13 championship events for Gibson McCook Relays

first_imgThe prestigious and exciting Gibson McCook Relays, slated for Saturday, February 27, will see the 4×200 metres Girls’ Open and the 4×200 metres for Class One and Two boys upgraded to championship events.These events will be part of a stellar cast of 13 mouthwatering championship showpieces inside what is expected to be a jam-packed National Stadium.The three events have been added by the organisers due to their prominence at the IAAF World Relays in recent years.Local appliance and furniture retail franchise Singer expressed delight with being drawn as sponsor of the 4x100m Institution Men’s Championship race, an event that could see Racers Track Club kingpins Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake, and other members of their institution square off against other top-level challengers.Besides Singer, 12 other championship marquee event sponsors were named last Thursday at the Knutsford Court Hotel in New Kingston, ahead of the Gibson McCook Relays’ 40th staging.Advanced Scales and Equipment snapped up the 4x100m high school boys’ Class One Championship, while the 4x100m High School Girls’ Under-19 Championship will be sponsored by Consumer Brand (Oral B).Beverage brand Lucozade will sponsor the 4x100m High School Boys Class Two Championship, while for the girls, Wisynco will sponsor the 4x100m High School Under-17.EVENT SPONSORSThe 4x400m High School Boys’ Open went to SOS Foods Limited and the girls’ equivalent went to CIBC First Caribbean International Bank, while Grace Foods will be the sponsor of the 4x400m Institution Men’s Championship.The 4x400m Institution Men’s Championship will be sponsored by Grace Foods, 4x400m High Schoolgirl’s Open by CIBC First Caribbean, and the 4x400m High School Boys’ Open sponsored by SOS Foods.Jamaica Biscuit Company and Consumer Brands (Head and Shoulders) selected the Boys and Girls’ High School 4x800m Open, respectively.There were 42 sponsored events for the Gibson McCook Relays, which is one of the most prestigious relay meets in the world.It began in 1976 in honour of Kingston College founder Bishop Percival Gibson and was later renamed after Neville ‘Teddy’ McCook.last_img read more

Man United marquee striker signing: Kane, Lewandowski and three more fantastic forwards on the radar

first_img 5 5 1. Harry Kane – The Tottenham striker proved himself to be an old-fashioned poacher last season. Many of his 21 goals came from inside the 18-yard box, drawing comparisons to the way former Red Ruud van Nistelrooy used to play. However, no club relishes doing business with Spurs chairman Daniel Levy, particularly Manchester United. Ed Woodward may want to save his strength for negotiating a move for Hugo Lloris if David De Gea leaves. 5 2. Karim Benzema – The Real Madrid frontman has been linked with a move to Old Trafford every summer since he rejected Sir Alex Ferguson’s overtures in 2009. He often gets overlooked when talking about the Spanish side’s superstars and with suggestions Cristiano Ronaldo could be set for more of a central role this season, Benzema could be on the move. Real Madrid and Manchester United have a strong recent history of transfers between them and negotiations would certainly be easier than any with Tottenham. 4. Robert Lewandowski – Again, it will be difficult to clinch a deal as a result of Rummenigge’s comments but the Polish striker’s agent did not completely close the door. He said it would take a fee in excess of £35m and his client would be open to a move to the Premier League. Lewandowski probably represents the best option for United and would arguably take the least amount of time to settle into the Premier League (apart from Kane, obviously). 5 5 Manchester United have hit the ground running with their transfer activity this summer with four new recruits already through the door at Old Trafford.However, there have also been a number of exits leaving Wayne Rooney as the only senior striker in the squad following the departures of Robin van Persie and Ramadel Falcao.Originally, it looked like a two-way shootout between Edinson Cavani and Christian Benteke for Rooney’s new strike partner.But these targets look unlikely now, with Liverpool set to meet the Belgian’s £32.5m buyout clause and fans uncertain about whether Cavani is the man to lead the Red Devils to a 21st title.So who else is on Louis van Gaal’s radar? talkSPORT investigates the options … 3. Thomas Muller – Another player who has been linked with United a lot over the last few years. While not an out-and-out striker in the conventional sense, the German is a proven goalscorer, as well as a player who can perform in every attacking role on the pitch and would easily be able to work around Rooney, Angel Di Maria, Juan Mata and Memphis Depay. However, securing his services could be difficult with Bayern Munich not willing to help strengthen a Champions League rival. When revealing Bastian Schweinsteiger’s move to United, Bayern chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge said “I can reassure all the fans – we will not be selling another player to Manchester United”. 5. Zlatan Ibrahimovic – On the surface this sounds more like fan fiction than fact but there is some plausibility in the move. Ibrahimovic is 33 years old and has played in all of Europe’s top leagues, except the Premier League and Bundesliga. There were reports in March of this year suggesting the Sweden international could well be on his way to Old Trafford. However, with Van Gaal trimming the wage bill with the departures of big earners such as Nani, Robin van Persie and Falcao, Ibrahimovic would have to take a pay cut from his current £200,000 a week contract.last_img read more

