Mid Season Crop Scouting Tips

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest As the calendar turns to July, many corn and soybean fields are well on their way. Due to the very challenging spring, however, scouting those fields throughout the growing season will be key. Matt Hutcheson, Product Manager for Seed Consultants, gives some tips on what to scout for over the summer.last_img

This time, Montalbo plays hero for La Salle vs Ateneo

first_imgKammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa The Bacolod native said atoning for his costly turnover in the first duel was the least of his concerns.“I wasn’t thinking of making up for that (mistake). I just want to play my game and be aggressive,” he said after winging up with six points, three rebounds, and three assists.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“Coach told me to calm down. Eventually, I did,” he said. “Coach called for a play, didn’t see anyone open because they were denying, and I saw the lane and took what the defense gave me.”It also helps that Ayo continues to trust Montalbo and that faith allows the fourth-year guard to play his usual game. “To have a coach like that really means a lot for the confidence level of one player. If you’re open, you can take the shot. If you’re free take it. Whoever deserves to be on the court will play. Even if I’m on the bench or on the court, I’ll do my best,” he said.La Salle heads to the Final Four with a twice-to-beat advantage against No. 4 Adamson and Montalbo said the team is right where it wants to be.“We’re really confident. Hopefully, we’ll peak on time. It ain’t over until it’s over and we won’t stop until we get that crown,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Archers, Eagles favorites to win UAAP Season 80 PLAY LIST 02:36Archers, Eagles favorites to win UAAP Season 8000:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. No sweep: La Salle takes down top seed Ateneo Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Kib Montalbo. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netLast time La Salle and Ateneo met, Kib Montalbo lost the ball on the inbounds play which led to the Blue Eagles taking a 76-75 victory in the first round.On Sunday, Montalbo was the hero after drilling the go-ahead floater with 40.3 seconds left in the Green Archers’ 79-76 win abd deal the Blue Eagles their first defeat of UAAP Season 80.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 LATEST STORIES CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Read Next QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillionlast_img read more

The 3 Things Your Donor Thank You Must Do

first_imgEditor’s note: This article was adapted from the webinar presentation “Why They Leave and How to Get Them Back” with Kivi Leroux Miller and Katya Andresen. It was originally published on December 27, 2012 and has been updated. Want to start the off on the right foot with your donors?  Take the time to show your gratitude and to differentiate yourself in a way that advances your mission and deepens your relationships with donors. Remember: having a memorable thank you is the first step in retaining more donors.Photo Source: Big Stock PhotoTry these three ways to wow your donors with your next thank you letter.Show the impact.Don’t lead with, “Thank you for your gift of $25 on December 5.”  Lead with something that captures the true story of the impact. Lead with the success they are helping to achieve. That’s what the donor wants. They don’t want to know that you deposited $25 in your bank account on December 5. They want to know you are spending that $25 to make a difference in the world.Open the door.Share with your donors the other ways they can be involved with your cause. Invite them to an open house or participate in other programs. Educate them on what they can do in their own life to help your cause and if you have volunteer opportunities, let them know how to join in. Think of the different ways people can learn more about your organization and get even more involved in making a difference.Set expectations.Let donors know when they will hear from you again. If you add them to your mailing list, make sure you have an interesting and inspiring newsletter. Don’t just start slamming people with a bunch of boring information and ask them for money all the time. Create a newsletter that that continues to engage people’s spirit and report back on the results they helped make possible. Plan ongoing updates that will let donors know about all the great stuff that they’re making possible.last_img read more

