Cherono’s final sprint wins Boston Marathon

first_imgCherono’s final sprint wins Boston Marathon Ethiopia’s Degefa breaks away to win women’s race “I was afraid of the guy who won two years ago. After he dropped out, I decided to win,” said Desisa, who did not finish in either of the last two years. “I tried at the last, I saw (Cherono) suddenly, then I couldn’t control the pace.”A field of 30,000 runners followed the elites, ditching their trash bags and ponchos on the Hopkinton Green before embarking on the 26.2-mile trek from Hopkinton to Copley Square. It’s the first time the race has been run on April 15 since the 2013 attacks; officials held a ceremony at 2:49 p.m. to honor those killed and maimed by the two pressure cooker bombs that exploded near the finish line.Daniel Romanchuk, 20, became the youngest-ever men’s wheelchair champion in Boston, finishing in 1:21:36 for the fastest time ever for an American. Manuela Schar won the women’s wheelchair race for the second time, adding it to her titles in in Berlin, Chicago, New York and Tokyo.If she wins in London in two weeks, she will have swept the World Marathon Major series. Published: April 15, 2019, 9:33am Share: By JIMMY GOLEN, Associated Press “I was just really happy that the weather turned out to be actually really nice,” said Schar, who set a course record in 2017. “When we drove to that starting line, it looked really really bad and I was worried because last year was still in our heads, and I had a really bad experience last year. Today I would say (was) unfinished business.” Receive latest stories and local news in your email: Follow The Columbian on Instagram Lawrence Cherono, of Kenya, hits the tape to win the 123rd Boston Marathon in front of Lelisa Desisa, of Ethiopia, right, on Monday, April 15, 2019, in Boston. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson) Photo Gallery Followcenter_img Worknesh Degefa broke away from defending champion Des Linden and the rest of the women’s pack in the Framingham flats and ran alone for the last 20 miles to claim the $150,000 first prize and a gilded olive wreath from Marathon, Greece.The 28-year-old Ethiopian, who set a national record while finishing second in Dubai less than three months ago, won in 2:23:31. Kenya’s Edna Kiplagat was second, reducing a gap of more than two minutes to 42 seconds at the finish.American Jordan Hasay was third and Linden was fifth.“Seeing Degefa go out — you know her ability, you know what she’s done and you wonder how it translates to this course,” Linden said. “But when she starts putting down those super quick miles, you say ‘All right, this is her race to lose.’ She becomes the outlier and you let her just go and hope that she might come back.”She didn’t.Instead, she became the eighth Ethiopian woman to win the race and the third in seven years. A half marathon specialist, Degefa had never seen the Boston course before Monday. GO BOSTON — Two-time Boston Marathon champion Lelisa Desisa turned onto Boylston Street with a sliver of a lead, leaning in front of two other runners with the finish line in sight.Unfortunately for him, one of them was the fastest man in the field.Lawrence Cherono needed every bit of his speed to outkick Desisa in a sprint to the tape on Monday, passing him just steps away from the finishline to win the 123rd Boston Marathon in 2 hours, 7 minutes 57 seconds.Desisa, who won in 2015 and 2013, the year the race was overshadowed by a bombing at the finish line, eased up after realizing he was beaten and finished 2 seconds back. Kenneth Kipkemoi was third, another 8 seconds behind, one of seven Kenyans in the top 10.“It was no man’s race to win,” said Cherono, who had won in Seville, Prague, Honolulu and twice in Amsterdam but never in a major marathon before. “I kept on focusing. And at the end, I was the winner. I’m so grateful, so happy.” By signing up you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service. Worknesh Degefa, left, of Ethiopia, winner of the women’s division, and Lawrence Cherono, right, of Kenya, winner of the men’s division of the 123rd Boston Marathon, hold the trophy at the finish line on Monday, April 15, 2019, in Boston. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson) Photo “Last year, I watched all the marathon coverage,” she said. “I kept that in my mind.”One year after an icy rain and a near-gale headwind resulted in the slowest winning times in four decades, race organizers again prepared for the foul New England weather. But overnight thunderstorms moved on before the runners left Hopkinton; the sun even made an appearance about halfway through.Linden took advantage of last year’s storm to splash her way to the first win for an American woman since 1985.But with conditions back to normal, so were the results: East Africans from Kenya and Ethiopia dominating the podiums. At the 30K mark the lead pack was still close to a dozen and included three of the last four champions: Desisa, 2016 winner Geoffrey Kirui and ’17 champ Lemi Berhanu Hayle. Share: 4 Photoslast_img read more