A fairy tale come true

first_imgSpeech by former president FW de Klerk on 8 September 2010, Pestana Chelsea bridge hotel, london.“The legacy of the first African world cup – let’s make sure it’s just the beginning”.Six years ago the Fairy Godmother – in the guise of Sepp Blatter – waved a magic wand, and announced that South Africa had been chosen to host the 2010 FIFA World Cup. For the first time in history, Africa – the Cinderella continent – had been chosen to host the world’s premier sporting event.Mind you, had it not been for a little legerdemain and the mysterious voting of the FIFA representative from Oceana, South Africa – and not Germany – would have hosted the preceding World Cup in 2006. President Nelson Mandela who had attended the announcement in 1999 with great expectations, remarked laconically “Ah well… there evidently were some aspects of the end game that we South Africans did not fully understand.”So, in the 2004 announcement, it was Africa’s turn. Sepp Blatter had all but promised that no more ugly first-world stepsisters would be permitted to jump the queue.From that moment the countdown started.Would South Africa be able to make the grade?Would an African country actually be able to deliver a top class world event?Would we be able to turn our third world pumpkins and mice into of the glittering stadiums, airports and infrastructure that the event would require?The world was skeptical. We heard again the old familiar choruses that precede all major global sporting events, wherever they are held: The stadiums would not be ready; security was inadequate; the infra-structure of airports, railways and roads would simply not be able to cope.The skepticism continued right until the eve of the event. In May this year YouGovStone, on behalf of SABMiller, carried out research among its network of influential people to establish their views on the coming event. The results were, to say the very least, discouraging:Only 29% of those polled thought that the World Cup in South Africa would be a great success;58% expected that there would be problems with security;57% thought that there would be transport and logistics problems; and59% thought that the average South African would not benefit from the event.Most South Africans, on the other hand, had little doubt about our ability to hold a successful World Cup. After all, we had already hosted very successful Rugby and Cricket World Cups in 1995 and 2003. In 2009 – at the drop of a hat – we had been able to step into the breach and host India’s wildly popular 20/20 Cricket Competition after the security situation in India had made it necessary to move the event.The fact is that one of South Africa’s strengths is its ability to manage large projects. We have excellent – and highly competitive – civil engineering companies that successfully participate in and manage large projects all over the world.If anything, South Africans were a little too optimistic. One of our leading real estate companies provided advice to home owners on how they could convert their homes into B&Bs and make fortunes during the four weeks of the World Cup. As a result, hundreds of expectant homeowners built luxury guest suites and waited forlornly for bookings that never came. Small entrepreneurs seriously overestimated the number of visitors who would come to South Africa for the event.Restaurateurs geared up for a bumper season – but most were deeply disappointed: not only did international crowds not descend on their eateries, their regular South African customers also stayed away in droves because for a whole month they were glued to their TV screens watching soccer!Despite all this, Danny Jordaan, the Chairman of the local organizing committee, and his team made steady progress.Magnificent new stadiums were built – and old ones were renovated and refurbished.New highways and rapid transit systems were constructed.South Africa’s major airports were vastly expanded and modernized. After years of being cocooned in hoardings and scaffolds, Cape Town’s new international airport emerged just before the World Cup like a gigantic crystal butterfly.In our major cities large clocks counted down the days to the opening match on 11 June.Our leading companies jumped onto the bandwagon and helped to sweep up national support. Government, opposition, religious and civil society leaders embraced one another and exhorted the nation to make a success of the event. Unprecedented security arrangements were made and special courts were established to dispense swift justice to law-breakers.In the process, South Africans also learned that the FIFA fairy godmother was not motivated solely by altruism. She made it clear that she – and she alone – would choose Cinderella’s ball gown and accessories. Apparently unconcerned about any practical implications, Sepp Blatter insisted that the Cape Town Stadium should be built in Green Point – because he thought it would look pretty with Table Mountain as its backdrop. The City would rather have upgraded the existing Newlands Stadium – or built a new stadium at Culembourg, close to existing rail and road routes. However, FIFA was adamant that it would either be Green Point – or there would be no games in Cape Town at all.Most of the accessories – including the flags, vuvuzelas and even Zumi, the World Cup mascot, were manufactured in Asia. Companies that were not official FIFA sponsors were prohibited from displaying their wares or advertising anywhere near the games. Our stadiums were suddenly flooded with American Budweiser beer – a virtually unknown product – and our own excellent Castle Lager was nowhere in sight.Nevertheless, it worked.For a glorious month South Africans laid down the burden of our divided history and joined one another in a magnificent national festival.The noise of our divisive national debate – of the Julius Malemas and right wing extremists – was drowned out by the discordant but joyous blare of the Vuvuzela.The only colours that were important were the colours of the South African flag. Hundreds of thousands of South Africans festooned their cars, taxis and trucks with the national flag.Enterprising university students developed and marketed socks, emblazoned with the flags of participating nations, that fitted snuggly over car wing mirrors.We celebrated wildly when, against all expectations, Bafana Bafana drew against Mexico. We commiserated with one another when we lost to Uruguay and had to exit the competition. Nevertheless, despite our 83rd ranking we did quite well and performed better than many other countries – including France – that were much higher up the international ladder.Once we had been knocked out, South Africans switched their allegiance whole-heartedly and without reservation to Africa’s best