How to Get People to Open Your Nonprofit Email

first_imgIt’s no secret that, just like we do, our supporters get a lot of emails each day. On average, individuals receive over a hundred messages per day, each one clamoring for their attention and competing with your fundraising appeal, nonprofit newsletter or member update. The inbox is a crowded place, so how do you stand out and ensure that your emails are being opened? Photo Source: Big Stock PhotoHere are seven quick tips for better subject lines:1. Test.Before you send out an email to a large portion of your audience, test two different subject lines with a smaller subset of your list.  Make this part of your normal process, so you get smarter every time.2. Personalize. Use something personally relevant to the reader to grab their attention.3. Be interesting.Make your subject line oddly short, long or different. Above all, make it interesting, so people open the message in the first place.4. Make it fresh.Don’t say “update” or “news” each time. Instead, just focus on what’s actually new!5. Keep it brief.Subject lines often get cut off in many email programs, put key information right up front.6. Instill urgency.Make it clear why your email matters now—”three days left to give.”7. Banish spam-ness.Run your copy and subject line through a content-checker, avoid all caps and shun exclamation points. The Email Sender and Provider Coalition notes that 69% of subscribers base their decision to send your message to the spam folder on the subject line.If I had to choose just one of these to convey, I concentrate on #3. My best advice for building a following is to create wonderful content and reflect it in the subject line. People open the emails they know will contain something of value. Provide that value. The rest will follow! Adapted from http://nonprofitmarketingblog.com/last_img read more

The 4 Ways to Reach Women Donors Taking Control of Their Wealth

first_img4. Finally, make the appeal for your causeOnce these women have made the right connections, and have had the right coaching and advice, they often feel a new excitement about what their wealth can accomplish in the world. Speak with them about how they give of their resources—often both time and money—and make the case for why your cause is worth it! Women today make up just under half of the nation’s millionaires. Over the next 20 years, through divorce, the death of a spouse, or inheritance, American women will control some $25 trillion dollars. This shift in wealth creates an incredible opportunity for much good to be done in the world. In my practice, I have seen that most women consider themselves to be philanthropic, and charitable organizations would be well served to provide opportunities for these women to flex their charitable muscles!Here are my tips on how to approach women who are taking the reins of their wealth for the first time, often in a crisis:1. Approach donors with empathyMajor life transitions such as the death of a spouse, divorce, and even retirement, can take a deep emotional toll, often forcing women to take more control of their financial life. Some may be prepared, but many are not. She will need time before she is ready to give to your organization as she learns how much money she has, where it is, and whether she and her family are going to be secure for the long run.2. Show her the good you doThe fact is, women think about money differently than men. As a group, women tend to be more concerned with the ultimate purpose of money rather than with an investing strategy and performance numbers. They first want to know that their money will securely carry themselves and their families through the future. After that, many women want to use their money to effect change in the world. Before you ask for money, show donors how the funds you do have are making an impact and demonstrate the good you’re already achieving.3. Invest time and support to build a long-term partnershipThere is a vast difference between winning a check from a one-time donor and building a long-term relationship with a philanthropist who is going to be dedicated to your cause for years to come. If you want a donor to partner with you over time, you should invest in them and make them feel appreciated, too. Before seeking contributions from women in transition, set your organization apart by encouraging her to seek wise counsel that can help her navigate the decisions of her new life.center_img Charlie Jordan is a Certified Financial Planner™ practitioner and partner with Brightworth in Atlanta. He advises high-net-worth clients—particularly women—in investment management and tax and estate planning and he works closely with them to establish plans for their charitable giving. He is also on the board of the Georgia Planned Giving Council.last_img read more

