QA Matt Petersen on the TMGMcMurry Merger

first_imgHere, Petersen [pictured] speaks with FOLIO: about the deal, how the two companies compliment each other and what happens next.FOLIO: Talk about the state of the content marketing market and how it makes sense for a deal like this to come together.Petersen: We define content marketing as content that is being developed and curated in order to engage our brands’ and clients’ existing and prospective customers—engaging as opposed to interruptive. That kind of marketing has been taking off. We have not nearly hit the precipice of it, it’s only going to grow. That’s evident in how our respective companies have grown and now combined. As brands more and more take on the characteristics of media and need expert stewardship of that content, the more we are going to be a terrific value to them. FOLIO: Where do TMG and McMurry complement each other specifically? Petersen: What’s great about the two companies, culturally and from a heritage standpoint, is content is at the core of the business. With McMurry, they come with a particularly good depth and capability in video. That gives us a tremendous asset, a tremendous team to work with and the ability to bring new solutions. McMurry is also a bit larger, so we get a larger digital bench and combined with TMG it’s sizable. TMG has also grown its social media practice, which we look at from more of a social journalism process. FOLIO: Given your background at Hearst and also Meredith’s Xcelerated Marketing, how does this combined company compare to those operations in terms of business volume and revenues? Petersen: I’d say from a size perspective, we’re now, combined, the largest independent content marketing company out there. We have a full breadth of services that I would say is equal to a Meredith Xcelerated Marketing, but on a slightly smaller scale. We both have a strong heritage in content creation, which is really important for our clients. FOLIO: Going forward, where are you going to focus your growth initiatives and resources?Petersen: I think first is to be really great strategic partners with our clients and help them think through all of the opportunities that now exist with the use of content. That’s a major goal, being very solution-oriented. We’ll also want to attract new customers and I can ultimately see adding newer capabilities with our new partner in Wicks as new things emerge that are applicable and making investments that allow us to stay ahead. On Friday, FOLIO: reported that private-equity company Wicks Group made a major investment in the content marketing space in a unique, simultaneous acquisition of two companies—TMG and McMurry, two of the leading independent marketing services firms. The merger, officially announced today, creates a $100 million content marketing powerhouse, now named McMurry/TMG, LLC.  Former McMurry CEO Chris McMurry and TMG co-founders Jane Ottenberg and Richard Creighton will retain a minority interest and remain involved in the merged entity. The new CEO is Matt Petersen, who TMG hired away from Hearst as president at the beginning of 2012. Rounding out the executive team are Fred Petrovsky as COO, formerly McMurry’s president, and former TMG senior vice president, client partnerships Keith Sedlak as chief revenue officer. last_img read more

