Anthony Davis remains in trade limbo; Harrison Barnes to Sacramento

first_imgHarris, Boban Marjanovic and Mike Scott went to the 76ers, while Wilson Chandler, Mike Muscala and Landry Shamet went to the Clippers. Philadelphia — with an eye on moving way up from the No. 5 spot in the Eastern Conference — also gave up a protected 2020 first-round pick, a 2021 first-rounder that was once owned by Miami, and second-rounders in 2021 and 2023 through Detroit.“We are in the unique position to contend now and we think this trade positions us well for the postseason,” 76ers general manager Elton Brand said.Porter will be headed to Chicago, with the Wizards taking back Parker and Portis. Parker has been bracing for a trade, and moving Porter is a financial win if nothing else for Washington. So is the move that sends Morris to the Pelicans, one that should get the Wizards out of having to pay anything in luxury tax this season.Another deal with tax ramifications was worked out between Miami and Phoenix. The Heat sent Tyler Johnson and Wayne Ellington to the Suns for Ryan Anderson, helping alleviate the logjam of guards that Miami coach Erik Spoelstra has been dealing with all season — plus considerably lowering the Heat’s expected luxury tax bill. It’s likely that Ellington will be a buyout candidate, and therefore would be able to pick his own spot to finish the season.“This business is tough but this kid is tougher,” Heat guard Dwyane Wade wrote on Twitter, talking about Johnson. And later, he told Ellington he has “a brother for life.”Meanwhile, Davis remained in place and out of uniform.The Pelicans haven’t played him since he and agent Rich Paul went public last week with their trade request, and decided not to play the six-time All-Star in Chicago on Wednesday either. The reasons for that were obvious; in case a deal can be made, it’s not worth it for the Pelicans to risk an injury.“It’s going to eventually get resolved,” Gentry said.There will be resolution — maybe just partial resolution, but resolution nonetheless — when the deadline arrives Thursday afternoon. Davis is still under contract for next season, so the Pelicans are in a slippery spot where they don’t need to deal their best player now for fear of losing him in July for nothing but also know that he doesn’t want to remain in New Orleans.If the Pelicans don’t trade Davis by Thursday, they’ll almost certainly be back in the depths of trade talks in June and July — draft time and free agency. ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes “I mean, obviously, it’s on everyone’s mind,” Gentry said. “But we just try to put it on the back burner and focus on the task at hand and that’s playing the Chicago Bulls. Not anything we can do about it. … I think everything kind of clears up after (Thursday), at least for a while. And you can go back to I guess normal, or whatever our new normal is going to be.”In other trades Wednesday:— A person familiar with the terms said NBA-leading Milwaukee was sending center Thon Maker to the Detroit Pistons for forward Stanley Johnson. Both were lottery picks, Johnson in 2015 and Maker a year later. That trade was also pending the NBA reviewing the financial terms and approving, which is required for any deal to become final.— The Los Angeles Lakers — one of the teams known to want Davis — made another deal, getting Reggie Bullock from the Detroit Pistons for rookie guard Svi Mykhailiuk. Bullock is a shooter, and Lakers star LeBron James loves surrounding himself with those. Bullock is making nearly 39 percent of his 3-point tries this season. Mykhailiuk has averaged 3.3 points in 39 appearances.— Philadelphia swung a deal with Toronto, getting Malachi Richardson and some draft considerations for cash. Richardson appeared in 23 games during two seasons with the Raptors.— Two people with knowledge of the deal say Houston, Sacramento and Cleveland are finishing a trade that will most notably send Iman Shumpert from the Kings to the Rockets. Houston is sending Brandon Knight and Marquese Chriss to the Cavaliers. Alec Burks — now traded for the second time this season, after starting the year in Utah — will go from the Cavaliers to the Kings, when the league signs off on the necessary matters.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants MOST READ FIFA president Gianni Infantino is only candidate for election PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss LATEST STORIES “Part of the business,” New Orleans coach Alvin Gentry said.And business, on Wednesday, was busy — as expected.The Dallas-Sacramento deal will be significant for both sides.The Kings are trying to get into the Western Conference playoffs, and now can add Barnes to their promising young core. Barnes has a $25.1 million player option for next season. Meanwhile, Dallas — which got Kristaps Porzingis and Tim Hardaway Jr. from New York last week in a massive deal — will have tons of salary-cap space to spend in the coming months as it looks to add more pieces around Luka Doncic.“Things are going to look different on the court,” said Carlisle, who wished Barnes well and told him after Dallas’ game that he believes the Sacramento deal is a good situation for him.ADVERTISEMENT Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations New Orleans Pelicans forward Anthony Davis laughs as he walks on the court before an NBA basketball game against the Indiana Pacers in New Orleans, Monday, Feb. 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)MIAMI— Anthony Davis is still a member of the New Orleans Pelicans.By 3 p.m. Thursday, that may change.ADVERTISEMENT Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war Davis remained in place Wednesday, though the run-up to the NBA’s annual trade deadline picked up steam in plenty of other locales around the league — including Dallas, where the Mavericks took Harrison Barnes out of their win over Charlotte in the third quarter because he’s about to get moved to Sacramento, according to two people familiar with the negotiations there.“I got word of it during the game,” Dallas coach Rick Carlisle said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesTobias Harris going to Philadelphia from the Los Angeles Clippers as the centerpiece of a six-person, four-draft-pick swap was the first notable deal of Trade Deadline Eve. Later, Chicago agreed to acquire Otto Porter Jr. from Washington for Jabari Parker and Bobby Portis. The Mavs and Kings agreed to swap Barnes for Zach Randolph and Justin Jackson, and as the day was winding down the Wizards struck again — this time sending Markieff Morris to New Orleans for Wesley Johnson.The Mavs-Kings and Wizards-Pelicans deals were confirmed to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity by people directly involved in the negotiations, all speaking on condition of anonymity pending the mandatory NBA trade calls to make the deals official. View commentslast_img read more