Be Prepared: 5 Steps to Managing a PR Crisis

first_imgExpect the best, prepare for the worst. Sounds a little gloomy, but it’s actually a great strategy. If your nonprofit has a communications plan in hand when a PR crisis hits, you’ll be glad you followed that motto. How well you emerge from a crisis hinges on how well you manage your message. 4. Restore.  The worst is over, so it’s time to focus on restoring your good reputation within the community. Keep sending out positive news through your communications channels. Update those channels early and often—more frequently than in calmer times. Share press releases, testimonials, blog posts, and so on about the great work you’ve been doing and continue to do. Whatever the format, optimize this flurry of positive online content for search engines. This will help restore your good reputation, but equally important, it will fix your SEO by pushing crisis-related results off the front page of a Web search about your organization. Out of sight, out of mind. 5. Learn.  Convene your crisis team and talk about what went well and what you’d do differently next time. Ask your key stakeholders for feedback. Include key members of your board and staff in this conversation.Did you minimize the story or let it drag on? How could you have better managed the news cycle? Did you act quickly enough? Did you hold back too much info? Roll this feedback into a revised crisis plan. These five steps are simple enough to implement whether you have just one person handling communications or an entire team. 1. Plan.  We often don’t believe we’ll find ourselves in a crisis situation and don’t plan in advance. Trust us, it can happen. Before trouble strikes, assemble your crisis team. These are people who work well together and can deliver your message calmly and consistently. Brainstorm potential crisis scenarios. Talk about if and how your organization will respond in certain situations. Prepare templates of press releases, blog posts, Web pages, even tweets and status updates that you can quickly customize to fit any situation. Not having to start from scratch when everything’s going haywire helps your team stay calm and focused.center_img 3. Monitor.  Always know what’s going on in your market. This is another area where having monitoring channels in place makes life easier. These could include traditional clipping services as well as digital channels like social media. It helps to know what people are saying about your organization and whether it’s positive or negative. A crisis doesn’t happen very often, but don’t press your luck. Create or revise your communications plan, and you’ll be ready for the next storm that blows your way. Adapted from the Nonprofit 911 webinar “Crisis Communications for Nonprofits” with Susan Kearney, COO of Network for Good. Download the full webinar. 2. Communicate.  Get your social media monitoring in place so you can spot a potential situation before it gets out of control. If you start noticing spikes of negativity, pay attention and nip it in the bud. If the issue spirals, remember the goal of crisis communications is to minimize the news cycle. Get out ahead of the situation with your prepared materials.Across all channels, deliver a consistent message. Whether it’s the evening news, local newspaper, your website or blog, people should hear consistent info about the facts of the issue, your response to it, what actions your taking, and what’s coming next. Be as transparent and honest as possible. The more up-front your message, the more credible your organization will appear.Social media in particular provides your group an opportunity to respond quickly. Again, be consistent. Don’t be defensive or negative, stay positive and matter-of-fact, and avoid commentary or opinion.last_img read more

What Is Peer-to-Peer Fundraising Anyway?

first_imgPeer-to-peer fundraising is empowering your supporter base to fundraise on your behalf. Peer-to-peer fundraising is also known as social fundraising, P2P, or personal fundraising.Think beyond the walkathonWhen you think of social fundraising, you probably think of a walkathon, dance marathon, or another event that social fundraisers will attend. Although this is the best-known type of social fundraising, you don’t have to have an event to justify launching a social fundraising campaign.Project-focused vs. mission-focused fundraisingThe most successful social fundraising campaigns are project-based campaigns. Project-based campaigns drive support and excitement about a specific initiative. It’s much easier to encourage social fundraisers to reach out to potential donors with a project-based ask than with a broad appeal.More often than not, when you send an appeal to donors, you are asking them to support your mission. You might feature a story about a client or a recent success, but the story is usually directly related to your day-to-day programming and not a specific need. I like to call this mission-focused fundraising. You are asking donors to support what you do every day. Donors’ dollars help you accomplish your mission.Project-focused fundraising asks donors to fund something specific. There’s a fundraising goal in mind and (usually) a deadline. Here’s an example: A food bank needs to upgrade its freezer by the end of the summer. The board has been recruited as social fundraisers to hit a $15,000 goal.How do you recruit social fundraisers?In a traditional fundraising model, you (the nonprofit) send appeals to acquire donors or ask existing donors to give again. In a peer-to-peer fundraising model, you must recruit and motivate supporters to step into the role of fundraiser. Then, you empower these fundraisers to ask their social circle for donations.Your peer fundraising campaign will be the most successful when you find advocates who are excited to serve as fundraisers. Start by reaching out to five to 10 loyal supporters. They could be board members or longtime volunteers. Begin recruiting with people you know and those who know your organization’s mission. Equip these social fundraisers with the tools they need to recruit donors: email templates, a peer fundraising donation page, FAQs, and confidence.When to host a peer fundraising campaignSocial fundraising campaigns see the most success when the campaign has a firm deadline. Without a date for an event (like a walkathon) on the calendar, how do you set a deadline and put pressure on your fundraisers to bring in donations during a defined time period? It’s not that hard, but you need to get creative.Think about the timing of holidays and celebrations throughout the year and how you could easily piggyback on these dates. If your cause has an awareness month, use those 30 days as your social campaign timeline. If your cause works with single mothers, a campaign ending on Mother’s Day would be a good fit.Or think about the nature of your work and any natural timelines that arise. Do you host a summer camp? Organize a social fundraising campaign a month before campers arrive, and announce the total dollars raised during the first meal the campers share together. Does your food bank host a big Thanksgiving meal? Craft a campaign in November that ends on Thanksgiving.Are you ready?Although this is not a new model of fundraising, it is evolving thanks to technology and the new ways we share stories and communicate. Peer-to-peer fundraising might be something your supporters have been waiting for. Are you ready for it? Do you have the right peer-to-peer software to help you succeed?last_img read more

