Stranger Things 3 reviews are out Best season by leaps and bounds

first_img TV and Movies i really loved new #StrangerThings but i’m most excited for everyone to see it and fall madly in love with maya hawke, who is just wonderful. she stole the season for me. pic.twitter.com/66UajQQ1yo— lindsey romain (@lindseyromain) July 1, 2019 So there’s not much more I can say, but I was so impressed with the way specific ships sailed & laughed out loud at least once per episode (mostly at DAD Hopper). Also a shopping scene 🥰 #strangerthings— Emily Longeretta (@emilylongeretta) June 30, 2019 1 Stranger Things is looking good. Netflix Things are about to get Strange. The third season of Netflix’s hit series Stranger Things arrives on July 4, and while it may be a stressful summer in Hawkins, Indiana, it’s looking like a great one for fans. The embargo for reviews lifted on Sunday, and critics shared their opinions.  Now playing: Watch this: I think I can finally tell you that #StrangerThings is the show’s best season yet. It’s not perfect (more on that later) but there are moments that are so good, so funny, so deeply heartfelt that it will leave you breathless. It’s also spectacularly gross and I loved it.— Crystal Bell (@crystalbell) June 30, 2019 We know from the recent final trailer that Billy (Dacre Montgomery) could be the target of some Upside Down evil this season. But apparently he’s also a great character this year. “Billy f****** owns,” Colburn writes. Look at this baller piece of clothing pic.twitter.com/bbwhkjQLTI— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 Now that I’ve seen some of #StrangerThings I am not only hit with a huge powerful wave of nostalgia (I was 9 in 1985) I am seriously wondering if we’ll see the absolute worst 80s fashion come back in style. Again.— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 i’ve watched #StrangerThings twice now and i think people who already hate it will find even more to hate but i truly believe the show transcends its inelegant ’80s pop culture flirtations with top-notch character work and archetypal subversion. billy fucking owns.— Randall Colburn (@randallcolburn) June 30, 2019 See all the Stranger Things season 3 photos And CNET sister site ComicBook.com says the 1980s references are just too much. “It’s entertaining to see beloved characters embracing the spirit of goofy ’80s films, but these homages feel so blatant that it feels more like a parody than a tribute,” the ComicBook review reads.Character critiquesThere will be plenty of familiar faces and a few new ones in Hawkins this season. Who stands out? She’s not alone in calling this season the best so far. Randall Colburn, internet culture editor for The AV Club, calls season 3 the show’s “best season by leaps and bounds.” Stranger Things 3 a brilliant return to form Share your voice To Lindsey Romain of Nerdist, the standout is 20-year-old Maya Hawke (yes, real-life daughter of Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman), who plays new character Robin, who apparently works with Steve at Scoops Ahoy, the ice-cream shop in Starcourt Mall. “She stole the season for me,” Romain writes. it’s the best season by leaps and bounds— Randall Colburn (@randallcolburn) June 30, 2019center_img It’s what fans wanted to hear. CNET’s own Jennifer Bisset calls season 3 “a brilliant return to form,” adding that it brings the focus back to the elements that made the first season such an unexpected hit. “This season’s sense of fun, along with its relationship drama and multiple odd pair-ups bring humor and touching moments that recall Game of Thrones at its best,” she writes.MTVNews culture director Crystal Bell tweeted, “I think I can finally tell you that #StrangerThings is the show’s best season yet.” Wrote about the new season of #StrangerThings, which is basically a love letter to old-school tech, shopping malls &, of course, dope retro fits & wild haircuts. The Duffer Brothers did it again: best season yet. (Fret not, didn’t spoil the sauce for you.) https://t.co/pBJ9lcm78S— Edgar Alvarez (@abcdedgar) June 30, 2019 And Police Chief Jim Hopper brings the laughs, according to Emily Longeretta of Us Weekly, who says she “laughed out loud at least once per episode (mostly at DAD Hopper).” Some of the humor in #StrangerThings this season is very broad – too broad, especially early on. On the other hand, this felt like the goriest season yet, which, of course, I was very happy about. I had a couple “oh, I probably shouldn’t be eating right now” moments. Yay, gore!— Eric Goldman (@TheEricGoldman) July 1, 2019 Comment Tags Back to the futureIf you’re a 1980s nostalgic, get ready for an awesome and totally tubular summer, as numerous critics say the show’s 1980s references are back. Edgar Alvarez of Engadget not only proclaims this the “best season yet,” but declares the new season is “basically a love letter to old-school tech, shopping malls &, of course, dope retro fits & wild haircuts.”But not everyone is ready for those faddish fashions to return. For reference, I was a huge supporter of jams shorts. Internet picture for reference. pic.twitter.com/Fb2eRCEP6V— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 Stranger Things season 3: Everything to know Originally published July 1, 12:36 a.m. PT. Update, 9:25 a.m. PT: Adds more reviews.  And at press time, the third season had a 92 percent Certified Fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and a Metascore of 71, indicating “generally favorable reviews,” on CNET sister site Metacritic.Stranger Things season 3 will be available on Netflix on July 4. 59 Photos Gross-out gangAnd in case you forgot this show has a horror theme, Eric Goldman of getFandom is there to remind you. “This felt like the goriest season yet,” he writes, “I had a couple ‘oh, I probably shouldn’t be eating right now’ moments. Yay, gore! 2:33 Our season 3 review Netflixlast_img read more