3 Metrics Your Nonprofit Should Measure Using Google Analytics

first_imgAccessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, your nonprofit website is a valuable tool for interacting with your target audience and allowing visitors to learn about your nonprofit. Having the insights to efficiently manage your website are important to optimize the experience for your supporters and ensure the success of your nonprofit. Fortunately, Google Analytics provides organizations with a cost effective way to monitor the metrics that matter and help your team make informed decisions.Here are three metrics that your nonprofit should be measuring: This organization located in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, is generating a significant amount of its traffic from outside its city limits. Based on this insight, the organization could consider expanding their target audience into new geographic territories or hosting a fundraising event in a new location. Mobile Traffic Behavior As the number of mobile site searches increases, optimizing your nonprofit mobile site for smartphone and tablet users is becoming even more critical to interacting and engaging with your supporters. Mobile traffic behavior metrics let you monitor your site’s mobile traffic growth over time. When analyzing this metric, it’s important to remember that an increase in mobile traffic growth alone doesn’t indicate that your site is mobile friendly. As mobile visitors typically spend less time on a site that isn’t adequately optimized for their devices, time on site, and average visit duration metrics should also be evaluated. Page Bounce RatesA “bounce” occurs when a visitor navigates to a page and then immediately leaves. Depending on the intent of any given webpage, a high bounce rate could indicate a low level of audience interaction and engagement. For example, if your volunteer application page has a high bounce rate, then you need to reevaluate the page’s content as visitors are not spending enough time on the page to fill out any information.Although these three metrics only begin to cover the extent of the metrics offered by Google Analytics, they provide a foundation from which you can start to measure the performance of your  nonprofit website and your reputation. Knowing how to use the information displayed by these metrics will undoubtedly aid your nonprofit staff in optimizing your organization’s website content and improving overall audience engagement. For more information about the metrics that your organization should be utilizing download the free e-book, Top 10 Things Your Association Should Measure in Google Analytics.DJ Muller is president and founder of WebLink International, the creators of WebLink Connect™ the innovative, insightful and intuitive association management software with superior customer support. WebLink empowers hundreds of trade and professional associations and more than 500,000 small and medium businesses to help them acquire and retain more customers.center_img Audience LocationThe audience location metrics enable you to specifically determine the geographic areas that your site content is reaching. By monitoring this metric, your nonprofit will have the tools it needs to determine if it’s effectively reaching its intended target audience. Additionally, this metric can be used as a means to reveal emerging or previously unidentified audiences as well as the effectiveness of your promotional efforts.last_img read more

New Study: Are You Leaving Money in the Middle?

first_imgMind the gap.That’s the advice in a new report on mid-level donor programs. The folks at Sea Change Strategies caution that nonprofits are missing out on a ton of money simply because they’re overlooking a committed and productive audience: middle donors —the donors who give more than low-dollar direct marketing donations, but less than major gift targets. THE MISSING MIDDLE: Neglecting Middle Donors Is Costing You Millions, by Sea Change Strategies’ Alia McKee and Mark Rovner, does double duty as a wake-up call and roadmap for creating effective mid-level donor programs. The study is based on interviews and data from 27 organizations and experts, including heavy hitters like Roger Craver and nonprofits such as The Nature Conservancy and the Human Rights Campaign. The free whitepaper includes:8 habits of highly-effective mid-level donor programsA sample framework for a 30-day action planIn-depth profiles of two highly effective mid-level programsFresh from the AFP conference in San Antonio, Alia McKee shares some more insight about The Missing Middle:How do you distinguish mid-level giving from a major donor program? Is it simply the dollar amount or are there other things going on here?Alia: It’s really about the dollar amount. Of course the definition of middle donor varies from organization to organization, but it tends to hover anywhere between $250-$9,000 cumulative in a year.In the report, you touch on possible challenges on getting executive buy-in. Can you give us some ideas on how to make the case for investing in a mid-level donor program?Alia:1. Among the groups participating in the Wired Wealthy Study, donors at the $1,000 to $10,000 levels (annual giving via all channels) represented roughly one percent of the donor population, but were giving more than a third of the dollars. That’s a HUGE amount of revenue.2. Middle donors are actually an organization’s most committed donors. They will be retained and upgraded far more than smaller donors and far more than major donors. They represent a very significant block of money, commitment and loyalty.3. A functional and philosophical gap exists between direct marketing programs and major gifts programs. Hence, middle donors often receive lackluster treatment that is driven by attribution wars and resentment across the organizational divide. But their capacity to give is huge—so minor tweaks to their treatment can yield big results in revenue. What was the biggest surprise for you in this research?Alia: Despite the fact that every fundraiser and expert we talked to universally agreed that mid-level donors are exceptionally valuable, they also agreed that most organizations haven’t made the kinds of investments necessary to make the most of this immense opportunity.Can small shops pursue a mid-level donor program?Alia: Absolutely. Small changes in stewardship of middle donors can yield results regardless of an organization’s size. Of course, capacity is an issue. But many nonprofits we spoke to approached this creatively including:Staff pizza parties to stuff personalized mailers to middle donorsVolunteer phone calls to middle donors thanking them for their supportMore substantive content to middle donors culled from other organizational communicationsCan your online efforts help your mid-level strategy?Alia: Digital outreach is not the silver bullet when it comes to middle donors. You must communicate with those donors across channels (e.g. be channel agnostic) and give them substantive communications in person, via phone, by notecard or by email. Ideally, you’d reach them through their self-selected preferred channels. Just for fun: Monie in the Middle or Malcolm in the Middle?Alia: Malcolm in the Middle, but only because of Bryan Cranston!Get in touch with your Missing Middle. Join our free webinar with Sea Change Strategies’ Alia McKee and Mark Rovner on Tuesday, May 6 at 1pm EDT. Register now for your chance to hear from these two fundraising gurus and get your mid-level donor questions answered. (Can’t attend the live session? Register anyway to get a copy of the recording sent directly to you via email.)last_img read more

