SA, Turkey: room for increased trade

first_img21 November 2012 South Africa and Turkey should renew their efforts to increase trade following a drop in commercial activity between the two countries, says Trade and Industry Deputy Minister Elizabeth Thabethe. “Trade between South Africa and Turkey decreased from R10.6-billion in 2008 to R5.1-billion in 2009 and further to R4.9-billion in 2010 mainly due to the global economic crisis,” Thabethe told a business seminar in Istanbul on Tuesday. Thabethe is in Turkey on a four-day outward selling and investment mission, accompanied by a business delegation made up of representatives from South Africa’s energy, mining, jewellery, infrastructure, clothing and information and communication technology sectors. The deputy minister said that in spite of the prevailing global economic climate, the two countries should think outside the box to reverse the trend. “I am hoping that the businesspeople from Turkey and South Africa that are here today will work together to ensure that this trend is not only arrested, but it is actually reversed by taking advantage of the myriad trade and investment opportunities available in both countries.” The two countries had similar characteristics, with an advantage in terms of their location, the minister said.l “South Africa is located as the gateway to the African Continent, with Turkey in the Middle East neighbouring various European Union states. This is one advantage that should be used maximally by our businesspeople. “Surely, there is certainly greater room to grow the volume of a two-way trade and investment between South Africa and Turkey.” Turkish Deputy Minister of Economy Mustafa Sever said South Africa was one of the world’s success stories and was brimming with opportunities that Turkish businesspeople could explore in partnership with their South African counterparts. During the South Africa-Turkey Business Forum held in South Africa in October, Economic Development Minister Ebrahim Patel said the two countries played pivotal roles in the development trajectory of the globe. “The two powerful nations that are critical to the development of the world should be trading more with each other and should be investing more in each other,” Patel said. South Africa and Turkey are both members of the G20. Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

Conditions holding steady in late July Between the Rows

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Lamar Liming – Trumbull/ Mahoning CountyWe probably had about 4 inches last week and we are too wet again. We got the heat too. It was terrible. North of me about 25 miles they got 6 inches of rain around Kinsman in northern Trumbull County Saturday morning. It washed roads out. It was unbelievable.Today is nice, about 65 degrees here now, but by the end of the week it is supposed to be right back up to 88 here. The humidity is just terrible. I’m surprised how the cows kept going really. It dinged production some but not like I thought. I don’t know how they hung in like they did in that heat.We got some straw made. