Services will mark 70 years since atomic bombs ended World…

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted Aug 6, 2015 Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Scott Smith says: Comments (10) Ron Davin says: Doug Desper says: Ed Lane says: August 6, 2015 at 4:59 pm Too bad this article doesn’t mention the tender mercies of the Japanese in such places as Pearl Harbor, the Bataan Death March, the murder of Wake Island prisoners, the murder of priests and the rape of nuns but to mention a few. The Japanese were given many chances to quit but wouldn’t do it. Before too many pile on here, stop and ask yourself how many of your relatives would have been killed if the war had not stopped. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC August 6, 2015 at 3:39 pm At least the firebombing of Tokyo stopped, saving Japanese lives at least Nanchang was over, at least a Soviet invasion of Japan was limited to several small islands, at least American soldiers were not taken out of Europe to be killed in Asia. A huge, terrible price was paid, but the deaths all but stopped. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Robert Ricker says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 August 6, 2015 at 10:17 pm Many years ago when I was a university student here in Austin, we would go to the river on Hiroshima/Nagasaki remembrance day and, after sundown, release hundreds of candles in paper boats at the confluence of the Colorado River and Barton Creek. In 2005 on the 60th anniversary, Dr. Satoru Konishi an A-bomb survivor spoke his haunting poetry here in Austin. This year, I am ashamed to say, I did not remember the day until the ENS email landed in my inbox. As Dr. Konishi has written, “we must never repeat this tragedy, this hell of nuclear war. . .” Mary Frances Schjonberg has included a short but informative video with her story. Parents, show this to your children and teachers show this to your students. And for us older students, take a few minutes to google Dr. Satoru Konishi about his experiences as a 16 year old working in a Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945 three miles from ground zero. We must never forget. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ron Davin says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA August 17, 2015 at 8:20 pm It seems the use of this device saved the lives of many , not all of the P.O.W.S. that were about to liquidated in just a few days.The use of this device saved the lives of many, not all, of the P.O.W.S. that were about to be taken as the Allied troops advanced. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID August 6, 2015 at 5:50 pm As an Episcopalian, after studying the issue, I have rejected the common perception in the US that these bombs saved innumerable American lives by eliminating the need for an invasion of japan. There was no need of an invasion of the home islands of Japan, they were a defeated foe, and had no effective means to fight. Even initial refusal of surrender would have not necessitate invasion, a blockade certainly would have led to swift capitulation. Another factor was Russian entry into the Pacific war. Japan would have quickly surrendered for fear of Russian postwar involvement in Japan’s affairs.The use of these horrific weapons of mass destruction was an immoral act. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Anglican Communion Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET james r. adams says: Submit a Press Release August 8, 2015 at 5:12 am No Mr. Morris, you are wrong. It is well documented that an invasion would have been required, and that many Americans would have perished. Frankly, in war, it is better to make 120,000 enemy perish than even 1 American. That is what war is. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab August 7, 2015 at 3:05 pm You need to reread your history. Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest August 7, 2015 at 4:09 pm I agree with Joel’s worldly logic. In addition, Jesus said, “Love your enemies” and “Do not resist an evil person” without exceptions, even if it results in our deaths or enslavement.http://www.kingdomofgodflag.info Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. [Anglican Communion News Service] Commemorations to mark VJ Day – the end of the Second World War in the Pacific – have tended to be a lesser commemoration, in Britain at least, than VE Day – the end of the Second World War in Europe.It is also because it is very difficult to “celebrate” the end of a war where victory was wrought with the loss of 120,000 people who were victims of the first two – and, so far, only two – atomic bombs used.But that is exactly what happened: the first bomb killed 80,000 people when it was detonated over the Japanese city of Hiroshima on Aug. 6 1945; and on Aug. 9, 1945 40,000 people were killed when a similar bomb was detonated over Nagasaki. Tens of thousands more would die of radiation poisoning in the weeks, months and years ahead.On Aug. 15, 1945, the Japanese leader, Emperor Hirohito, announced his country’s unconditional surrender in a radio address, saying the decision had been made because of the devastating power of “a new and most cruel bomb.”The first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima Aug. 6, 1945 (left). The second was dropped on Nagasaki Aug. 9, 1945. Photo: Wikimedia CommonsIn Britain, to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of the war, the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh will join veterans, former prisoners of war and civilian internees at St Martin-in-the-Fields Church in Trafalgar Square, London, for a commemorative service organized by the National Far East Prisoners of War Fellowship Welfare Remembrance Association.The 70th anniversary of the end of the war is seen as a “very important” occasion by the Anglican Church in Japan, the Nippon Sei Ko Kai (NSKK).“While the war ended with the defeat of Japan, about 20 million people in several Asian/Pacific countries including Japan were victims,” the NSKK House of Bishops said in a statement. “Pain and suffering brought by sacrifices and damage of this war have not yet healed even after 70 years.“We especially bear in mind that our country has not been able to make reconciliation and peace with the countries we invaded.