Stranger Things 3 reviews are out Best season by leaps and bounds

first_img TV and Movies i really loved new #StrangerThings but i’m most excited for everyone to see it and fall madly in love with maya hawke, who is just wonderful. she stole the season for me. pic.twitter.com/66UajQQ1yo— lindsey romain (@lindseyromain) July 1, 2019 So there’s not much more I can say, but I was so impressed with the way specific ships sailed & laughed out loud at least once per episode (mostly at DAD Hopper). Also a shopping scene 🥰 #strangerthings— Emily Longeretta (@emilylongeretta) June 30, 2019 1 Stranger Things is looking good. Netflix Things are about to get Strange. The third season of Netflix’s hit series Stranger Things arrives on July 4, and while it may be a stressful summer in Hawkins, Indiana, it’s looking like a great one for fans. The embargo for reviews lifted on Sunday, and critics shared their opinions.  Now playing: Watch this: I think I can finally tell you that #StrangerThings is the show’s best season yet. It’s not perfect (more on that later) but there are moments that are so good, so funny, so deeply heartfelt that it will leave you breathless. It’s also spectacularly gross and I loved it.— Crystal Bell (@crystalbell) June 30, 2019 We know from the recent final trailer that Billy (Dacre Montgomery) could be the target of some Upside Down evil this season. But apparently he’s also a great character this year. “Billy f****** owns,” Colburn writes. Look at this baller piece of clothing pic.twitter.com/bbwhkjQLTI— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 Now that I’ve seen some of #StrangerThings I am not only hit with a huge powerful wave of nostalgia (I was 9 in 1985) I am seriously wondering if we’ll see the absolute worst 80s fashion come back in style. Again.— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 i’ve watched #StrangerThings twice now and i think people who already hate it will find even more to hate but i truly believe the show transcends its inelegant ’80s pop culture flirtations with top-notch character work and archetypal subversion. billy fucking owns.— Randall Colburn (@randallcolburn) June 30, 2019 See all the Stranger Things season 3 photos And CNET sister site ComicBook.com says the 1980s references are just too much. “It’s entertaining to see beloved characters embracing the spirit of goofy ’80s films, but these homages feel so blatant that it feels more like a parody than a tribute,” the ComicBook review reads.Character critiquesThere will be plenty of familiar faces and a few new ones in Hawkins this season. Who stands out? She’s not alone in calling this season the best so far. Randall Colburn, internet culture editor for The AV Club, calls season 3 the show’s “best season by leaps and bounds.” Stranger Things 3 a brilliant return to form Share your voice To Lindsey Romain of Nerdist, the standout is 20-year-old Maya Hawke (yes, real-life daughter of Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman), who plays new character Robin, who apparently works with Steve at Scoops Ahoy, the ice-cream shop in Starcourt Mall. “She stole the season for me,” Romain writes. it’s the best season by leaps and bounds— Randall Colburn (@randallcolburn) June 30, 2019center_img It’s what fans wanted to hear. CNET’s own Jennifer Bisset calls season 3 “a brilliant return to form,” adding that it brings the focus back to the elements that made the first season such an unexpected hit. “This season’s sense of fun, along with its relationship drama and multiple odd pair-ups bring humor and touching moments that recall Game of Thrones at its best,” she writes.MTVNews culture director Crystal Bell tweeted, “I think I can finally tell you that #StrangerThings is the show’s best season yet.” Wrote about the new season of #StrangerThings, which is basically a love letter to old-school tech, shopping malls &, of course, dope retro fits & wild haircuts. The Duffer Brothers did it again: best season yet. (Fret not, didn’t spoil the sauce for you.) https://t.co/pBJ9lcm78S— Edgar Alvarez (@abcdedgar) June 30, 2019 And Police Chief Jim Hopper brings the laughs, according to Emily Longeretta of Us Weekly, who says she “laughed out loud at least once per episode (mostly at DAD Hopper).” Some of the humor in #StrangerThings this season is very broad – too broad, especially early on. On the other hand, this felt like the goriest season yet, which, of course, I was very happy about. I had a couple “oh, I probably shouldn’t be eating right now” moments. Yay, gore!— Eric Goldman (@TheEricGoldman) July 1, 2019 Comment Tags Back to the futureIf you’re a 1980s nostalgic, get ready for an awesome and totally tubular summer, as numerous critics say the show’s 1980s references are back. Edgar Alvarez of Engadget not only proclaims this the “best season yet,” but declares the new season is “basically a love letter to old-school tech, shopping malls &, of course, dope retro fits & wild haircuts.”But not everyone is ready for those faddish fashions to return. For reference, I was a huge supporter of jams shorts. Internet picture for reference. pic.twitter.com/Fb2eRCEP6V— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 Stranger Things season 3: Everything to know Originally published July 1, 12:36 a.m. PT. Update, 9:25 a.m. PT: Adds more reviews.  And at press time, the third season had a 92 percent Certified Fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and a Metascore of 71, indicating “generally favorable reviews,” on CNET sister site Metacritic.Stranger Things season 3 will be available on Netflix on July 4. 59 Photos Gross-out gangAnd in case you forgot this show has a horror theme, Eric Goldman of getFandom is there to remind you. “This felt like the goriest season yet,” he writes, “I had a couple ‘oh, I probably shouldn’t be eating right now’ moments. Yay, gore! 2:33 Our season 3 review Netflixlast_img read more