Jesse Malins Meet Me At The End Of The World EP Track

first_imgNETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Aug 5, 2017 – 5:18 pm Jesse Malin On Influences, Songwriting, New EP Track 1: “Meet Me At The End Of The World””‘Meet Me At The End Of The World'” came from listening to the news and hearing all these people talk about things I really acknowledge and believe in: global warming, what’s going on politically, what’s going on around the whole world. As always, with every generation, you feel like this is the end man: it’s the nuclear arms race, it’s Ronald Reagan, doomsday’s coming, “1984” — that play is more relevant now than ever. All these things are evil and there is a lot of evil, but you have to find a way to stay positive. I believe in the P.M.A., the Positive Mental Attitude, so ‘Meet Me At The End Of The World’ came from being inundated with all my friends that are pissed off about stuff. But you know what, you’ve got to live every day like it could be your last.Musically, the song was written with two chords at a soundcheck in Long Beach with Alejandro Escovedo and Derek Cruz, my guitarist, just jamming these two chords like the Stones or Bowie’s “Heroes” and I started to put a melody over it. … Then I finished it out in a van and me and Derek arranged it in a hotel room in Oakland.”Track 02: “Fox News Funk””It came from a jam that Derek had. It was kind of like a Clash, kind of Sandinista! thing. Again, [it was inspired by] the media blitz … and reading USA Today because it comes under the door, and realizing you don’t want to mix politics and music all the time — but life is political. You walk out your door and you’re hit with things. You have to pay for gasoline. You have to eat. You’ve got to pay rent. And [I thought about] how much the media is owned by the government, by the big corporations, so you’re not getting the full story. I think [this song is] a call to people to go beyond that, go with their guts and their hearts. You have got to treat the people around you with love, but you also have to question the powers that be, because as much as I love this country and this planet, there are some people that are out to line their own pockets and have an agenda.Track 3: “Revelations/Thirteen””‘Revelations’ is a song about a breakup that happened. I was dating a girl who had the same name as me, Jesse, and if we would have gotten married, she would have became Jesse Malin (laughs). … But we met one day to go have ‘the talk,’ like when you’ve got to break up with somebody and have the conversation, and we met at a health food restaurant — I’m a vegetarian — on East 12th Street in Manhattan called Angelica’s. I bumped into like Moby and Cyndi Lauper and John [Joseph] from the Cro-Mags there, and you know it’s just a a great spot, I wish it was still there. But [this song is] the anticipation of playing back that conversation in your head knowing you’ve got to have this talk, but after it’s done you know you’re going to be OK. And then we just went into “Thirteen” by Big Star, it’s just something that happened in the studio and we kept it. It’s one of my favorite Big Star songs.”Track 4: “London Rain””‘London Rain’ was written about our old merch girl and tour manager from the U.K. who was diagnosed with cancer and is paralyzed. She needed a wheelchair and she kept such a great outlook that we named her “The Positive Panther,” and we did a charity with Butch Walker, Joan Jett, the Eagles Of Death Metal guys, L7, Chris Stills, Tommy Stinson — just a whole bunch of people stepped up. And we raised money to get her a wheelchair. I wanted to have a song to sing at that show for her, and “London Rain” was written to do at the benefit, but it became a song that would end up on the Meet Me At The End Of The World EP as well.” Read more News From current events to breakups, New York-based singer/songwriter reveals the inspiration behind the four tracks on his new EPNate HertweckGRAMMYs Aug 5, 2017 – 5:17 pm GRAMMY.comRunning all the way across Grant Park to catch an artist you want to see is a common practice at Lollapalooza in Chicago. Friday, Aug. 4 at noon, that was me rushing to catch New York troubadour Jesse Malin on the BMI Stage for the first set of the day. Rewarded for my efforts, I entered earshot just in time to hear the shimmering reverb-drenched guitar stabs in the opening notes of “She Don’t Love Me Know,” an undeniable number from Malin’s 2015 album, New York Before The War. What followed was a blistering set of tunes plucked from Malin’s prolific career, complete with rock and roll interstitials about love, breakups and opening up for his childhood idols Kiss at Madison Square Garden. As a member of D Generation and as a solo artist, Malin has accomplished a lot throughout his career thus far. So when I caught my breath and caught up with the highly acclaimed songwriter’s songwriter backstage, he took me through each of tracks on his new four-song EP, which features a title track that was possibly the highlight of his Lollapalloza set, and easily the feel-good song of the apocalypse: “Meet Me At The End Of The World.”  Facebook Twitter center_img Dive deeper into Jesse Malin’s mind with some of his favorite summer songs on his official Lollapalooza Spotify playlist.More Lollapalooza: Bishop Briggs Talks Psychics, Music Influences Inside Jesse Malin’s New EP, Track By Track jesse-malins-meet-me-end-world-ep-track-track Jesse Malin’s ‘Meet Me At The End Of The World’ EP: Track By Track Meet Me at the End of the World Email last_img read more

Dispose of drug cases within 6 months HC

first_imgHigh-CourtThe High Court on Tuesday asked trial courts to dispose of cases filed under the Narcotics Control Act within six months, reports UNB.The HC bench of justice M Enayetur Rahim and justice Md Mostafizur Rahman passed the order while hearing a bail petition filed by an accused in a drug-related case.The court also asked the deputy commissioners, superintendents of police and investigation officers of the cases concerned to provide all kinds of assistance so that the trial proceedings are completed as soon as possible.Besides, the HC asked the state counsels and investigation officers of the cases to take necessary steps to ensure the appearance of witnesses in courts and ordered legal action in case of their failure.Assistant attorney general Yunus Mahmud Morshed said law enforcers arrested Mizanur Rahman Baroi of Rajoir upazila in Madaripur district along with 600 yaba tablets on 1 December 2015 and since then he has been in jail.“Not a single witness has so far been produced before the court in the case filed in this connection and the High Court expressed its dissatisfaction over the matter before pronouncing the order,” he said.With the order, the trial proceedings of new drug-related cases will have to be disposed of within six months after submission of charge-sheets, Yunus said.He, however, said the HC did not set any timeframe for disposing of old cases. “It only asked for completing the trial proceedings as soon as possible,” he said.last_img read more

Harvey Irma Maria and Nate Retired From List of Hurricane Names

first_img Share Hurricanes will no longer be named Harvey, Irma, Maria, or Nate.The World Meteorological Organization announced Thursday it’s retiring the names, and said they “don’t bear repeating.”Storm names are normally reused on a six-year cycle. With the newly retired storms, The World Meteorological Organization has retired 86 names since 1954. Video Playerhttps://cdn.hpm.io/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/12070232/Bars-Inverse-2018-04-12-at-7.01am.mp400:0000:0000:19Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.“Names are retired if they are so deadly or destructive that the future of their name would be insensitive,” said Dennish Feltgen, a spokesperson for NOAA’s National Hurricane Center; which is a member of the World Meteorological Organization. “You can go back through time: There’s very historical names like Audrey, and Donna, and, of course, Katrina and Rita. You don’t ever want to hear those names on a list again and they won’t be.”The names will be replaced with Harold, Idalia, Margot and Nigel and included on the 2017 that will first be used in 2023.last_img read more