remaining hope, Ghana. Black South Africans were surprised that nearly all whites identified with Africa – with Baghana, Baghana – rather than with England or some other European country.When Ghana sadly – and unluckily – left the fray, many black South Africans returned the compliment and supported Holland, because of its historic ties to many of their white compatriots. Such were the times and such was the spirit that animated our people for that magic month in the depth of the southern winter.But as with all fairy tales the clock struck twelve.Cinderella had to scurry down the palace steps, and confront again the harsh realities of our national life. The party was over. The bunting was removed. Our national attention shifted from the empty stadiums to the continuing poverty and inequality in which too many South Africans continue to live. The vuvuzelas were silent. Strident voices again began to dominate the national discourse.Nevertheless, during those four weeks we had successfully changed international perceptions of our country. It was clear from another survey carried out by YouGovStone on behalf of SABMiller in August 2010 that there had been a major and positive shift in attitudes toward South Africa. The survey revealed thatfully 72% believed that the World Cup would have a very positive or positive legacy for South Africa – compared to only the 29% of those polled before the event, who had thought it would be a success.54% thought that it would bring great benefits to South Africa.61% said that, as a result of the success of the World Cup, they thought that South Africa would be a good place to hold global events of all kinds.42% felt more positive about visiting South Africa as a tourist.Unfortunately, since then we South Africans have been attracting attention for all the wrong reasons. On the soccer field of international opinion we have been resolutely scoring one own goal after another.First came the Protection of Information Bill that would give government broad powers to classify virtually any information regarding its activities in the “national interest”. The effect would be to stop whistle-blowers and investigative journalists from trying to obtain and publish information on government corruption and inefficiency.Then came ANC proposals for the establishment of a Media Appeals Tribunal that would ensure “responsible” and “balanced” reporting by the press and that would lay down stiff penalties – including prison sentences – for recalcitrant journalists.This was followed by reports of a new system of land ownership which would cap the rights of South Africans to own freehold property and that would require all new foreign landowners to have local South African partners.During the past few weeks we have witnessed a protracted strike by relatively well-paid civil servants who are demanding salary increases twice the current rate of inflation. All this threatens to send the government deficit over 7% of GDP.Alas, the silly season continues. Julius Malema continues to bellow about the nationalization of the mines. President Zuma and the ANC – with a weather eye on international credit ratings – continue to insist that this is not their policy. The increasingly divergent factions within the ANC Alliance continue to circle one another, hurling insults, before the ANC’s important National General Council later this month.The situation is back to normal.Cinderella is back in the kitchen, sitting on the ash-heap. The FIFA fairy godmother has flown off to her next assignment in Brazil – weighed down by almost two hundred million dollars in profits. The Afro-pessimists have returned in strength, confident that South Africa’s World Cup success was just a flash in the pan.However, we South Africans have always been much more realistic than that.We did not expect that the World Cup would change the underlying realities of South Africa – and it did not.It did not have much impact on poverty and inequality.It did not resolve the issues of race and class that have dominated our national discourse for hundreds of years.It did not bring the scourges of AIDS and crime to an end.Anyone who expected such outcomes would really have to believe in fairy tales.However, by the same token, all these developments have not seriously undermined the strengths that made the World Cup success possible.We South Africans are remarkably resilient and have a wonderful ability to confound the pessimists. Most foreigners who have visited our shores since 1652 have confidently predicted that the country could not possibly work. But we have proved them wrong.Nobody in 1985 thought that we ourselves would be able to end apartheid and find a peaceful solution to the spiraling conflict in our society. Yet we did.After 1994 Afro-pessimists doubted that a black ANC government would possibly be able to run a sophisticated economy. But for sixteen years it has done so – and achieved uninterrupted economic growth for thirteen of those years until bankers in the northern hemisphere upset the global economic apple cart.I am confident that we will once again prove the pessimists wrong.I do not believe for a moment that the ANC will be successful with its current assault on the media. The Protection of Information Bill will be withdrawn or satisfactorily amended; and the Media Appeals Tribunal will be shelved.The current proposals relating to land tenure will wither in the light of national and international economic scrutiny. Our farmers, together with government, will hammer out a workable approach to land reform.The ANC will successfully resolve the divisions within its Alliance. Or even better, it will split and open the way to national politics based on social and economic policies rather than on race.And South Africa will retain the Rugby World Cup next year. Just you wait and see!The glorious weeks of the FIFA World Cup are receding further and further into our collective memory – but some things will remain,Including our ability to compete with the best in the world;Including the world-class infrastructure that was created for the event; andIncluding the natural beauty and the warmth and hospitality of our people that the World Cup has introduced to hundreds of millions of potential tourists.As we all know, Cinderella, in her headlong flight down the palace steps, left something of her magic behind in the form of the crystal slipper that was retrieved by Prince Charming. The FIFA World Cup left us with a similar magic legacy: it is the shining vision of the brilliant, multifaceted nation we can and will become.This, I believe, is the main legacy of the World Cup: it has shown us the nation that we can become if we all unite behind a worthy vision and work together in the spirit of June/July 2010.last_img read more

Veteran South African journalist turns to helping others

first_imgFrom teacher to broadcaster and now back to working with youth, news anchor Pat Pillai has come a long way. In his new home at LifeCo UnLtd SA, he plans to help young South Africans live lives more in the spirit of Nelson Mandela. Pat Pillai gave up his news job to run his organisation, LifeCo UnLtd SA. Through it, he aims to help young South Africans achieve big things. (Image: TV with Thinus)• My Africa Is … not what you think• Archive: Nelson Mandela at Davos • Khi Solar One: renewable energy for the ages• Using the arts to build an inclusive South Africa• Young people: own your destiny! Staff writerPat Pillai, the veteran anchorman of eNews, has left the programme to focus all his efforts on his philanthropic organisation, LifeCo UnLtd SA.The move comes after the group received an investment of R40-million to help its efforts to motivate young people to live like Nelson Mandela.Pillai, who spent more than a decade at ETV news, will now be the full-time chief executive of LifeCo UnLtd SA. He founded the organisation Life College Group in 1997, and used his free time to work there as a volunteer. It later merged with UnLtd SA to form LifeCo UnLtd SA.Online media news platform Screenafrica reports that LifeCo has helped more than 55 000 South African children, teaching them life skills and boosting academic and entrepreneurial potential.About the investment, Pillai said: “The demand for our work has grown nationally and needs a special focus. Our youth leaders and entrepreneurs need us more than ever.”One of the group’s programmes is Nelson Mandela – the Champion Within, which was launched in Port Elizabeth in 2012. In an interview with Pretoria News, Pillai said many of the self-guides in the programme were based on portions of Mandela’s writings.The programme allows students to interact with leaders in the business, political and educational sectors on issues of character, attitude, communication, tolerance and success. LifeCo hopes to expand the programme to students all over South Africa by 2020.In an interview with Global X, Pillai named his grandfather as one of the influences behind his starting LifeCo. Global X is an interview series focused on social entrepreneurs on the Skoll Foundation’s Social Edge website.Pillai’s grandfather was a waiter at the Mount Nelson Hotel in Cape Town. As a waiter, he would stand in the background, listening to people like Winston Churchill and other political leaders, as well as visiting royalty, talk during their meetings. “He said: ‘I could never sit at the table and I hope that one day my son, my grandson would be able to sit with people that lead thoughts and social change.’ And that stuck with me.”Growing up on the Cape Flats on the outskirts of Cape Town, Pillai had family members who struggled with drugs, poverty and abuse. Now, he wants to break that cycle of poverty. “We want them [students] to leave school with a wider world view, not of a slave mentality but a champion mentality.”He explained that Life College aimed to develop character education. “They would test and refine what real life projects that they will run.”Pillai was a young education student, but he chose to study drama to help with a stutter and fear of public speaking. It stood him in good stead for his broadcasting career. Pillai won a Vita Award for his work as a stage actor and appeared in the 1993 film Friends, directed by Elaine Proctor.He qualified as a teacher, however, and soon realised that the public school system was doing little to nurture a true readiness for life in its students. His first attempt at a model similar to LifeCo failed. After a few years, in 1997, he tried a second time with a revised strategy and methodology. He used the income from the sale of his drama company to launch with just 16 students.Wishing Pat Pillay all the best, I feel so sad I won’t be seeing him on etv anymore. May God bless you we will definitely miss you #farewell— Ntsikie (@ntsikiem) February 26, 2015Once again, he is leaving the public eye to return to educating the country’s youth. His last eNews bulletin was on 26 February, prompting his fans to tweet their gratitude and farewells.Patrick Controy, the managing director of ESAT, agreed, saying Pillai had played an enormous role at eNews. “He has helped us turn our nightly newscast into the most watched English news bulletin in the country.”last_img read more