Gunmen attack Chinese consulate in Pakistan kill 4

first_imgPakistani security personnel stand next to burned out vehicles in front of the Chinese consulate after an attack in Karachi on 23 November 2018. At least two policemen were killed when unidentified gunmen stormed the Chinese consulate in the Pakistani port city of Karachi on November 23, officials said. Photo: AFPFour people were killed on Friday when gunmen armed with hand grenades and a suicide vest stormed the Chinese consulate in the Pakistani city of Karachi, officials said, with the attack claimed by a separatist group which branded Beijing “an oppressor”.Pakistani authorities said that security forces had secured the area after the attack, the latest assault on Chinese nationals in the country, where Beijing has poured billions of dollars into one of the largest projects in its massive Belt and Road programme.China “strongly condemned” the attack and asked Pakistan to take measures to ensure the safety of Chinese citizens and institutions in the country, as well as the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) mega-project.Three gunmen tried to enter the consulate in the southern port city, but were intercepted by guards at a checkpoint, Karachi police chief Ameer Sheikh told AFP.”They were holding Kalashnikovs. First, they hurled a small (grenade) and then started firing,” said Allah Bakhsh, a guard at a nearby house who witnessed the attack.Police officials said two of their personnel were killed, along with a father and son from Quetta, the capital of Balochistan, who were seeking Chinese visas and were caught in the crossfire.At least one of the attackers was wearing a suicide vest which did not detonate, another senior police official said.Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi told reporters in Islamabad that “all the terrorists have been eliminated”, and that all 21 staff at the consulate during the attack had been taken to a safe location.”Situation under control,” the military’s media wing added in a statement.- China is an ‘oppressor’ -The attack was claimed by a separatist militant group from Pakistan’s southwestern province of Balochistan, which is at the centre of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, the major Chinese project in the country.”We have been seeing the Chinese as an oppressor, along with Pakistani forces,” the spokesman for the Balochistan Liberation Army (BLA), Geand Baloch, told AFP by telephone from an undisclosed location, adding they were “destroying the future of Balochistan”.The BLA later emailed a statement to media in which it said the attack was “aimed at making it clear that China’s military expansionism on Baloch soil will not be tolerated”.It warned the Chinese to leave or “be prepared for continued attacks”.The group is just one of the militant outfits operating in Balochistan, Pakistan’s largest and poorest province, which is rife with ethnic, sectarian and separatist insurgencies.Residents of the resource-rich province, which borders Iran and Afghanistan, have long complained that it does not receive a fair share of the profits made from its mineral wealth.Prime minister Imran Khan said Friday’s attack would not undermine the Pakistan-China relationship, which he described in a statement as “mightier than Himalayas and deeper than Arabian Sea”.Also on Friday a bomb hidden in a carton of vegetables killed at least 20 people at a marketplace in Pakistan’s northwestern tribal region. Dozens more people were wounded, with fears the toll could rise.- Chinese investment -China, one of Pakistan’s closest allies, has poured billions into the South Asian country in recent years as part of CPEC, a massive infrastructure project that seeks to connect its western province Xinjiang with the Arabian Sea port of Gwadar in Balochistan.The project is one of the largest in Beijing’s “One Belt One Road” initiative, comprising a network of roads and sea routes involving 65 countries.Pakistan sees the project as a “gamechanger”, but it presents an enormous challenge in a country plagued by weak institutions, endemic corruption and a range of insurgencies in areas slated to host the corridor.The subject of economic dividends from CPEC is extremely sensitive in some of those areas — particularly in Balochistan.Since the beginning of the project militants have repeatedly attacked construction sites, blowing up numerous gas pipelines and trains, and targeted Chinese workers.In August this year three Chinese nationals were among six wounded in a suicide attack on a bus transporting Chinese engineers working in Balochistan, in an attack that was also claimed by the BLA.The Pakistani military has been targeting insurgencies in the province since 2004, and has been repeatedly accused by international rights groups of abuses there.Islamabad regularly accuses its eastern neighbour India of funding and arming Baloch separatists, and of targeting development projects in the province, particularly CPEC.India’s foreign ministry swiftly condemned Friday’s attack in a statement, saying: “There can be no justification whatsoever for any act of terrorism”.last_img read more