How to Optimize Your #GivingTuesday Experience

first_imgOf course, all fundraisers think their fundraising campaigns are special, but some campaigns are more special than others.A campaign for a giving day like #GivingTuesday is no exception.This is because your campaign and all of the outreach associated with it should have a specific focus, incentive, or goal that makes it different from your annual fund drive or an evergreen donation appeal. Just as your nonprofit’s message and branding should be unique to your organization, the same holds true for these types of special campaigns. When your fundraising campaign has a special focus, your donation page should follow suit.For best results, you should customize your nonprofit’s donation page for your #GivingTuesday campaign. You can opt to update your existing donation page or add an extra page dedicated to your special campaign. Another great reason for having multiple donation pages on hand? Better donor targeting and options for testing. Smarter fundraising for the win! (Need a smarter donation page that gives you the flexibility to customize for special campaigns? We can help.)When a donor lands on a page that has options and prompts that match your campaign criteria, they won’t wonder if they landed in the wrong spot.Optimize Your Donation Page for #GivingTuesdayAs you create or update your donation page for #GivingTuesday, keep in mind your goal is to achieve maximum message match. That is, your images, language, and giving options should be consistent with your appeals and campaign type. If your #GivingTuesday appeal focuses on supporting one particular program in your organization, don’t make donors hunt to find how to designate their gift.Copy:If your campaign is all about the #GivingTuesday Mega Match, when you send supporters to your donation page to join the #GivingTuesday Mega Match, your page better has a big headline that says something like “Double Your Gift with the #GivingTuesday Mega Match today to save.” Imagine the disappointment of a donor ready to give to the #GivingTuesday Mega Match and there’s no mention of the #GivingTuesday Mega Match to be found. In addition to your headline, it’s a good idea to include a few short (and I mean short) lines to describe and reiterate the goal of your #GivingTuesday campaign and what will happen as a result of the gift.Images:Does your #GivingTuesday campaign have a special logo or signature image? Then it needs to be on your donation page to let donors know that they’ve arrived at the correct destination. Remember: Your donation page should visually match not only your nonprofit’s brand but the campaign materials that likely brought them to the page in the first place.Donation Options:I think you can guess what I’m going to say here. If your #GivingTuesday appeal is all about recurring gifts or specific giving levels, don’t offer a bunch of unrelated options. The idea is that you shouldn’t have to do much explaining to allow your donor to successfully complete their donation. Create a clear and easy path and let them do their thing. Tip: To ensure maximum message match, use our Donation Page Checklist to keep you on track.Remember:  your goal here is to remove any friction that might slow donors down or make it difficult for them to make a donation on #GivingTuesday. When a donor has to stop and reconcile discrepancies or sift through unrelated options to give, they’re more likely to be eyeing the door instead of your donation page.To-do: Write down three things that make your #GivingTuesday campaign unique. Now, make sure these three items are prominently featured on your donation page.last_img read more

As UN General Assembly Reviews MDGs, How Can the Next Global Development Framework Accelerate Progress on Maternal Health?

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 23, 2013February 2, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)When the United Nations General Assembly meets this week, world leaders will review progress toward the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and debate the next global development agenda. There is little question that the next framework will have a critical bearing on whether, and by how much, maternal mortality will be reduced in the coming years. The priority that maternal health and related issues, such as HIV and AIDS and family planning, receive in the global framework will influence health policy and programming around the world.As a group of maternal health experts representing WHO and USAID pointed out in a commentary published in August in The Lancet Global Health: “Between 1990 and 2010, maternal mortality decreased globally by nearly 50%, from 543 000 maternal deaths per year to 287 000, with the greatest reductions in  the second half of this period. A major catalyst for this progress was the target set by Millennium Development Goal 5: reduction of the maternal mortality ratio by 75% between 1990 and 2015. Later, a second target on reproductive health was added, which has undoubtedly contributed to accelerated progress.”Going in to the debate, there is good reason to believe that maternal health will remain on the agenda. In May, the High Level Panel of Eminent Persons (HLP), commissioned by UN Secretary Ban Ki-Moon recommended that the UN adopt a set of 12 interrelated goals, each supported by a set of ambitious targets for achieving a vision of sustainable development, that ensures that  the world of 2030 is “more equal, more prosperous, more peaceful, and more just.” Among the goals and targets, the HLP recommended that maternal mortality ratio be reduced to “no more than X deaths per 100,000 births” by 2030 as part of goal 4, which seeks to “Ensure Healthy Lives.” Unlike the MDG target, which proposed a 75 percent reduction in the maternal mortality ratio for all countries, regardless of what their MMR was at the baseline, this proposed measure would define progress against an absolute figure. Depending on how “X” is defined, then, many countries would start off having “achieved” the target, while others might be challenged to reduce their MMR by an even greater degree than the 75 percent set by the MDGs.In the months since the HLP offered its recommendations, policy makers, researchers and others have begun to consider  the proposed goal, as well as the implications that the shift from a relative to an absolute measure would have for priorities in global and national efforts to improve maternal health.  For instance, the recent Lancet commentary proposed one response, suggesting that the UN adopt the overall target for countries to achieve an MMR of no more than 50 deaths/100,000 births by 2035, along with more specific targets and national strategies for countries that currently have maternal mortality ratios of over 400 deaths/100,000 births, as well as for addressing inequities within countries where overall maternal mortality is relatively close to the target (under 100/100,000) by focusing on improving maternal health among subpopulations with higher than average maternal mortality rates. At the same time, the authors called for new strategies and approaches to measure and reduce maternal mortality.The General Assembly debate provides an important opportunity to reflect on the progress, challenges and lessons learned under the MDGs, and to consider the best ways of  accelerating global and national progress toward reducing maternal mortality after 2015.We want to hear from you. What role do you think MDG5 has played in accelerating progress toward reducing maternal mortality? Has the time come to shift to an absolute target, or is a relative measure more useful? What challenges and opportunities do you see in the proposed overall framework which groups maternal health with other health issues? Is reducing the maternal mortality ratio the best way to measure progress toward ending preventable maternal deaths, or would a different measure be more useful?Share this:last_img read more