Investigators could have saved Lankesh, says NCP MLA

first_imgNationalist Congress Party (NCP) MLA Jitendra Awhad on Sunday said investigating agencies could have prevented the murder of journalist Gauri Lankesh if they had taken more pains to question Virendra Tawde, the Sanatan Sanstha member arrested for planning the murder of Narendra Dabholkar. Mr. Tawde was arrested by the CBI in the Dabholkar case on June 10, 2016, and Lankesh was killed on September 5, 2017. The CBI said in court on Sunday that the two murders were linked.Mr. Awhad said, “Going by the investigating agencies, Tawde plotted the murder of Dabholkar, and Amol Kale plotted the murder of Lankesh. If the same pistol was used in both murders, it was obvious that Tawde knew about the attack on Lankesh when he was arrested. The investigating agencies failed to bring out the truth. Had they done this, they could have saved Lakesh’s life.” Mr. Tawde was also questioned by a Special Investigation Team of the Maharashtra Police in the murder of communist leader Govind Pansare. Since the Karnataka Police have arrested Mr. Kale, the alleged plotter of the Lankesh murder, the Maharashtra ATS has arrested several people for planning attacks in the State and seized explosives and ammunition from them. The CBI has arrested Sachin Andure, an alleged shooter of Dabholkar. Mr. Awhad said, “The State police seem to be working under political pressure. A joint effort of the Karnataka and Maharashtra police is needed to get to the truth.”last_img read more

ICC appoints Judicial Commissioner to probe Jadeja-Anderson altercation, hearing on July 22

first_imgThe International Cricket Council (ICC) has appointed Gordon Lewis as the judicial commissioner to hear the ICC Code of Conduct case against James Anderson of England, and will also hear the charge against India’s Ravindra Jadeja.Lewis is Australia’s representative on the ICC Code of Conduct Commission and his appointment was finalised after the England cricket team responded to the notice of charge.The ICC also confirmed that the Judicial Commissioner has convened a preliminary hearing after the Lord’s Test Tuesday morning. This will take place via telephone conference call in which the Judicial Commissioner will address any preliminary issues that need to be resolved prior to setting the hearing date and will also explain the procedure that will be followed at the hearing.Anderson has been charged under Level 3 while Jadeja has been levelled with a Level 2 charge of the ICC Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel by rival managers following an alleged incident that took place on the second day of the first cricket Test at Trent Bridge last week.last_img read more

Have a great fundraising idea? Prototype it.

