mom tried to keep her fears from us. None of my uncles died. But they were no longer the men who went off to save the world. As a chaplain during the Nam “conflict” I visited veterans at Ft. Sam Houston hospital. This stirred memories of my first visit to a military hospital ward. The year,1945. The man in front of me smiled. His smile revealed no joy. He left this world long before he died. During Nam, I saw black and white men who looked as if they had been born without arms, legs, and many other body parts. If any one of them survived, I’ll bet he’d tell you about war. Help me out here. Can’t remember. Was it Lee or Grant who said he was afraid of war because he feared he would come to like it too much? I think we’re there. We love war too much. We love the tools of war. Check gun sale profits. Look in your closet. You may see what I see in mine: some kind of gun. God help me/us. Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Rev. Peter De Franco says: Bonniei Leazer says: September 13, 2013 at 5:12 pm What grace-filled commentary on a most difficult international situation, Bishop Schori! I applaud your courage in supporting all alternatives to war and violence in response to the Syrian tragedy.Blessings on your leadership of the Episcopal Church,Father Al September 14, 2013 at 6:05 pm My dear Tom, your lack of respect for the Presiding Bishop’s office to say nothing of her person degrades whatever you might think of her counsel. Robert Renwick says: (The Rev.) Jane Boram says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC September 13, 2013 at 9:10 pm Correction: The last sentences should read:We need a wide-ranging national debate on our role in the world and many other issues, which the 24 hour a day dumbed-down sound-bites cannot adequately cover. Wage peace not greed! September 13, 2013 at 6:28 pm Thanks for your wise counsel, Bishop Schori. I hope you were able to give it to President Obama directly as well as in print. I believe what President Obama wants is to prevent outlawed poison gas from being used against anyone ever again. I hope that can be achieved via diplomacy. The Rev. Tally Bandy says: September 13, 2013 at 5:50 pm Thank you, Bishop Schori. The situation in Syria and surrounding countries has been weighing on my heart and the hearts of my family members, and the of people in my local parish. We will continue to pray for peace. Tom Blair says: John Zachritz says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA September 13, 2013 at 5:08 pm AMEN! Well-stated, Bishop Schori! Thanks for speaking for many of us in the pew & activists in the streets … Shalom & Salaam! – The Rev. Jane Boram – (Christ Church Cathedral -Nashville, TN) Christy Carton says: John Barton says: Charles Sacquety says: September 13, 2013 at 4:28 pm Thank you, Bishop Schori Joe Parrish says: Posted Sep 13, 2013 Albert Pike says: September 14, 2013 at 3:04 am While I am hoping and praying for a peaceful solution and Justice and Peace might embrace in Syria, I have read of persecution of Christians:The London Daily Mail reported Christians in the village of Maaloula claimed Syrian rebels ordered them to convert to Islam on pain of death. The report said opposition forces, including some linked to al-Qaida, gained control of the area.One Maaloula resident, according to the Daily Mail, said the rebels shouted “Allahu Akbar,” or “Allah is supreme, ” when they attacked the Christian homes and churches shortly after moving into the area.One Christian said in the Daily Mail report, “I saw the militants grabbing five villagers and threatening them and saying, ‘Either you convert to Islam, or you will be beheaded.’”The report described Maaloula as a “beautiful mountain village, 25 miles from Damascus.”The report said the historically Christian village had become a key strategic battleground in the Syrian civil warRead more at http://mobile.wnd.com/2013/09/bibles-called-worse-than-chemical-weapons/#yEq5piQ1tJKDKIqb.99 Can’t our Presiding Bishop make any statement of angst , praise, or some form of feeling about fellow Christians enduring martyrdom and persecution for saying “Jesus is Lord!”? September 18, 2013 at 8:25 pm Beloved Presiding Bishop Schori,The clergy clericus in the Episcopal Diocese of Florida read your reflection on the war in Syria.We commend you for your clear message of hope and prayer for the people in Syria as we give thanks for President Obama’s patience and ability to seek a different path rather than being shoved into military bombing as demanded by the Military-Industrial Lobbyists in Congress. The people of Syria did not need more death and destruction. We give thanks that our Congress also is willing to seek a political resolution if at all possible. We pray for peace and justice in Syria! Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY September 13, 2013 at 6:31 pm Mr. Blair… your comments are either more than lousy or less than lousy…. you refer to our Presiding Bishop at “Ms.” Schori… you give yourself away from the first get-go…. Rudeness plus ill-considered RANT adds nothing to one of the Global tragedies of our time, or of any time.. You are full of accusations …?? .. it is not difficult to see which Play Book you are losing your Game by… Thank God, you don’t have anything to do with the resolution of this egregiously tragic set of affairs…. READ her words, Read, mark, learn and inwardly digest a sane and generous statement about the President of the United States of America and the larger complex issues we all face by our Presiding Bishop who can give you lessons in magnanimity…… Peter Meyers says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Peter Meyers says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The situation in Syria continues to evolve.  The death and violence that have been wrought on the Syrian people are a humanitarian tragedy of the first order.  I do not believe further violence is likely to end the tragedy, but rather seems likely to increase or prolong the disaster.  I applaud President Obama’s restraint and willingness to look for diplomatic solutions — changing position requires courage of the first order.  It is a sign of profoundly care-filled leadership both to test the possibility of other, more creative and life-giving solutions and to put the needs of vulnerable populations ahead of one’s own image or reputation.The Episcopal Church and its people continue to pray for the people of Syria, of all religious traditions and none, and we call on the world to help find responses that will result in more abundant life for every citizen of that nation. The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal Church September 13, 2013 at 11:26 pm Thank you, Presiding Bishop Schori. Once again, you have synthesized beautifully a very complicated situation and brought to bear its essential elements. I am so proud of you. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Rev.Dr. Robert D. Askren,Ph.D. says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 September 14, 2013 at 1:00 pm Thanks Bishop for pointing out the need for imagining better solutions than a rush to arms. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rick Bowen says: Middle East, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Lynn Walton says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Rev. Patrick Bone says: September 18, 2013 at 3:35 pm Jerry/ Kirk;Thank you for your well thought out comments in the sea of kool aid. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel W T Wheeler says: Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori September 13, 2013 at 9:02 pm Tom Blair’s ill-informed and disrespectful comments to the contrary, Bishop Schori’s well-measured, perspicuous. and perceptive comment says to me there’s a true pastor watching over the flock that is our beloved Episcopal Church. Kudos to you, Bishop Katharine!I’m amazed at how slow the talking heads here and abroad have been to pick up on the good cop,/bad cop position President Obama and President Putin have taken to goad President al-Assad (bad cop Obama) and to awaken the American people (bad cop Putin). These are two master politicians, capable of thinking outside the box and needing to play to their constituencies.President Obama does not want war. His base is pacific, and he was elected as a war-ending, peace president. He ended the ill-conceived war in Iraq and is in the process of ending the seemingly endless war in Afghanistan. He is dedicated to social justice. He ended torture. He has been successful in overcoming many times opposition to pretty much anything he favors simply because he favors it. I know actions are open to interpretation and others see this differently, but this level of obstructionism says to me, “And to hell with the needs of the country.” Ask yourself when the last time was that you heard anyone refer to the “loyal opposition!” I’m pretty sure I haven’t heard it since the world (including the loyal American part of it) was told, “Either you are with us, or you are with the terrorists.”It is simply too facile to equate Syria with Iraq. I don’t want war. I certainly don’t want my beloved son-in-law to have to risk his life again in the Middle East; AND I can’t abide the slaughter of innocent civilians that make Hitler, Stalin, and Milošević come immediately to mind. We waited while Hitler exterminated Jews, homosexuals, and defectives and while Stalin slaughtered the White Russians. To our credit we intervened earlier in Bosnia-Herzegovina and prevented the loss of hundreds of thousands if not millions of Bosnian Muslims. American death toll WW I: 204,000; American death toll WW II: 670,000. American death toll Bosnia-Herzegovina: 12.If there has to be policing action, Bosnia is by far the better model for the US to follow . Even one American death