Harveys Impact on Houstons Homeless Community

first_img Listen Al OrtizFile Photo – Tents set up at a homeless encampment at the intersection of Highway 59 and Caroline Street on April 21, 2017. 00:00 /00:50 A year after Hurricane Harvey, we’re still learning more about the impact of the storm on local communities.While a new study further suggests recovery remains slow for many in hard-hit areas in the region, Houston’s unsheltered homeless population also received its first uptick, since 2011. The unsheltered homeless rate was declining for years, prior to Harvey, according to the Coalition for the Homeless.Marliyn Brown, the Coalition’s President and CEO, said the group’s annual survey at the beginning of the year revealed an additional 500 unsheltered homeless people.“When we asked people, ‘What caused your homelessness,’ 18 percent said it was a result of Hurricane Harvey,” said Brown. The Coalition found 258 unsheltered homeless people in the Houston region were homeless as a direct result from Hurricane Harvey.Brown believes they will be able to catch back up with the downward trend, because their housing units weren’t as affected by the storm as they originally feared. She said they’re now back on track, to housing about 100 people per month. But, she said, long-term ramifications of the storm remain unclear.“I’m not really sure when we’ll ever know,” said Brown. “It’s not just a one-time, ‘We’ll get you back on your feet and you’ll do well.’ So, I think as far as our system, and our inventory of units, and being able to identify and help people: we’re back on track. But, I think we have a new set of conditions that are affecting people in a different way that will continue to stay with us… This is a new trauma that adds to the lack of ability to stabilize.”Brown said every large city in Texas had an increase in homelessness this year.The Texas Homeless Network estimates about 590 people in the state experienced homelessness, as a direct result from Harvey. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:center_img Share X last_img read more

The language of music unites all

first_imgA big name in the Hindustani classical music, Pandit Bhajan Lal Sopori, who has enthralled the world with his mesmerising Santoor, is now all set to steal the show with his son Abhay Rustum Sopori on the occasion of ‘Delhi Classical Music Festival’ being held in the Capital today. Millennium Post chronicles the stories of the ‘King of Strings’ and his early life musical journey with son Abhay Rustum Sopori, his live performances worldwide and his music academy SaMaPa, which works as a catalyst to healing many people. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfHow did your musical journey begin?The saga began from the year 1953 when I was only five years. I was invited to give my first live performance in Srinagar auditorium. Later, in 1954, I was delighted to be a part of a children’s show which was aired on the radio in Srinagar. Performing at the Durgiana Temple in Amritsar in 1959 was also a memorable moment. Gradually, I delved into the technicalities and nuances of Santoor. And eventually, I was able to introduce my own style – Sopori Baaj. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveYou were 10-year-old when you gave your first performance at a conference? How did you manage to create magic at such a tender age?(Smiles)… I belong to a family of music. My family has played santoor for over six generations. In addition to inheriting the quality from my father and grandfather, blessings of my loved ones especially Kashmiris was bestowed upon me. How does it feel to perform alongside your son?It brings tears of joy along with pride when you see your child blossom as an artist. It was absolutely an out-of-the-world experience to give a live performance with my son Abhay in the year 1995 at Siri Fort Auditorium in Delhi. Over the years, Abhay has grown in stature as an artist. You are both, a santoor maestro and a Guru. How would you differentiate yourself in two roles?As a Guru, my teachings to my students are always imbued with a sense of honesty and dedication towards one’s work. Above all, one must have faith in God. Never give up. Sacrifice your life if required to accomplish your mission. My grandfather and father ingrained such values in me. On the other hand, I find myself in paradise while I perform.Your music academy SaMaPa aims at healing jail inmates through music; creating a bonding between them and the society. How does your academy meet these objectives?SaMaPa is just not a music school, but a relaxing agent as well. It was established keeping in mind the active promotion of classical music, especially among jail inmates. I remember the memorable moments spent with the prisoners. The bright smiling faces of the prisoners the moment we begin music is all I can see. Therefore, music is the best healer of pain. I have attempted to break the stigma attached to prisoners in society, through music. My son and I decided to bring out their musical side. I was amazed to see them composing ghazals of Sufi tradition and have always tried to encourage them to realise their untapped potential, pursue their interests and showcase their talent to society. You are considered as the ‘cultural bridge’ between Jammu and Kashmir and the rest of India. How do you think music links all cultures?I firmly believe in the fact that India stands as a unified nation when we talk about its own culture and music. The language of music unites all regardless of regional differences as our culture is our pride. Which nation you think is most welcoming in terms of music?I have taught music to students of Washington University in the US. Also, I was invited to perform in European Parliament in Brussels. My performances have been broadcast in India which was seen by Indians and audiences of Belgium, Norway, Egypt, England, Germany, Syria and the US. I have noticed that music has no language and knows no boundaries. Most importantly, respect, love and devotion are the three prime factors needed to appreciate music. If you love and feel the music, it can be understood by everyone irrespective of their nationality.last_img read more