Dravidian language family 4500 years old

first_imgThe Dravidian language family, consisting of 80 varieties spoken by nearly 220 million people across southern and central India, originated about 4,500 years ago, a study has found. This estimate is based on new linguistic analyses by an international team, including researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Germany, and the Wildlife Institute of India in Dehradun.The researchers used data collected first-hand from native speakers representing all previously reported Dravidian subgroups. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThese findings, published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, match well with earlier linguistic and archaeological studies.South Asia, reaching from Afghanistan in the west and Bangladesh in the east, is home to at least six hundred languages belonging to six large language families, including Dravidian, Indo-European, and Sino-Tibetan.The Dravidian language family, consisting of about 80 language varieties (both languages and dialects) is today spoken by about 220 million people, mostly in southern and central India, and surrounding countries. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIts four largest languages, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil and Telugu have literary traditions spanning centuries, of which Tamil reaches back the furthest, researchers said.Along with Sanskrit, Tamil is one of the world’s classical languages, but unlike Sanskrit, there is continuity between its classical and modern forms documented in inscriptions, poems, and secular and religious texts and songs, they said.”The study of the Dravidian languages is crucial for understanding prehistory in Eurasia, as they played a significant role in influencing other language groups,” said Annemarie Verkerk of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. Neither the geographical origin of the Dravidian language nor its exact dispersal through time is known with certainty.The consensus of the research community is that the Dravidians are natives of the Indian subcontinent and were present prior to the arrival of the Indo-Aryans (Indo-European speakers) in India around 3,500 years ago.Researchers said that it is likely that the Dravidian languages were much more widespread to the west in the past than they are today.In order to examine questions about when and where the Dravidian languages developed, they made a detailed investigation of the historical relationships of 20 Dravidian varieties.Study author Vishnupriya Kolipakam of the Wildlife Institute of India collected contemporary first-hand data from native speakers of a diverse sample of Dravidian languages, representing all the previously reported subgroups of Dravidian.The researchers used advanced statistical methods to infer the age and subgrouping of the Dravidian language family at about 4,000-4,500 years old.This estimate, while in line with suggestions from previous linguistic studies, is a more robust result because it was found consistently in the majority of the different statistical models of evolution tested in this study.This age also matches well with inferences from archaeology, which have previously placed the diversification of Dravidian into North, Central, and South branches at exactly this age, coinciding with the beginnings of cultural developments evident in the archaeological record.last_img read more