would be tragic, but then so is each and every death of any Syrian of whatever persuasion. Perhaps we have been numbed by the daily reports of 30 or 100 killed by suicide bomber here, mosques being blown up by Islamists of a different sect there. We are further lulled into a glazed-over mindset by atrocities all over the world., some, sadly, committed by Americans.Perhaps we do need to wake up to the world around us; but as its policeman?! Is it our inevitable role?! We need a wide-ranging national debate or our role in the world and many other issues none of which the 24 hour a day dumbed-down sound-bites cannot cover.Wage peace not greed!center_img Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 September 15, 2013 at 8:32 pm Bishop Schori’s comment suggests that our President is a diplomatic wunder-kinder. Despite her pronouncement, the President wants to militarily intervene in another country’s civil war. At best, this is the new UN ‘R2P’ policy (right to protect) that was first used in Libya to ill effect. A flip comment by the Sec. of State was seized upon by Vladimir Putin and used to make a laughingstock of the President who had painted himself into a corner, had virtually no allies (one French aircraft carrier) and had lost public support. Chemical weapons are foul but the 100,000 dead in Syria died in every kind of way, painful and instantaneous alike. The Russian solution is wildly impractical and the President’s is simply foolish. Bishop Schori is giving credit where none is due and would have done better to remain silent on this most complex issue. Further, I agree with the comment that it is time for Christian leaders of all stripes to speak up about the persecution and outright massacre of Christian in the Middle East and Africa. When that issue shows up on the covers of major news magazines (Time, The Economist) but isn’t even mentioned at General Convention, the Presiding Bishop needs to re-evaluate her thinking. Rector Smithfield, NC September 23, 2013 at 4:40 pm Thank you Bishop Schori. We in the Episcopal church are extremely fortunate to have you as our presiding Bishop. I am proud of you and proud to be an Episcopalian. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments (25) Submit a Press Release September 23, 2013 at 9:07 am Peace brother. We are looking for peaceful solutions and our dialogue should also be peaceful and based upon Christian principles. An excellent statement by the Bishop. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL September 13, 2013 at 6:55 pm Today the New York Times reported that the US stockpile of chemical weapons is three times that of Syria’s, and Russia’s is even larger. Destruction of these very dangerous weapons is imperative for all, including the US and Russia. I pray that the day will come soon when all nations announce they have completely removed these. September 27, 2013 at 3:44 pm Thank you Bishop Schori for your thoughtful words! I just wish more would be said and done about the refugees caused by this conflict. This is a burden that needs to be shared and not ignored. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Kirk Wyss says: September 13, 2013 at 7:11 pm Peter di Franco comments about ‘a decided silence on the just war theory.’ George Clifford, Episcopal priest and ethicist, talks about that here: http://epfnational.org/epf-news/attacking-syria/ September 13, 2013 at 5:21 pm Thank you for your comment, Bishop Schori. There has been a decided silence on the just war theory that should inform the decision to go to war, however limited. Most moral theologians do not see that the diplomatic options have been exhausted. Thank you for drawing attention to the need to continue a diplomatic process. Pax. Featured Events September 13, 2013 at 5:32 pm So well said. Thank you for helping to verbalize my feelings. I’m very proud to be Episcopalian and pray for the people, all the people of the world. Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rev. Jan Kozak says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori has issued the following statement on the situation in Syria. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Donna Hicks says: Dawn Booth says: Russell Ayers+ says: Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA September 13, 2013 at 6:02 pm Are you kidding Ms. Schori? You remind me of the neo-cons. “President Obama’s restraint and willingness to look for diplomatic solutions “! Give me a break! He said he wants war. He added that he feels he has the power (despite explicit wording to the contrary in the Constitution) to make war without the consent of the congress (e.g. the approval of the American people).Stop defending him. He is eager to make war for reasons that may benefit Israel, big Oil, or AIPAC-donations to the DNC – but he has been dragged kicking and screaming (by Vladimir Putin and American public opinion) into a negotiated solution. Thank god – for once peace wins. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