“In this year of the 70th anniversary of the end of the war, we pray for those who were victims of this war and who are still feeling the effects of pain, suffering, and sorrow, and we reaffirm our commitment to the future peace of the world.”The Hiroshima Peace Park includes the Peace Museum and the skeletal remains of the Hiroshima Prefectural Commercial Exhibition hall. Completed in 1915, the hall was the only building left standing near bomb’s hypocenter. It soon became known as the Atomic Bomb Dome and is formally the Hiroshima Peace Memorial. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceIn 1995, the NSKK “admitted our war responsibility, based on repentance and looking toward the 21st century,” the bishops said. “We determined to walk with those who were historically persecuted and victimized during the war and are still discriminated against.”In the following year, the NSKK Synod adopted the Province’s “Statement on War Responsibility” in which all churches agreed to collectively share NSKK’s war responsibility, to convey an apology in the name of Nippon Sei Ko Kai to the churches in the countries which Japan had invaded, and to start and continue a program in each diocese and parish “to review the historical facts and to deepen our understanding of the Gospel.”“We have strived to establish collaborative relationships with Asian churches, especially the Anglican Church of Korea and the Episcopal Church in the Philippines,” the bishops say, “and have committed to support the Okinawan struggle for peace and human rights.“We reaffirm that peace and reconciliation in the entire East Asian area, including a peaceful reunion of North and South Korea and the establishment of a more peaceful Okinawa will continuously be important issues in the missionary work of Nippon Sei Ko Kai, and will continue our efforts to achieve these goals.”In June, the bishops of the NSKK gathered in Okinawa to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of the end of battle there in which more than 200,000 people were killed. And they will gather again in Hiroshima on Aug. 6 and in Nagasaki on Aug. 9 for requiems in memory of the dead.A cenotaph for Korean victims of the atomic bombings is in the Hiroshima Peace Park. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceIn a sign of reconciliation, Archbishop Paul Kim and a number of other bishops from the Anglican Church of Korea and some other bishops from Korea will also attend the requiems.Japan annexed Korea in 1910 and held the peninsula until 1945. Some estimates say that 700,000 Korean civilians — including teenage girls — were brought to Japan through coercion before and during the war to work. Many other thousands were forced to into hard labor or conscripted. It is estimated that at least 45,000 Koreans were among the more than 2000,000 who were killed in the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, or were exposed to lethal post-blast radiation. In addition, 300,000 Korean survivors were returned to Korea after WWII ended Japan’s colonization of Korea.In the post-war Era, Japan adopted a “peace constitution” which committed the country to pacifism. This is now at risk through the introduction of new security bills through the Diet – the Japanese Parliament, which would allow for “collective self-defense.” (News, 22 July). The NSKK is opposing the move.“We have the Peace Constitution which denounces the war, and because of this Peace Constitution, Japan has never been involved in war and has killed no one for the past 70 years,” the Most Rev. Nathaniel Makoto Uematsu, the Primate of Japan, told ACNS.“Right now, the Japanese government is trying to modify the Peace Constitution so that Japan could play an active role in war and conflict in the world using military force in future. We, the NSKK, are working hard to stop this government’s policy.” Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Laurie Eiserloh says: August 7, 2015 at 7:36 pm Our time and the absence of war-time deprivation is a safe distance to critique those before us. We moderns find comfort and satisfaction to safely calculate into easily understood distinctions, especially those before us whom we often sense were somehow inferior. (Lately the neatness of Confederate bigots and Union heroes). Now, many look back on WWII with wiser thoughts about how immoral it was. Of course it was. Total war was all that Japan could understand in that era of the Code of Bushido. Only total overpowering defeat would hope to stop the madness of that war. Even when Hirohito surrendered there were still officers who wanted to continue the war. Each side knew of secret weapons the others were developing and there was the urgency to be the first to end the madness with new weapons before others used their own in conquest. The age of Google and Instagram had not arrived. Information was truly only for the few “in the know” and fear and rumors abounded. Let’s not forget that Russia was working its designs to go conquer territory outside its borders. The Japanese of the 1930s – 1940s were the merciless foe who carried out the Rape of Nan King, butchery in the Philippines, the Bataan Death March, and much more – not the least of which was the unprovoked attack on December 7th and following. Their Code of Bushido was and is akin to the pitiless code used by modern-day ISIS. Neither recognize the Geneva Code of War. The torture of my great-Uncle was my personal evidence of that. Was the atom bomb immoral? Yes. To crush the warrior code of Bushido only overwhelming force would do. After our brutal act the Japanese finally renounced that code — after 400 long years. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books August 14, 2015 at 4:40 pm Had the A-bombs not been dropped causing the Japanese surrender, the USA would have faced the invasions of Japan, called Operation Downfall, and its 2 invasions, Olympic and Coronet. Reading information about those plans is a stark revelation of the horrors the US forces, and Japanese people and soldiers, would have faced. One example: the Japanese had “saved” 10,000 “Zeros” to use as kamikazes slated to attack only USA invasion troop ships which represented a change in tactics with estimates of the destruction of one-third to one-half of the USA troop ships. The A-bombs were terrible but frankly represented the least destructive option to avoid the terrific losses the USA and Japan would have endured. James R. Adams, Covington KY, Trinity Church Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Joel Morris says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ed Lane says: Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Services will mark 70 years since atomic bombs ended World War II Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img

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