New Commitments Announced at ICFP 2013 Will Bolster Contraceptive Access and Choice in Countries With High Unmet Need

first_imgPosted on November 14, 2013November 17, 2016By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This week, as donors, health program leaders, researchers, policy makers and advocates from around the world are meeting at the International Conference on Family Planning in Addis Ababa to discuss evidence, programming and policy priorities for achieving the goal of “full access, full choice” for family planning.  Some of the biggest news from the conference has been in the area of commitments to the FP2020 agenda, which was launched at last year’s London Summit on Family Planning. FP2020 released the first progress report on the initiative, highlighting developments such as commitments, accountability, innovation, collaboration and the agenda for evaluating progress that have emerged since the initiative.  What is more, the report release coincided with new commitments from five countries with some of the world’s highest levels of unmet need for family planning . From FP2020: “Over a year ago in London, the global community declared women’s health and well-being an urgent priority. Today, we are seeing words translate into action,” said Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund, and Co-Chair of the FP2020 Reference Group. “What’s most encouraging is that the countries taking the greatest steps toward improving access to modern contraceptives, including through increased domestic resources for family planning, are the countries where family planning choices have been the most limited.” National Plans, Donor Resources, Civil Society Partnerships Underpin Progress The new national family planning pledges announced at ICFP 2013 focus on policy, financial and service delivery commitments that are critical to increasing access for more women and girls. These include: • In the Democratic Republic of Congo, the government will use domestic resources for the first time to purchase contraceptives. •In Guinea, funds will be used to recruit thousands of health workers who can deliver family planning in rural areas, as has proven successful in other countries like Ethiopia. •Myanmar will implement a monitoring system to strengthen quality of care and ensure women have a full range of contraceptive options. •Beginning in 2014, the government of Mauritania will commit to allocating health commodity security funds for family planning and, along with its partners, commit to mobilizing additional resources for the implementation of its national family planning action plan. •By 2015, Benin will ensure that modern methods of contraceptives are available without cost and that reproductive health training is provided for adolescents and youth. Countries currently make up one-third of the more than 70 commitment-makers to FP2020. Progress is being led by national governments, in collaboration with civil society organizations, service providers, advocates, industry leaders and experts. One-quarter of FP2020 commitment-making countries have launched detailed, costed national family planning plans. One-third of commitment-making countries have increased their national budget allocations for family planning services or supplies.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Learning to Pay the Price: The Need for Remuneration of Frontline Health Workers

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:,CHW checking children for malnutrition in Kenya (credit: MDG Center, Kenya)This health worker shortage is a critical issue in over 80 countries. The WHO and Global Health Workforce Alliance estimate that there is a global shortage of at least 7.2 million doctors, nurses and midwives. In an attempt to address these serious healthcare gaps, many organizations, communities, and countries train and deploy community health workers (CHWs). CHWs are community members, often female, who volunteer to provide essential health services to their communities. From prenatal and postnatal care, to malaria diagnosis and nutrition assistance, CHWs provide lifesaving treatment often at little or no cost to the community. They are vital in the fight to improve maternal and child health.On average, CHWs are responsible for visiting about 100 households and are usually expected to provide follow-up treatment as well as health promotion services to the greater community. However, far too often, CHWs do all of this—enough work for a full-time job—for little or no pay. That’s right, this cadre of health workers is largely unpaid. This lack of remuneration only exacerbates the already stressful job of CHWs, which can have a devastating impact on maternal and child health.So, what’s the rationale for not paying CHWs? The most widely cited reasons include:Compensating CHWs will detract from their sense of communityCompensating CHWs will reduce their value or legitimacy within the communityCompensating CHWs is difficult due to lack of domestic resourcesCHW performing routine check-up on an infant in Senegal (credit: 1mCHW Campaign)Although this list is not extensive, it is telling. There appears to be a general absence of “willingness to pay” for CHWs within the international community. However, research has shown that CHWs who are compensated, either financially or non-financially, perform better than those who volunteer. This is indicative of a growing trend in both programmatic and academic literature that demonstrates not only the need for, but also the value of remunerating CHWs. Some of the most recent evidence can be found in USAID’s 2011 CHW Assessment and Improvement Matrix Toolkit, which suggests financial and non-financial incentives as one of 15 recommendations for CHW improvement.Across the world CHWs are making healthcare accessible. They are an integral part of a country’s health system because they are members of the same communities as the people they serve. As such, they too face the same barriers to health and livelihood as their community. By not compensating CHWs, the international community is not only failing to recognize them professionally, but is also perpetuating poverty and reducing the capabilities of an effective cadre of health workers. All of which adds up to this: we are stalling progress in maternal and child health.CHWs improve health and communities by bringing care to those who need it. It’s time to reciprocate and show CHWs the care and dignity they deserve through health workforce formalization and proper remuneration. Posted on August 20, 2014November 2, 2016By: Cindil Redick, Communications & Advocacy Advisor, One Million Community Health Workers (1mCHW) CampaignClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In many parts of rural sub-Saharan Africa, clinics and hospitals are few and far between. A recent report by Save the Children estimates that every day approximately 22,000 children die before they reach their fifth birthday. This fact is augmented by the World Health Organization’s (WHO) estimation that at least 1 billion people have little to no access to health workers. The worst part is that this results in death. Quality care provided by a health worker can prevent most of the causes of maternal and child mortality. CHW checking children for malnutrition in Kenya (credit: MDG Center, Kenya)This health worker shortage is a critical issue in over 80 countries. The WHO and Global Health Workforce Alliance estimate that there is a global shortage of at least 7.2 million doctors, nurses and midwives. In an attempt to address these serious healthcare gaps, many organizations, communities, and countries train and deploy community health workers (CHWs). CHWs are community members, often female, who volunteer to provide essential health services to their communities. From prenatal and postnatal care, to malaria diagnosis and nutrition assistance, CHWs provide lifesaving treatment often at little or no cost to the community. They are vital in the fight to improve maternal and child health.On average, CHWs are responsible for visiting about 100 households and are usually expected to provide follow-up treatment as well as health promotion services to the greater community. However, far too often, CHWs do all of this—enough work for a full-time job—for little or no pay. That’s right, this cadre of health workers is largely unpaid. This lack of remuneration only exacerbates the already stressful job of CHWs, which can have a devastating impact on maternal and child health.So, what’s the rationale for not paying CHWs? The most widely cited reasons include:Compensating CHWs will detract from their sense of communityCompensating CHWs will reduce their value or legitimacy within the communityCompensating CHWs is difficult due to lack of domestic resourcesCHW performing routine check-up on an infant in Senegal (credit: 1mCHW Campaign)Although this list is not extensive, it is telling. There appears to be a general absence of “willingness to pay” for CHWs within the international community. However, research has shown that CHWs who are compensated, either financially or non-financially, perform better than those who volunteer. This is indicative of a growing trend in both programmatic and academic literature that demonstrates not only the need for, but also the value of remunerating CHWs. Some of the most recent evidence can be found in USAID’s 2011 CHW Assessment and Improvement Matrix Toolkit, which suggests financial and non-financial incentives as one of 15 recommendations for CHW improvement.Across the world CHWs are making healthcare accessible. They are an integral part of a country’s health system because they are members of the same communities as the people they serve. As such, they too face the same barriers to health and livelihood as their community. By not compensating CHWs, the international community is not only failing to recognize them professionally, but is also perpetuating poverty and reducing the capabilities of an effective cadre of health workers. All of which adds up to this: we are stalling progress in maternal and child health.CHWs improve health and communities by bringing care to those who need it. It’s time to reciprocate and show CHWs the care and dignity they deserve through health workforce formalization and proper remuneration.Share this:last_img read more