first_imgJono Smith at Event360 asked me to share the following contest with you. Since I imagine the readership of this blog has thousands of big fundraising ideas, I’m inviting you to participate!By Jono SmithIt’s been said that “prototyping is the language of innovation.”A video of the human experience of your proposed new event concept is a prototype. Used correctly, an Excel spreadsheet is a prototyping tool. Google’s Gmail started out as a prototype. A temporary pop-up shop is a prototype. So how do you prototype fundraising ideas?Last week, The Jimmy Fund launched its “Big Ideas Contest,” a competition that encourages community involvement in the prototyping of new fundraising ideas on a large scale. Not only does this initiative “engage the public in creating the Jimmy Fund’s next great fundraising initiative to help conquer cancer,” it also inspired a judging panel filled with CEOs from such prominent companies and organizations as Legal Sea Foods, Stop & Shop, The Kraft Group, the Boston Red Sox, BJ’s Wholesale Club, and others. What a great idea to engage both the business community and the public in a collective effort to help conquer cancer.The contest is open to anyone with creative fundraising ideas and people are encouraged to think big. Nothing is off limits — events, apps, products, promotions — anything that is a feasible and viable fundraising idea will be considered. And, as if helping advance the Jimmy Fund’s mission isn’t enough incentive, there are prizes, including Boston Red Sox and New England Patriots tickets (a great tie-in for this iconic New England-based charity). For more on how to enter, visit the Big Ideas Contest site. The campaign’s tagline is “YOUR IDEA can change the course of cancer.” So what’s keeping you from making your next big fundraising idea real?Jono Smith is vice president of marketing at Event 360.last_img read more

Why did people donate $700,000 online to a bullied bus monitor?

first_imgThis is the question recently posed* by Slate’s Seth Stevenson in reference to the case of Karen Klein, the bullied bus monitor in upstate New York. Students called her horrible names and brought her to tears. When video of her torment was posted online, a groundswell of appalled people donated more than $700,000 to a spontaneous campaign on IndieGoGo. (Klein accepted the money, retired and put $100,000 of the sum toward an anti-bullying cause she created.)As Stevenson notes, campaigns to help suffering individuals crop up online everyday – including for people in life and death situations – but they rarely spark the scale of reaction to Karen Klein. What was it about this particular situation that prompted a response from 32,000 donors?Stevenson asked Stephen Reicher, a psychology professor at Scotland’s University of St Andrews, and Reicher cited the following factors – which should be familiar to those of us who enjoy reading about behavioral economics!1. A tangible cause: As Reicher told Stevenson, “To say lots of people are suffering is an abstract concept. To see this one woman suffering, and be able to help her, is more concrete.” This is the identifiable victim or singularity effect I’ve often cited on this blog.2. Archetypal elements: Reicher talked about how the video causes us to flash back to our own childhoods on the school bus, which is powerful. It also inverts roles – the children are bullying the adult, which seemed to evoke strong emotions. This reminds me of the Story Wars idea — that basic universal themes unite audiences around causes.3. Online dynamics: The network effects of the Internet encourage piling on – and can guide our actions. We see this in fundraising all the time – collective action begets more collective action. We join the crowd.Bottom line? What we know works, worked in a big way because of Karen Klein’s story. Remember that, above all, is always the root of every movement. There is someone who stood for something – or meant something to us – and everything grows from that.*Hat tip to Clam Lorenz for sending me this article!last_img read more

5 Things to Do After Your Big Giving Day

first_imgAfter a monster giving day, you may want to just spend a week recovering from all the work and excitement of the event. That said, the real opportunity lies not just in the donations and new donors acquired on the day itself, but rather in the long-term potential of these supporters. Here are five things to do that will help you harness the momentum of your giving day: 1. Get out the thank you. If you haven’t yet, send that thank you ASAP. 2. Examine donor information and behavior. Do these donors look different than your normal annual fund supporters? Did your existing donors give in new ways? Analyzing these details will help you understand how giving days fit into your overall fundraising strategy.3. Determine which methods resulted in the most support. Look at your promotional efforts and rate how they performed. If you had supporters and volunteers helping to raise funds, pinpoint who had the most influence and be sure to cultivate them as champions of your work.4. Have a special orientation plan for donors you acquired during your giving day. It’s likely that these new donors aren’t as familiar with your organization as other prospects. Create a welcome series to introduce your work and let these new supporters know why your community is so special.5. View this webinar. While vital, perfecting the art of donor relationships isn’t easy. This on-demand webinar presentation features the Donor Relations Guru herself, Lynne Wester, who offers tips that will help you think through your communications and stewardship plans.last_img read more