How to Raise More Money in the Next 60 Days

first_imgNeed help getting your spring campaign off the ground and maximizing your fundraising results? We’ve got you covered. Download the full 60-Day Spring Fundraising Plan and then be sure to register for tomorrow’s free webinar to get practical advice on boosting donations before your fiscal year ends and summer begins. Worried about meeting your fiscal year-end goals and encourage donors to give again before summer begins? For many organizations, a smartly crafted spring campaign can boost donor acquisition, increase donations, and support donor retention—but how do you get this done when you have no time to lose?Our newest free eBook helps you create a 60-Day Fundraising Plan that will ensure you have clear targets and a path to success. Here’s an excerpt:When it comes to campaign design, what works best for one type of nonprofit could be the wrong approach for another. To create the most compelling spring campaign that will generate the greatest impact, financial and nonfinancial, consider your unique fundraising and non-fundraising objectives, then answer the following questions:1. What would the ideal results look like?2. What are you trying to accomplish?3. What call to action would motivate your target audience?4. Whom are you trying to target?5. What do you most want them to do for your organization?6. Would a one-time donation or recurring gift raise the most funds?BudgetAs ideas emerge and evolve, you will need to establish a budget for your campaign. If you already have a seasonal campaign written into your budget, great! But, realistically, do you need more resources to create the kind of campaign you have in mind? Are those funds available? Can your board members or gift-in-kind donations, an individual donor or corporate sponsor help close the gap?ScopeOnly you can decide how big or how small your campaign should be. But it’s important to define the scope about what your nonprofit can do (and, what you can’t do) to generate the best results.1. Who will you target?2. When and for how long?3. How will you engage prospective donors?4. What communication channels will you use: direct mail, email, social media, and/or through newsletters and traditional media?5. Will it be a one-time appeal or will follow-up be required?6. What response systems will need to be in place for it to be effective?7. How will follow-up and thank-you messages be managed?8. What metrics are required to quantify the effectiveness of the annual campaign?Select Campaign Lead or TeamNow that you have the basics figured out, you will need to accept or delegate the role of a campaign lead to coordinate all that is needed to successfully launch and manage the campaign. Depending on the size of your organization’s board and staff, it may be necessary to recruit volunteers as well. If certain tasks require specialized skills or your solicitation process requires a high volume of hours and labor to effectively execute and follow-up, tap into the right people to get the job done.last_img read more

Economic Consequences at the Household Level of Maternal Complications in Bangladesh

first_imgPosted on May 30, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Colleagues at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research in Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) recently published a paper, Costs of Maternal Health-related Complications in Bangladesh, in the Journal of Health, Population, and Nutrition that explores the economic repercussions on households of maternal complications in a rural setting in Bangladesh.Abstract:This paper assesses both out-of-pocket payments for healthcare and losses of productivity over six months postpartum among women who gave birth in Matlab, Bangladesh. The hypothesis of the study objective is that obstetric morbidity leads women to seek care at which time out-of-pocket expenditure is incurred. Second, a woman may also take time out from employment or from doing her household chores. This loss of resources places a financial burden on the household that may lead to reduced consumption of usual but less important goods and use of other services depending on the extent to which a household copes up by using savings, taking loans, and selling assets. Women were divided into three groups based on their morbidity patterns: (a) women with a severe obstetric complication (n=92); (b) women with a less-severe obstetric complication (n=127); and (c) women with a normal delivery (n=483). Data were collected from households of these women at two time-points—at six weeks and six months after delivery. The results showed that maternal morbidity led to a considerable loss of resources up to six weeks postpartum, with the greatest financial burden of cost of healthcare among the poorest households. However, families coped up with loss of resources by taking loans and selling assets, and by the end of six months postpartum, the households had paid back more than 40% of the loans.Read the full paper here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more