The Importance of the Thank You: Creating an Attitude of Gratitude

first_imgFrom early childhood, we are taught the magic words: thank you.  I don’t have to tell you that these two simple words can make or break the relationship between an organization and its donors.Most nonprofits know how important it is to send acknowledgment letters after receiving gifts. We dutifully thank our donors for the recorded gift date and amount and tell the donor about the many great works we perform because of the gifts we receive. Some of us even add the executive director’s signature as a personal touch. We thank our donors and move on to the next task.But, to truly engage and retain donors, we need to do so much more!We need to foster an attitude of gratitude and create a culture of “thanks-4-giving!” Developing a donor-centric gift acknowledgment policy is key to ensuring our donors feel appreciated and our board members are excited about fundraising – which is a win-win for any organization!To create an ATTITUDE OF GRATITUDE, consider the good ole’ fashion 5Ws and an H:Who is involved in each step of the thank you process?Invite board members into the thank you process. Thank them first and recognize their gifts and role as huge supporters of your organization.Print a weekly gift report that’s given to every staff and board member involved in thanking donors. Brainstorm ways to make sure EVERY donor knows their gift matters.Prepare thank you note cards at board meetings with notes about the donor. Also, ask board members to write, or at least sign, several notes OR better yet, make phone calls, thanking the donors before the meeting officially begins.What is your gift acknowledgment policy?Is it part of a larger, more encompassing thank you policy?What happens from the moment the gift arrives?Do you have this policy in writing so that it is an organizational process, not person dependent?Does the gift amount determine the speed of acknowledgment, who the ‘thanker’ is, or the method of thanking?When is each donor thanked?How often are acknowledgment letters sent? Is it a daily, weekly, or monthly task?Are larger donors thanked more quickly than smaller donors? Is a $10,000 gift acknowledged the same way as a $10 gift?Is a donor thanked at any time besides in the gift acknowledgment letter or the next ask?Where are donors thanked?EVERYWHERE! Every time we see them. Every chance we get.Expose staff members to donors’ names. Post a donor sign/wall in the office. Acknowledge them in a weekly employee briefing or at a staff meeting.Mention donors on the website, in newsletters, and on social media. Get the word out: you have FANTASTIC donors!Why do we always need to thank donors? Isn’t once enough?Because without them, nothing happens!Your organization is the facilitator of the relationship between the donor and the recipient. Try not to get in the way. Focus on how the donor makes a difference. How are donors thanked?Develop quirky, unexpected, and fun ways to surprise donors:Decide 3-4 extra “thanks-4-giving” times per year. From Valentine’s Day to your organization’s anniversary to the donor’s birthday, there’s lots of opportunities to show your gratitude.Produce a quick-and-easy thanks video that highlights program participants and send it out via email.Hold an annual “thanks-4-giving” breakfast, picnic, or other event.Post a daily/weekly/monthly (depending on the volume of donors) social media “shout-out” that highlights specific donors.John F. Kennedy once said, “As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.” As nonprofits, we must follow this advice and live our gratitude for the donors who make our work possible. From social media posts to regular phone calls and appreciation events, taking a “thanks-4-giving” approach will help our organizations not just survive, but thrive, in the future.last_img read more

NFG Staff Profile: Abdul Yusuff

first_imgIn the two and a half years that Abdul Yusuff has been a fundraising sales consultant with Network for Good, he has consistently built relationships with prospective clients about the connection between their fundraising and their mission, the critical areas that they need help with, and whether Network for Good would be the right partner to help them get where they want to be.“If you want to make any type of change in the world, people have to come together. No one can do anything alone. When I hear of an organization trying to pool all their resources to attack a major problem or a concern or an area of improvement—that whole concept is inspiring.”Q&A with Abdul Yusuff, Fundraising Sales ConsultantWhat is your experience with nonprofits outside of Network for Good?I have participated in numerous different nonprofits, including religious organizations (my dad’s a chairman of the board of an international religious organization), youth development, and sports and recreation. I spend most of my time focused on youth development and just joined the board of a youth development organization in Ohio. Also, I’m a donor and event speaker for Cause I Care, an organization dedicated to empowering black women in Prince George’s County, Maryland, that my best friend started last year. I just spoke at their Brown Girls and Big Hats Tea Party this past April. It’s exciting to see the people that she’s mentoring and how they’re being impacted by the mission.They had an essay contest where the winner won a laptop. I spoke about all the entries and shared with their parents, family, friends, and mentors what they were writing about and what was important to these individuals. As a young kid, I was a recipient of a computer, so it was cool to be able to pay that forward now as a young adult.What attracts you to nonprofits?The impact that you’re able to make when you bring people together. Spiritually and religiously, it’s always been instilled in me that what I do with my life and my resources is what matters the most. So being able to provide impact to other people and the environment around me, those are the most valuable things that I can do while I’m on this earth. I’ve always had a passion and dedication for finding ways to continue that work. I’ve done a little work internationally and I see the power of getting people together in underdeveloped countries where a lot of things are less established. You can see what one organization can bring to a small country.What do you enjoy most about the work you do at Network for Good? I enjoy making a sale because that’s my five-minute reward for countless hours of work. And the impact of that sale is huge. I can touch many people with that sale—board members that I don’t know, my contact at the nonprofit who is struggling to do their job, my colleagues here in the office. I get to collaborate on a lot of moving pieces all for one single goal.What is your favorite thing to do when you’re not at work?My favorite thing to do is to be active. I’m really into sports and all the benefits that it brings—mentally, physically, spiritually, emotionally. If you want to test your mental fortitude, find a way to compete on a physical level. I play flag football and coach wrestling at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, Maryland. Those two things help me escape the day-to-day.Who is your favorite athlete of all time?I have to give it to Michael Jordan because of his behind-the-scenes story. This guy was never satisfied. You can trace his accomplishments back to his mindset and the respect that he put into everything that he did. The thing that was most inspiring was his baseball career. He went from being a megastar to a nobody. His commitment level and the attention to detail that he put into a sport that wasn’t going to give him the same kind of rewards that he’d gotten in his basketball career. He showed everyone how to be part of a team and not overshadow what that team was doing. That highlights what sports is all about.Lightning RoundDream vacation? Saudi ArabiaMost recent book read? The Challenger Sale by Matthew Dixon and Brent AdamsonLast movie seen in movie theater? Us Your theme song? Mark Morrison’s “Return of the Mack”Favorite color? PurpleRead more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