Malawi Anglicans join campaign to end gender violence

first_imgMalawi Anglicans join campaign to end gender violence. Photo: ICRISAT[Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Church in Malawi will this year for the first time be taking part in 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence, described as “organizing strategy by individuals and groups around the world to call for the elimination of all forms of violence against women.”In an interview with ACNS, the coordinator of the Anglican Church’s involvement in the 16 days in the Diocese of Southern Malawi, Fr. Willard Kamandani said, “This is exciting because it is the first time the church in Malawi will be taking part in gender activism issues. Our participation is meant to address the lack of women’s voices in society as well as in the Church.”“It is our expectation that there will be an increase in the percentage of women whose views form part of the society in Malawi,” he said explaining that the decision to participate was made during the 7th Synod of the Diocese of Southern Malawi.Synod members discussed several cross-cutting issues including that of gender imbalances. The Synod’s theme was ‘Let’s challenge militarism and end violence against women’.  They also observed that the low percentage of women’s voices in society is, in part, the result of the Church’s silence on such issues.“As a diocese we thought it wise to take part in the event and resolved that it is the responsibility of the Church to raise awareness among all congregation members as well as the entire country on gender-based violence as a human rights issue,” said Fr. Kamandani.This is not the first time the Anglican Church in Malawi has highlighted important causes. Recently, the Bishop of Northern Malawi the Rt Revd Fanuel Magangani has spoken out on a number of issues affecting the country including the need for its citizens to seriously consider voting rights.Fr. Kamandani explained that using its extensive networks and presence even in the remotest areas of the country, the Church can provide a forum whereby “clergy and laity can develop and share new and effective strategies that can help to end gender-based violence.”“The prevalence rate of violence against women is escalating in the country and hence the need to take part in addressing this issue of gender-based violence,” he said adding, “Remember, we are the voice of the voiceless!”He appealed to Christians and Non-Christians alike to report any cases of violence against women or girls to the police whenever that happened in their families. The Bishop also said that violence against women persists in every district across the country as a “pervasive violation of human rights and major impediment to achieving gender equality and the empowerment of women in our society.”The 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence starts on November 25, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, and ends on December 10, Human Rights Day.The Diocese of Southern Malawi will begin commemorating the event with a march on November 23 from St. Paul’s Cathedral, in the city of Blantyre through Ndirande Township to the Church’s headquarters in Limbe Township, a stretch of about 12 km.Kamandani concluded, “It is…a fact that gender-based violence harms women, their families, men and the entire communities. It has significant economic costs and restricts and undermines economic growth and development.” This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Anglican Communion, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Gender Justice New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY By Bellah ZuluPosted Nov 14, 2013 Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Malawi Anglicans join campaign to end gender violence Submit an Event Listing Tags Africa, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

San Joaquín honra a un pionero del sacerdocio filipino

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Por Pat McCaughan Posted Nov 22, 2014 Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing El Rdo. Justo Andrés y los que asistieron a la celebración en su honor en la iglesia de San Juan, Stockton. Foto de Lewis Gale.[Episcopal News Service] El espíritu misionero innovador del Rdo. Justo Andrés puede ayudar a iniciar un resurgimiento del ministerio filipino en la iglesia episcopal de San Juan Evangelista [Episcopal Church of St. John the Evangelist ] en Stockton, California, según dijera el Rdo. Fred Vergara, misionero del Ministerio Asioamericano de la Iglesia Episcopal.Hace unos 30 años, Andrés fundó la Misión Filipina de la Santa Cruz en San Juan, en la Diócesis Episcopal de San Joaquín, y el 16 de noviembre la comunidad diocesana se reunió para celebrar ese legado y su 85º. cumpleaños, así como las posibilidades de un nuevo ministerio.David Rice, obispo de San Joaquín, ofició en la eucaristía en honor de Andrés y dijo que el oficio conmemoraba el llamado de Andrés en 1983 a la comunidad de Stockton y “el ministerio que él había brindado, el importante lugar que él ostenta en la vida de la Diócesis de San Joaquín y en la comunidad filipina y la forma en que él ha vivido tan fielmente su sacerdocio en medio nuestro.