Create a Style Guide That’s Useful and Used (Part Two)

first_imgRead Part OneUse this Start-to-Finish Checklist to Build a Useful GuideIdentify your Consistency Czar—the person on your team in charge of creating and managing the style guide. Your czar should be a content expert, good listener, and diplomatic powerhouse. She is the single person who will answer questions and make yes or no usage decisions. The czar will update the style guide to include responses to frequently asked questions and revise existing standards (or the coverage thereof) as needed.Enlist relevant colleagues as guide helpers and users right up front. Make sure you let colleagues who write, review and revise, or use content know what you’re up to. Position the guide as a tool that will save them time and effort (less revision) and increase campaign effectiveness. Ask for their input as needed in the development process and as users.Collect what you do now (editorial, graphic, and brand habits) and relevant examples from other organizations. Include pages printed in color from your website, e-news, blog, Facebook page and other social channels, and online fundraising campaigns, as well as print materials.Review your samples. Spread them out in front of you or pin them to a bulletin board. Scan or photograph hard-copy samples, and upload everything to a Pinterest board for easy sharing with colleagues and to build an archive of your process and options. Select the standards that work best in each editorial guideline category and each graphic guideline category. Start by removing items, colors, and styles that clearly don’t fit your organization’s brand or personality. Next, review the remaining elements to remove any that are inconsistent with the core approach you see developing.Get input on your draft from colleagues and external audiences, if possible. Solicit feedback from your colleagues who create and/or count on effective communications. Your outreach will double to build buy-in, which will increase the probability they’ll use the style guide. Once complete, run an abbreviated draft by your marketing advisory group, composed of supporters who are willing to give you five to 10 minutes monthly, since your prospects and supporters matter most!Finalize your standards and write them in clear, succinct language, illustrated with examples.9 Steps to Getting Buy-In for Your Style GuideYour style guide, no matter how clear and thorough, is worth absolutely nothing if it’s not used. Here’s how to make sure it’s used correctly, frequently, and as happily as possible.Make your style guide:Searchable. Whether you produce your guide as a Word doc, PDF, or simple website (see this example from the Alzheimer’s Society in the UK), make sure it’s easy for users to quickly search for and find what they need.Easy to use while writing. Many of your writers and designers will want to have the style guide open in front of them as they work, either in a separate window while they’re writing in Word or in hard copy (there are still some die-hard paper fans). Test the guide to make sure it’s usable this way.Available in hard copy or formatted to print in a flash. Some folks—especially those who create a lot of content for your organization—will want to browse the guide, which they might find easier in print.Integrated into your authoring platform. There’s nothing easier for writers than having standards built right into their authoring tool, whether it’s Word or your organization’s content management system. You can set your tool to highlight words, phrases, or grammar usage that aren’t in your standards or to automatically style font sizes and colors of headlines and subheads.Quick to edit and update. The more current and relevant your style guide, the more likely it’ll be used. On the other hand, if users see lots of outdated elements, errors, or gaps, they’ll stay away.A simple website format can be the easiest to update and distribute.Train and support your colleagues in using the style guide.You’ve already taken the first steps in updating relevant colleagues on the guide, soliciting input on your draft and asking them to use it ahead of release (stressing its value to them), and welcoming some of them into the guide development review process.Your guide launch is a perfect time to train your colleagues in its use. You can do this in person, via video (great for multiple sites), or over the phone. I recommend you train the key department representatives and make them “keepers of the guide,” rather than training everyone. Whatever training approach you take, also outline this info in the guide as an ongoing reference.Feature:The WIIFM—“What’s in it for me?” This is the value for your colleagues of using the guide).Who should use the style guide and how. Illustrate your vision with several concrete scenarios, ideally those that frequently occur and that most colleagues are familiar with.Contacts and the process for questions, revisions, and updates.A huge thanks!Useful Models: Nonprofit Style GuidesThese models range from the Audubon Institute’s one-pager, which might be enough for your organization, to the mammoth Rutgers University style guide. The more complex your organization, programs or services, and audiences, the more in-depth you’ll need to make your style guide.Consider contacting your communications colleagues at these organizations to learn more about the development and use of these guides: Read Part OneDoes your organization currently have a style guide, including editorial and/or visual standards? If so, please share the link and/or how the guide has helped (or not). Editorial Style GuideVisual Identity Manual Audubon InstituteCommunity Partnership for Arts and CultureCPAC Brand GuidelinesCPAC Style Guidelines Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Editorial Style GuideNational Association for Music Education Style GuideRutgers Universitylast_img read more