New Research Calls for a Different Approach for Misoprostol for Postpartum Hemorrhage

first_img[1] Research partners include Gynuity Health Projects; University of California, San Francisco; University of Illinois, Chicago; JN Medical College Belgaum, Karnataka; and BLDE University’s Shri B. M. Patil Medical College Bijapur, Karnataka This post has been lightly edited from its original appearance on the FCI Blog.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Read the study here:Raghavan, et al. “Misoprostol for primary versus secondary prevention of postpartum haemorrhage: a cluster-randomised non-inferiority community trial,” BJOG. 2015.center_img The World Health Organization (WHO) and the global health community recommend that all pregnant women receive a uterotonic drug at the time of childbirth to prevent PPH regardless of their risk level, a model known as ‘universal prophylaxis.’ In many settings, however, achieving this model may not be feasible or cost-effective – especially in remote areas located far away from a health facility. Even with universal prophylaxis, some women (approximately 6-15%) will still develop PPH and require emergency care.Partners from U.S. and Indian research institutions compared the universal prophylaxis model to one focusing on ‘early treatment,’ whereby only women who bleed more than 350 mL during labor are given a pre-emptive treatment dose of misoprostol. [1] Conducted in a rural district in southern India from 2011-2014, the study enrolled over 3,000 women who delivered with an Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANM) at home or in a health sub-centre, the most basic level of health facility.In designing the study, the researchers emphasized the “imperative to create options to manage postpartum hemorrhage wherever women deliver, including the lowest levels of the health system.” The ANMs were randomly divided into two groups; those in the universal prophylaxis group gave 600 micrograms (3 tablets) of oral misoprostol to all women within five minutes of birth, and the early treatment group administered 800 mcg (4 tablets) of sublingual misoprostol to women who lost more than 350 mL of blood.Results from the research shows that early treatment of PPH is a feasible alternative strategy to universal prophylaxis; there was no difference in the rates of bleeding and in the rates of transfer to a higher-level facility between the two approaches. Fewer women in the early treatment group than the universal prophylaxis group received medication (4.7% versus 99.7%), so early treatment has the potential to be more cost-effective. This model can also equip community level providers with a strategy to manage bleeding before it becomes life-threatening.In discussing these findings, the researchers noted, “This new early treatment approach is an important step towards a more strategic placement of misoprostol for managing postpartum hemorrhage along the continuum of care.” Indeed, these findings also raise questions about the need for a universal prophylaxis approach, especially in remote and rural settings where women give birth at home. Posted on January 7, 2016June 12, 2017By: Shafia Rashid, Senior Technical Advisor, Family Care International (FCI) Program of Management Sciences for HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH)—excessive, uncontrolled bleeding during or after childbirth—is the leading cause of maternal death around the world.  Despite this, the condition is almost entirely preventable and treatable. In some parts of the world, women give birth at home or in health facilities lacking the essential supplies and equipment to manage PPH and other life-threatening complications.Wherever a woman decides to give birth, she needs access to life-saving, uterus-contracting drugs, called uterotonics, for the prevention and treatment of PPH. The recommended uterotonic, injectable oxytocin, requires cold storage and technical skill to administer, making it difficult or impossible to use in many rural and low-resource areas. Misoprostol is a safe and effective uterotonic and a good alternative in community settings since it doesn’t require refrigeration or administration by a professional.last_img read more

Jamaican Writers Perform at Jamaica 55 Literary Evening

first_img Three award-winning United Kingdom-based Jamaican writers, Alex Wheatle, Kerry Young and Kei Miller, were featured at the Jamaica 55 Literary Evening, which was hosted by the Jamaican High Commission in London, recently. Participants included Councillors Adam Jogee, Joan Henry and Aleen Alarice, representatives of community organisations; Jamaicans and friends of Jamaica as well as members of staff and families of the High Commission. The event was supported by Grace Foods, National Bakery and Island Delight Patties. Three award-winning United Kingdom-based Jamaican writers, Alex Wheatle, Kerry Young and Kei Miller, were featured at the Jamaica 55 Literary Evening, which was hosted by the Jamaican High Commission in London, recently.The Literary Evening is one of the activities being held this year as part of the Jamaica 55-UK celebrations.High Commissioner, His Excellency Seth George Ramocan, noted the importance of the event, which was aimed at showcasing the depth and diversity of Jamaica’s rich culture.The High Commissioner said Jamaica has produced many outstanding and world-renowned writers and creative thinkers, yet this aspect of Jamaica’s cultural heritage is sometimes overlooked.Consequently, it is important to use every opportunity to highlight the many great Jamaican talents in this field, he added.Mr. Wheatle, who won the 2016 Guardian Children’s Fiction Prize, read from his novel, ‘Island Song’.Ms. Young, an Honorary Assistant Professor in the School of English at the University of Nottingham and Honorary Creative Writing Fellow at the University of Leicester, read from the novels in her trilogy, ‘Pao’, ‘Gloria’ and ‘Show Me a Mountain’.Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Exeter, Dr. Miller read from his short-story collection, ‘The Fear of Stones’, and novel, ‘Augustown’, which won the 2017 OCM Bocas Prize for Caribbean Literature.The Evening also featured performances by the Koromanti mento group, led by Harold Patten; an open mike segment, as well as a display of Jamaican and Caribbean books by Hansib Publishers.Participants included Councillors Adam Jogee, Joan Henry and Aleen Alarice, representatives of community organisations; Jamaicans and friends of Jamaica as well as members of staff and families of the High Commission. The event was supported by Grace Foods, National Bakery and Island Delight Patties.center_img Story Highlightslast_img read more