Researchers build nanoscale rotary apparatus using tightfitting 3D DNA components w Video

first_img PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen More information: P. Ketterer et al. Nanoscale rotary apparatus formed from tight-fitting 3D DNA components, Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501209AbstractWe report a nanoscale rotary mechanism that reproduces some of the dynamic properties of biological rotary motors in the absence of an energy source, such as random walks on a circle with dwells at docking sites. Our mechanism is built modularly from tight-fitting components that were self-assembled using multilayer DNA origami. The apparatus has greater structural complexity than previous mechanically interlocked objects and features a well-defined angular degree of freedom without restricting the range of rotation. We studied the dynamics of our mechanism using single-particle experiments analogous to those performed previously with actin-labeled adenosine triphosphate synthases. In our mechanism, rotor mobility, the number of docking sites, and the dwell times at these sites may be controlled through rational design. Our prototype thus realizes a working platform toward creating synthetic nanoscale rotary motors. Our methods will support creating other complex nanoscale mechanisms based on tightly fitting, sterically constrained, but mobile, DNA components. Play The assembly of the rotary apparatus. Credit: Philip Ketterer The tiny device built by the team represents the first example of a biologically inspired nanomachine capable of demonstrating dynamic motor-like behavior. It also represents a step forward in nanoarchitecture—the device was built molecule-by-molecule and perhaps is the first step towards the development of true nanorobots. They note also, that after watching their device in action, it is not difficult to envision such devices motoring around inside of people, in a way very similar to how bacteria get around. Design of a DNA-based rotary apparatus. Credit: (c) Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501209 Journal information: Science Advances Play A schematic animation of the passive rotary apparatus. The bearing around the rotor also gets slightly kicked around by water molecules but it is rigidly attached to the surface. (The water molecules by which the rotor gets kicked around due to their thermal energy are not explicitly shown in the movie.) Credit: Hendrik Dietz Group develops wearable, stretchable memory device for monitoring heart rate Scientists dream of building ever smaller motorized devices that could putter around inside the human body delivering medicines to ailing parts, toxins to tumors or simply serving as health monitors, but alas, such devices have not yet come to fruition—but they may be getting closer. In this new effort, the team in Germany has built a device based on synthetic DNA parts—it mimics, somewhat, the activities of flagella, the tiny arm-like appendages bacteria use as paddles to move around. It is only 40 nanometers tall but includes three main parts, a crank that spins, an axle bearing and a container to hold the other two parts together.It does not yet have a power source, thus it cannot be called a motorized device just yet, instead, it can move around due to thermal energy which creates colliding water molecules which in turn causes the crank to turn—the team cannot control the direction of the device yet either, but believe they may have a solution sometime in the near future. They plan to test ideas using laser heat, ion flow or even chemical reactions to cause the crank to turn, and hopefully allow for controlling direction. If they succeed such a tiny motorized device would be useful in more than just medical applications—it could also possibly be used to drive chemical syntheses or to pump molecules across barriers. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with Technische Universität München has built a nanoscale apparatus that could one day serve as the basis for an extremely tiny motorized device. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes how they built their device, how it works, and where they plan to take the new technology.center_img Citation: Researchers build nanoscale rotary apparatus using tight-fitting 3D DNA components (w/ Video) (2016, February 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-02-nanoscale-rotary-apparatus-tight-fitting-3d.html © 2016 Phys.org Explore further PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play A schematic representation of freely diffusing rotary apparatus with extended crank lever. Credit: Hendrik Dietz last_img read more