Britain slumps to bottom of cancer survival league tables – and is

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. But the lag between the UK and some of the other countries is so large that for some cancers it is two decades behind.  Britain’s five-year survival rates for stomach cancer are 20.8 per cent – worse than those of Norway, Canada, Australia and New Zealand two decades before. The best-performing country, Australia, now has five-year survival at 32.8 per cent, a gap that has widened since the study began. For ovarian cancer, UK five-year survival is 37.1 per cent – on a par with Norway’s rates twenty years before. In Norway, survival is now 46.2 per cent.  For bowel cancer, UK survival is 58.9 per cent, compared with 70.1 per cent in Australia. Latest rates in Britain are worse than the rates in Australia or New Zealand in the 1990s. Survival rates from pancreatic cancer are almost half of those in Australia, at 7.9 per cent, compared with those of 14.6 per cent in Australia. And UK lung cancer survival rates are now 14.7 per cent – worse than those in Canada 20 years before.  The lag comes despite improvements in cancer survival in the UK, following repeated attempts to ensure patients are diagnosed sooner. The greatest improvements were seen in rectal cancer, where five-year survival rose by 14.3 per cent over the period, with an 11.9 per cent improvement seen for bowel cancer. In June a study by Cancer Research UK found two in three cases of cancer are not being picked up by GPs. The vast majority of cases that turned out to be cancer were never suspected by family doctors, so were not given an urgent referral.The study found that just 37 per cent of all cancer diagnoses in England involved patients who had been given an urgent referral by their GP, because the disease was suspected. Just 32 per cent of diagnoses for bowel cancer and 28 per cent of diagnoses for lung cancer were identified this way.Without a referral, patients with bowel cancer waited an average of 61 days for a diagnosis, five weeks longer than the cases that were suspected by GPs.The new research was carried out by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, a WHO agency.  Sara Hiom, Cancer Research UK’s director of early diagnosis, said: “We really need to redouble our efforts on early diagnosis.”She said GPs were still missing too many cases, and even when cancer was suspected, shortages of hospital staff meant long delays for a diagnosis. “GPs are strapped for time and don’t always take the right history and ask enough questions to take the right referral route,” she said. “The UK tends to diagnose later than comparable countries and one of the key reasons is a lack of diagnostic capacity – in particular shortages in the workforce, of endcosopists, of radiologists and radiographers and of pathologists.” Around half of all cancers are diagnosed at stage three or four, when disease has spread and is more difficult to treat. Last year then Prime Minister Theresa May pledged to ensure that within a decade, three in four Britons with cancer are diagnosed at an earlier point.But key NHS cancer targets have been repeatedly missed, with a flagship target to treat patients within two months not achieved since 2013, official records show.From next year, patients have been promised a diagnosis or all-clear within 28 days.A spokesman for the NHS said: “This report is based on out of date data and in the five years since the study’s research ends, cancer survival has actually hit a record high, thanks to improvements in NHS cancer services, including the introduction of revolutionary treatments like proton beam therapy and immunotherapy.”The NHS Long Term Plan will build on this progress by ramping up action to spot more cancers at the earliest possible stage when the chance of survival is higher, saving tens of thousands more lives every year.”A Department of Health and Social Care spokesman said: “Cancer survival rates are at a record high, but we are determined to go further and save even more lives. Through our NHS Long Term Plan  we will detect more cancers at an earlier stage, saving an estimated 55,000 lives a year.” Britain is bottom of international league tables for cancer survival – and is lagging two decades behind some countries for some types of disease – a global study shows. The research on almost four million patients by the World Health Organisation (WHO) shows improvements have failed to keep pace with those in other comparable countries. The 20 year study shows that patients in Britain have the lowest survival rates for five out of seven common cancers. Despite improvements across all countries, the UK’s relative position now is significantly worse than when the study started in the 90s, when it fared worst for three out of seven cancers.Britain is now bottom of the table for bowel, lung, stomach pancreatic and rectal cancer, second worst for oesophageal disease and in third worst position for ovarian cancer. It follows British research which found that two in three cases of disease are not being picked up by GPs. The new study, which covers the period from 2010 to 2014, published in The Lancet Oncology, shows significant improvements across all seven high income countries which were tracked.   read more