Jamaica Seeing Construction Boom

first_img Jamaica is seeing a surge in construction, with a number of public- and private-sector-led residential and non-residential projects taking place, providing employment for thousands of persons.Right across the country, one can readily spot several housing and commercial high-rise buildings being erected, particularly in the Corporate Area.Among these are the new corporate offices of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, and expansion of GraceKennedy’s head office in downtown Kingston; business process outsourcing (BPO) operations along Half-Way-Tree Road; hotel and housing developments and road projects.This is in keeping with the Government’s thrust to boost economic growth and job creation through infrastructural development.First Vice-President, Integrated Master Builders’ Association (IMAJ), Lenworth Kelly, tells JIS News that “there is a fair amount of activity in the market”.He notes that the projects are not limited to Kingston and St. Andrew, pointing to infrastructural works being undertaken by the National Water Commission (NWC) and the National Works Agency (NWA) right across the country.He also points to quasi-governmental organisations such as the National Housing Trust (NHT) and the Housing Agency of Jamaica (HAJ) that have ongoing housing projects, largely in parishes outside of Kingston.In addition, road improvement/expansion projects are taking place on Barbican Road and Mandela Highway, and similar works have begun on Hagley Park Road and Constant Spring/Eastwood Park Road.The Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ), in its report for the April to June 2017 quarter, said increased activity in residential and non-residential projects pushed growth in the sector to 1.5 per cent.Total housing starts increased from 385 units in the corresponding quarter of 2016 to 1,687 units. This reflected new housing developments by the NHT with 684 starts, up 77.7 per cent, as well as by a private developer, through the NHT interim financing scheme, for some 1,003 starts at the Winchester Estate in Hanover.For the non-residential developments, these included new projects as well as expansion and renovation works at several resort properties, including the Wyndham Hotel – 455 rooms; Oyster Bay – 355 rooms; and Spanish Court II – 120 rooms, while construction of several commercial properties remained ongoing.The NWA also increased expenditure by 201.9 per cent to $3 billion for road clearing and rehabilitation following the heavy rainfall during the quarter, while the Port Authority of Jamaica’s spending on projects was increased by 201.1 per cent, to US $365.2 million.The growth continued in the October to December 2017 quarter, supported by a 77.9 per cent increase in the total value of mortgages provided by the NHT as well as work in progress on previously started developments.With respect to the non-residential category, activities included increased construction and renovation of hotels and commercial buildings.The Investors Choice online magazine is projecting that real value-added in construction will continue in 2018, with the sector to get a boost from the start of the Harbour View to Portland roadworks and widening of the Hagley Park and Constant Spring roads.Mr. Kelly tells JIS News that the construction industry stakeholders welcome these new/ongoing projects “where we have employment of mass labour”.He notes that construction is the largest mass employer, particularly of unskilled labour.Comprising over 500 firms, the construction industry employs more than 100,000 persons.Mr. Kelly points out that the construction sector is especially crucial in terms of its contribution to the development of local communities and overall stimulation of economic growth.He notes, for example, that local businesses situated in the areas in which construction projects are taking place would normally benefit from the operations.“So, if you are out in St. Thomas, obviously, when you are employing people there, those people have a spend in that local economy so you get that trickle-down. It extends in other sectors – restaurants, shops, supermarkets, meat shops, hardware, and so on,” he points out.He notes, as well, that contractors purchase from local hardware merchants, manufacturers and other suppliers, which also provides a stimulus to their businesses.Emphasising the importance of the industry to national development, Chairman of the Construction Industry Council, Gary Walters, says the construction is a vital part of the economy, promoting investment through its own activities as well as generating further investment in the broader economy.The sector is estimated to contribute approximately 7. 2 per cent of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP).Mr. Walters says it also provides the physical infrastructure that underpins the economy and the built environment that more directly influences the quality of life of Jamaican citizens.Former Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, Hon. Dr. Horace Chang, says the Administration is committed to facilitating and engendering productivity in the construction sector.Addressing the eighth annual Mona School of Business and Management (MSBM) Roundtable and CEO Breakfast Forum at The University of the West Indies, Mona, last year, Dr. Chang said that steps have been taken to increase transparency and reduce uncertainty around the awarding of government contracts.In addition, the Government has been working to streamline the tender process, reduce bureaucracy, ensure that realistic project planning and feasibility studies are done, increase consultation with industry players to improve project outcomes, and ensure that there is greater political consensus around planned projects to improve market confidence and guarantee continuity.Further, there is also a draft Construction Policy, which seeks to address a range of issues, including encouragement of wider participation of industry players and innovation in and modernisation of the industry, promoting regional cooperation, creation of an enabling regulatory environment, improving construction management and greater competitiveness.The Government is working to achieve further growth in the sector and remains committed to pursuing policies that encourage and facilitate this goal. Right across the country, one can readily spot several housing and commercial high-rise buildings being erected, particularly in the Corporate Area. Story Highlights Jamaica is seeing a surge in construction, with a number of public- and private-sector-led residential and non-residential projects taking place, providing employment for thousands of persons. Among these are the new corporate offices of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, and expansion of GraceKennedy’s head office in downtown Kingston; business process outsourcing (BPO) operations along Half-Way-Tree Road; hotel and housing developments and road projects.last_img read more

Distillery has new bourbon flavoured by beaver secretion

first_imgTAMWORTH, N.H. – Beaver-flavoured whiskey, anyone?A New Hampshire distillery has a new bourbon, Eau De Musc, flavoured partly by the secretion from a beaver’s castor sacs.Tamworth Distilling says the secretion, called castoreum, has a history of being used as a flavouring and is on a small list of FDA ingredients called “generally recognized as safe.”The distillery says on its website castoreum “exhibits bright and fruit qualities (raspberry) and rich leathery notes along with creamy vanilla aroma,” common among barrel-aged spirits.Other ingredients are raspberry, Canadian snakeroot, fir needles, birch bark (tar oil and regular oil) and maple syrup.last_img