“Esta es una respuesta a nuestro contexto tal como lo hemos visto, experimentado y hemos sido partícipes de él en la zona de Stockton”, añadió Rice. “Creemos que responder a esa parte de nuestro panorama, de nuestra población y de nuestra comunidad, es lo que debe hacerse”.Andrés con frecuencia presidió oficios para obreros migrantes en los campos o para los marinos a bordo de buques transoceánicos que anclaban en el puerto de Stockton. La Misión de la Santa Cruz [Holy Cross Mission] sirvió como una agencia satélite del antiguo Servicio de Inmigración y Naturalización de EE.UU., ayudando a muchos a obtener la ciudadanía norteamericana.Él también sirvió como traductor dentro del sistema judicial de Stockton y fue miembro del comité asesor de la policía.En una entrevista telefónica con Episcopal News Service, Madeline Ruíz, cuñada de Andrés y hablando en su nombre, ya que él padece de sordera debido a la edad, dijo que él se sentía entusiasmado “pero sorprendido por la celebración.“Me preguntó por qué lo honraban”, dijo Ruíz. “Le dije, porque empezaste el ministerio filipino en San Juan y ahora que han recuperado la iglesia quieren hacerte este reconocimiento”.Bajo el liderazgo de Andrés, la congregación de la Santa Cruz floreció e incluyó a filipinos, latinos, personas del sudeste asiático y angloparlantes entre sus miembros. La congregación se dispersó cuando las diferencias teológicas dividieron la diócesis en 2008. La propiedad de San Juan la retuvo un grupo disidente, pero fue devuelta a la Iglesia Episcopal a principios de este año.Rice dijo que la diócesis está contemplando revitalizar su ministerio entre la comunidad filipina. “Estamos apreciando, orando, contemplando, ponderando y reflexionando cómo podemos seguir organizando y desarrollando ese ministerio”.La Rda. Kate Cullinane, canóniga del Ordinario y sacerdote a cargo de San Juan, dijo que alrededor de 200 simpatizantes [de Andrés] habían asistido a la reunión y a una jubilosa recepción que le siguió.La recepción incluyó comida y bailes filipinos tradicionales, así como piezas coreográficas, contó ella. Hubo también serenatas para Andrés, en la que cada uno de los participantes le presentó una flor.“Me encanta que vinieran tantas personas de las vecinas congregaciones filipinas y de las otras congregaciones cercanas del deanato” en apoyo de Andrés y de este oficio, dijo Cullinane en un correo electrónico a ENS.Revivir el ministerio será un esfuerzo de colaboración dentro de la diócesis, agregó. “No vemos esto como un proyecto de San Juan, sino como un proyecto del deanato del norte”.Andrés nació en Bacarra, en la provincia de Ilocos, del Norte de Filipinas, siendo el más pequeño de siete hijos. Se educó en el Seminario Teológico de San Andrés [St. Andrew’s Theological Seminary] y en la Universidad del Extremo Oriente en Manila, y fue ordenado al sacerdocio en 1955 por el Rvdmo. Isabelo Delos Reyes Jr., obispo máximo de la Iglesia Independiente Filipina.Su primera asignación parroquial fue en la ciudad de Ozamiz, en la sureña región filipina de Mindanao, antes de aceptar un llamado a Maui. Él se encontró entre un trío de sacerdotes que fueron parte de la primera oleada de sacerdotes filipinos llamados a la Iglesia Episcopal.Otros dos sacerdotes, el Rdo. Timoteo Quintero y el Rdo. Jacinto Tabili, también aceptaron llamados a servir en Hawái. Quintero fundó la iglesia de San Pablo en Honolulú y Tabili prestó servicios en Hilo, la isla mayor de Hawái, pero luego regreso para convertirse en obispo en las Filipinas, según explicó Vergara. A principio de los años sesenta, a Andrés lo llamaron a servir en la iglesia del Buen Pastor [Good Shepherd Church] en Wailuku, en la isla de Maui.En 1983, Andrés aceptó un llamado a servir en San Juan, Stockton. Él es el único superviviente de la primera oleada de pastores filipinos que trabajaron con la Iglesia Episcopal, dijo Vergara. Raquel Nancy Andrés, su esposa y compañera en el ministerio, falleció en 2009.Vergara, que predicó en la eucaristía del 16 de noviembre, resaltó que San Juan fue organizada al año siguiente de que se fundara Sockton y desempeñó un papel fundamental en el desarrollo de ese municipio californiano, agregó.Los asiáticos y provenientes de las islas del Pacifico componen el 22 por ciento de los 300.000 residentes de Stockton, según datos del Censo de EE.UU. de 2013.“Nos reunimos aquí hoy en nombre de Cristo para atestiguar la obra de creación y recreación de Dios”, dijo Vergara a los asistentes al oficio bilingüe en San Juan.