Will the Workplace Lead Wearable Technology Adoption

first_img 3 min read Consumer adoption of devices such as smart watches, eyeglasses, or fitness monitors is far from mainstream, at least from a global view. Still, almost three-quarters of the 9,100-plus people surveyed last month by Harris Interactive see potential benefits in workplace efficiency, productivity, and safety. Positive sentiment is especially high in Mexico, India and China.The research was conducted on behalf of the Workforce Institute at human resources software and services company Kronos. The online poll during early September (right around the time of the Apple Watch launch) reached 9,126 adults ages 18 or older in Australia, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Mexico, and the United States.“There’s a strong belief that wearable technology will take off in the workplace before the home because devices such as smart watches, intelligent ID badges, and fitness and health monitors can provide organizations with uncharted data collection points to greatly improve safety, productivity, collaboration, and overall workplace effectiveness,” says Workforce Institute director Joyce Maroney, in a statement about the findings.She notes: “And while more and more types of wearable technologies have hit the market, the concept of wearables at work isn’t new. Workers have been wearing uniforms, safety gear, ID badges, communications headsets, and so on for years to do their jobs better.”As a whole, U.S. adults were the least optimistic respondents. For example, only 48% saw a workplace benefit from wearables, versus almost 96% in Mexico, 94% in China and 91% in India. Approximately 13% of the U.S. respondents used wearables in their personal lives, compared with 73% of those from China.The U.S. prospects for wearables in the workplace look far brighter if you look at responses from just those classified as students: almost 72% could cite at least one business benefit (compared with 48% of all U.S. respondents).That finding echoes separate survey results released last week by PricewaterhouseCoopers that suggest 53% of Millennials are “excited” about the future of wearables, particularly in retail, entertainment, and personal healthcare applications.To that end, it’s worth noting that data generated by wearables, particularly fitness bracelets that monitor exercise and health vitals, is fast becoming a must-have component of products and services offered by weight-loss businesses.On Tuesday, Medifast disclosed a partnership with Fitbit and joined competitors Weight Watchers and Nutrisystems in launching apps for tracking nutrition, weight, sleep patterns and other data integral to gauging progress. “Studies show that people who use journaling and tracking systems have far greater success with healthy weight management than those who do not,” said Medifast CEO Mike MacDonald, in a statement.Whether the weight-loss industry is getting ahead of itself remains to be seen. Then again, there could be 130 million wearable devices on people’s wrists, heads and bodies by 2018—an adoption rate akin to those for tablet computers. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global This story originally appeared on Fortune Magazine October 29, 2014last_img read more

Uber Lights Up Drivers Windshields to Help Customers Find Their Rides

first_imgDecember 3, 2015 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Register Now » 2 min readcenter_img Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Uber is giving its customers a guiding light. The popular ride-hailing company is rolling out LED light strips on drivers’ windshields to help riders in Seattle identify their pickups.The bright, new initiative, simply called SPOT, aims to reduce wait times and to make it easier for customers to find their Ubers in dense traffic and in the dark. Announced earlier this week, the feature rolls out throughout this month in the Emerald City on a test basis, with the company already equipping an undisclosed number of drivers there with the innovative devices.Related: Uber Is Eating Up Taxi Rides in New York CityHow it works: Directly applied to windshields, the long, skinny light strips glow in multiple colors (blue, green, orange, pink, purple or yellow). When a rider requests a trip and is paired with a SPOT-enabled driver, she can select the color the driver’s light strip will display using a color wheel within the Uber app. When the driver arrives for pickup, the light strip glows in the selected color. Conversely, riders can hold up their phones to display the matching light strip color to quickly show their drivers where they are.Uber, repeatedly plagued by customer complaints about surge pricing and drivers’ bad behavior, frames SPOT as its latest “experiment” in its “ongoing effort to make Uber pickups as seamless as possible.” But is it bright enough to shine some positive light on the controversial company?   Related: Court Denies Uber’s Request to Appeal Class-Action Status of U.S. Driver Lawsuitlast_img read more