Enbridge selling Midcoast business to AL Midcoast for 144 billion

first_imgCALGARY, A.B. — Enbridge Inc. has signed a deal to sell Midcoast Operating LP in the United States for about $1.44 billion.The Calgary-based company says Midcoast, which has natural gas and natural gas liquids gathering, processing, transportation and marketing businesses in Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana, is being bought by AL Midcoast Holdings LLC for US$1.12 billion.Enbridge chief executive Al Monaco says the sale of Midcoast is an important step in the company’s shift to a pure regulated pipeline and utility model. The sale was the second big deal announced by Enbridge today. In a separate agreement, the company is selling a stake in a group of its renewable power assets to the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board for $1.75 billion.Enbridge has set a goal of selling $3 billion in non-core assets this year.The transaction is expected to close in the third quarter, subject to regulatory approvals and customary closing conditions.last_img read more

BC government launches new healthcare strategy

first_imgAlso part of the new strategy is the implementation of primary care networks that will be the backbone to the team-based approach. The networks will allow patients access to a full range of health-care options from maternity to end of life, streamlining referrals from one provider to another, and providing better support to family physicians, nurse practitioners, and other primary health-care providers. The networks are being rolled out in the first five communities, including Burnaby, Comox, Prince George, Richmond and South Okanagan Similkameen. The networks will be rolled out in at least 15 communities over the next 12 months, and across 70 percent of B.C. communities over the next three years. VANCOUVER, B.C. — Premier John Horgan announced today that the B.C. government is launching a new primary health-care strategy to deliver faster and improved access to health care in the province.At the heart of the strategy is a new focus on team-based care that will see government fund and recruit more doctors, nurse practitioners and other health professionals, to put patients back at the centre of health-care delivery. The government says it will put the initial priority on addressing the shortage of general practitioners in the province by funding up to 200 new general practitioners to work in the new team-based care model.“By improving how we connect people to care, we can help make sure that British Columbians get the health care they need faster and closer to home,” said Premier Horgan. “The kind of care people need, and how it’s delivered, has to change. It’s no longer as simple as a doctor-patient relationship. We need to be looking forward and providing team-based care that better meets the needs of British Columbians. In every community I visit, patients, doctors, nurses and other health-care professionals all say the same thing: ‘Health care delivery must become more patient centred.’ We’re getting the job done.”last_img read more

Aya Ram Gaya Ram culture gains pace in Odisha

first_imgBhubaneswar: With a few weeks left for Lok Sabha and assembly polls and major parties busy in finalising candidates, ‘Aya Ram Gaya Ram’ culture seems to be gaining momentum in Odisha. Many leaders, including sitting MPs and MLAs, are now changing party loyalty fearing denial of tickets or defeat in the upcoming polls. Those who had soured their relations with the state leadership are also crossing over from one party to another. BJDs sitting MP from Nabarangpur Balabhadra Majhi left the ruling party alleging “neglect” and joined the BJP within 36 hours of resigning from the BJD. Also Read – Encounter under way in Pulwama, militant killedBalabhdra quit the BJD in the backdrop of speculation about the party fielding Odishas SC & ST Development Minister Ramesh Chandra Majhi as its candidate from Nabarangpur Lok Sabha seat. Two ex-BJD leaders – former Kendrapara MP Baijayant Panda and former minister Damodar Rout – have also joined the BJP, vowing to oust Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik. Panda had resigned from the ruling BJD while Rout was expelled from the ruling party long ago. They were inducted into the BJP ahead of the elections. “I have severed 45 years of relationship with the Janata Parivar as I was expelled from the BJD for no reason. I feel the BJP has the determination to dislodge 19-year-old Naveen Patnaik government,” Rout said. Salipur MLA of Congress Prakash Behera resigned on Saturday alleging “negligence by the state party leadership”. Also Read – 14-yr-old girl raped, strangled to death in UP’s ShamliThough Beheras name was cleared by the Pradesh Election Committee for becoming a candidate in 2019 polls, he quit the party ahead of elections. Behera joined the BJP in Delhi on Sunday. Three other sitting Congress MLAs have also quit the grand old party in the run up to elections in Odisha. They are Nabakishore Das (Jharsuguda), Jogesh Singh (Sundergarh) and Krushna Chandra Sagaria (Koraput). Das and Singh joined the BJD, while Sagaria went to the Bahujan Samaj Party. BJD MLA from Nilagiri in Balasore district Sukant Kumar Nayak also left the party alleging neglect. Sources close to him said he may join the saffron party. Nayaks resignation came after the BJD inducted Nilagiris BJP leader Sushma Biswal into the party fold.last_img read more

Twelve hurt as German train crashes into lorry

first_imgBerlin: A passenger train slammed into a lorry that became stranded on a rail line in northern Germany on Wednesday, injuring twelve people, two of them seriously, police said. The crash at around 4:30am (0230 GMT) at a level crossing in Alt Duvenstedt, near Flensburg, derailed the regional train, which was carrying 22 passengers. “All of those injured were taken to hospital,” a police spokesman told AFP, adding one victim of the crash was flown by helicopter to hospital in the port city of Kiel. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince Salman ‘snubbed’ Pak PM Imran, recalled his private jet from US: ReportThe accident happened when the cab of the articulated lorry, towing 70 tonnes of heavy equipment, became stranded at the level crossing. The driver jumped clear before the crash, police told news agency DPA. Police said it was unclear why the truck became stuck at the crossing. The impact badly damaged the front of the train, which was lifted off the tracks. Rail travel between Flensburg and Hamburg is expected to be severely disrupted for most of Wednesday, police said, because of damage to overhead lines and the tracks. “A special train from (national rail operator) Deutsche Bahn is coming to get the train that crashed back on the rails,” a police spokesman told daily Bild.last_img read more

Sophomore defensive back Najee Murray suspended from Ohio State football team

Sophomore defensive back Najee Murray has been suspended from the team, according to coach Urban Meyer.Meyer said Sunday the reason for Murray’s suspension is “a training camp issue.”Initial reports were that Murray had been dismissed from the team. OSU spokesman Jerry Emig said Wednesday that there have been no updates on his status since Meyer said he was suspended at OSU Media Day.Murray played in six games in 2012, mostly on special teams, before he tore his ACL while in practice. He recorded three solo tackles before the injury.Murray did not respond to The Lantern’s request for comment.