“En esta hermosa ciudad de Stockton, Dios comenzará su obra con ustedes y conmigo. Juntos, seremos el instrumento de Dios para empezar el resurgimiento, la renovación y la re-creación de San Juan.“Este es el reto para nosotros, redescubrir el tesoro que hay en San Juan e invertir nuestros talentos en orar por el resurgimiento del destino de Stockton”, afirmo.“Así como su historia está vinculada a la de Stockton, así el resurgimiento de Stockton está vinculado al resurgimiento de San Juan —y el destino de Stockton está vinculado al de San Juan. Al resurgimiento espiritual de San Juan, le seguirá el resurgimiento de Stockton en paz, progreso y prosperidad”.–La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group San Joaquín honra a un pionero del sacerdocio filipino La diócesis contempla un ministerio revitalizado Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CAlast_img read more

Services will mark 70 years since atomic bombs ended World…

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted Aug 6, 2015 Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Scott Smith says: Comments (10) Ron Davin says: Doug Desper says: Ed Lane says: August 6, 2015 at 4:59 pm Too bad this article doesn’t mention the tender mercies of the Japanese in such places as Pearl Harbor, the Bataan Death March, the murder of Wake Island prisoners, the murder of priests and the rape of nuns but to mention a few. The Japanese were given many chances to quit but wouldn’t do it. Before too many pile on here, stop and ask yourself how many of your relatives would have been killed if the war had not stopped. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC August 6, 2015 at 3:39 pm At least the firebombing of Tokyo stopped, saving Japanese lives at least Nanchang was over, at least a Soviet invasion of Japan was limited to several small islands, at least American soldiers were not taken out of Europe to be killed in Asia. A huge, terrible price was paid, but the deaths all but stopped. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Robert Ricker says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 August 6, 2015 at 10:17 pm Many years ago when I was a university student here in Austin, we would go to the river on Hiroshima/Nagasaki remembrance day and, after sundown, release hundreds of candles in paper boats at the confluence of the Colorado River and Barton Creek. In 2005 on the 60th anniversary, Dr. Satoru Konishi an A-bomb survivor spoke his haunting poetry here in Austin. This year, I am ashamed to say, I did not remember the day until the ENS email landed in my inbox. As Dr. Konishi has written, “we must never repeat this tragedy, this hell of nuclear war. . .” Mary Frances Schjonberg has included a short but informative video with her story. Parents, show this to your children and teachers show this to your students. And for us older students, take a few minutes to google Dr. Satoru Konishi about his experiences as a 16 year old working in a Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945 three miles from ground zero. We must never forget. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ron Davin says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA August 17, 2015 at 8:20 pm It seems the use of this device saved the lives of many , not all of the P.O.W.S. that were about to liquidated in just a few days.The use of this device saved the lives of many, not all, of the P.O.W.S. that were about to be taken as the Allied troops advanced. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID August 6, 2015 at 5:50 pm As an Episcopalian, after studying the issue, I have rejected the common perception in the US that these bombs saved innumerable American lives by eliminating the need for an invasion of japan. There was no need of an invasion of the home islands of Japan, they were a defeated foe, and had no effective means to fight. Even initial refusal of surrender would have not necessitate invasion, a blockade certainly would have led to swift capitulation. Another factor was Russian entry into the Pacific war. Japan would have quickly surrendered for fear of Russian postwar involvement in Japan’s affairs.The use of these horrific weapons of mass destruction was an immoral act. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Anglican Communion Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET james r. adams says: Submit a Press Release August 8, 2015 at 5:12 am No Mr. Morris, you are wrong. It is well documented that an invasion would have been required, and that many Americans would have perished. Frankly, in war, it is better to make 120,000 enemy perish than even 1 American. That is what war is. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab August 7, 2015 at 3:05 pm You need to reread your history. Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest August 7, 2015 at 4:09 pm I agree with Joel’s worldly logic. In addition, Jesus said, “Love your enemies” and “Do not resist an evil person” without exceptions, even if it results in our deaths or enslavement.http://www.kingdomofgodflag.info Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. [Anglican Communion News Service] Commemorations to mark VJ Day – the end of the Second World War in the Pacific – have tended to be a lesser commemoration, in Britain at least, than VE Day – the end of the Second World War in Europe.It is also because it is very difficult to “celebrate” the end of a war where victory was wrought with the loss of 120,000 people who were victims of the first two – and, so far, only two – atomic bombs used.But that is exactly what happened: the first bomb killed 80,000 people when it was detonated over the Japanese city of Hiroshima on Aug. 6 1945; and on Aug. 9, 1945 40,000 people were killed when a similar bomb was detonated over Nagasaki. Tens of thousands more would die of radiation poisoning in the weeks, months and years ahead.On Aug. 15, 1945, the Japanese leader, Emperor Hirohito, announced his country’s unconditional surrender in a radio address, saying the decision had been made because of the devastating power of “a new and most cruel bomb.”The first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima Aug. 6, 1945 (left). The second was dropped on Nagasaki Aug. 9, 1945. Photo: Wikimedia CommonsIn Britain, to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of the war, the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh will join veterans, former prisoners of war and civilian internees at St Martin-in-the-Fields Church in Trafalgar Square, London, for a commemorative service organized by the National Far East Prisoners of War Fellowship Welfare Remembrance Association.The 70th anniversary of the end of the war is seen as a “very important” occasion by the Anglican Church in Japan, the Nippon Sei Ko Kai (NSKK).“While the war ended with the defeat of Japan, about 20 million people in several Asian/Pacific countries including Japan were victims,” the NSKK House of Bishops said in a statement. “Pain and suffering brought by sacrifices and damage of this war have not yet healed even after 70 years.“We especially bear in mind that our country has not been able to make reconciliation and peace with the countries we invaded.“In this year of the 70th anniversary of the end of the war, we pray for those who were victims of this war and who are still feeling the effects of pain, suffering, and sorrow, and we reaffirm our commitment to the future peace of the world.”The Hiroshima Peace Park includes the Peace Museum and the skeletal remains of the Hiroshima Prefectural Commercial Exhibition hall. Completed in 1915, the hall was the only building left standing near bomb’s hypocenter. It soon became known as the Atomic Bomb Dome and is formally the Hiroshima Peace Memorial. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceIn 1995, the NSKK “admitted our war responsibility, based on repentance and looking toward the 21st century,” the bishops said. “We determined to walk with those who were historically persecuted and victimized during the war and are still discriminated against.”In the following year, the NSKK Synod adopted the Province’s “Statement on War Responsibility” in which all churches agreed to collectively share NSKK’s war responsibility, to convey an apology in the name of Nippon Sei Ko Kai to the churches in the countries which Japan had invaded, and to start and continue a program in each diocese and parish “to review the historical facts and to deepen our understanding of the Gospel.”“We have strived to establish collaborative relationships with Asian churches, especially the Anglican Church of Korea and the Episcopal Church in the Philippines,” the bishops say, “and have committed to support the Okinawan struggle for peace and human rights.“We reaffirm that peace and reconciliation in the entire East Asian area, including a peaceful reunion of North and South Korea and the establishment of a more peaceful Okinawa will continuously be important issues in the missionary work of Nippon Sei Ko Kai, and will continue our efforts to achieve these goals.”In June, the bishops of the NSKK gathered in Okinawa to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of the end of battle there in which more than 200,000 people were killed. And they will gather again in Hiroshima on Aug. 6 and in Nagasaki on Aug. 9 for requiems in memory of the dead.A cenotaph for Korean victims of the atomic bombings is in the Hiroshima Peace Park. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceIn a sign of reconciliation, Archbishop Paul Kim and a number of other bishops from the Anglican Church of Korea and some other bishops from Korea will also attend the requiems.Japan annexed Korea in 1910 and held the peninsula until 1945. Some estimates say that 700,000 Korean civilians — including teenage girls — were brought to Japan through coercion before and during the war to work. Many other thousands were forced to into hard labor or conscripted. It is estimated that at least 45,000 Koreans were among the more than 2000,000 who were killed in the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, or were exposed to lethal post-blast radiation. In addition, 300,000 Korean survivors were returned to Korea after WWII ended Japan’s colonization of Korea.In the post-war Era, Japan adopted a “peace constitution” which committed the country to pacifism. This is now at risk through the introduction of new security bills through the Diet – the Japanese Parliament, which would allow for “collective self-defense.” (News, 22 July). The NSKK is opposing the move.“We have the Peace Constitution which denounces the war, and because of this Peace Constitution, Japan has never been involved in war and has killed no one for the past 70 years,” the Most Rev. Nathaniel Makoto Uematsu, the Primate of Japan, told ACNS.“Right now, the Japanese government is trying to modify the Peace Constitution so that Japan could play an active role in war and conflict in the world using military force in future. We, the NSKK, are working hard to stop this government’s policy.” Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Laurie Eiserloh says: August 7, 2015 at 7:36 pm Our time and the absence of war-time deprivation is a safe distance to critique those before us. We moderns find comfort and satisfaction to safely calculate into easily understood distinctions, especially those before us whom we often sense were somehow inferior. (Lately the neatness of Confederate bigots and Union heroes). Now, many look back on WWII with wiser thoughts about how immoral it was. Of course it was. Total war was all that Japan could understand in that era of the Code of Bushido. Only total overpowering defeat would hope to stop the madness of that war. Even when Hirohito surrendered there were still officers who wanted to continue the war. Each side knew of secret weapons the others were developing and there was the urgency to be the first to end the madness with new weapons before others used their own in conquest. The age of Google and Instagram had not arrived. Information was truly only for the few “in the know” and fear and rumors abounded. Let’s not forget that Russia was working its designs to go conquer territory outside its borders. The Japanese of the 1930s – 1940s were the merciless foe who carried out the Rape of Nan King, butchery in the Philippines, the Bataan Death March, and much more – not the least of which was the unprovoked attack on December 7th and following. Their Code of Bushido was and is akin to the pitiless code used by modern-day ISIS. Neither recognize the Geneva Code of War. The torture of my great-Uncle was my personal evidence of that. Was the atom bomb immoral? Yes. To crush the warrior code of Bushido only overwhelming force would do. After our brutal act the Japanese finally renounced that code — after 400 long years. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books August 14, 2015 at 4:40 pm Had the A-bombs not been dropped causing the Japanese surrender, the USA would have faced the invasions of Japan, called Operation Downfall, and its 2 invasions, Olympic and Coronet. Reading information about those plans is a stark revelation of the horrors the US forces, and Japanese people and soldiers, would have faced. One example: the Japanese had “saved” 10,000 “Zeros” to use as kamikazes slated to attack only USA invasion troop ships which represented a change in tactics with estimates of the destruction of one-third to one-half of the USA troop ships. The A-bombs were terrible but frankly represented the least destructive option to avoid the terrific losses the USA and Japan would have endured. James R. Adams, Covington KY, Trinity Church Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Joel Morris says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ed Lane says: Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Services will mark 70 years since atomic bombs ended World War II Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

Groundbreaking document shows how Anglicans and Roman Catholics can learn…

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Anglican Communion News Service] An agreed statement produced by the official commission for dialogue between the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches has been heralded as “ground-breaking” and an “important step on the pilgrimage towards fuller unity in Christ.”Read the entire article here. Rector Albany, NY Tags Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ecumenical & Interreligious Groundbreaking document shows how Anglicans and Roman Catholics can learn from each other Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Jul 4, 2018 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more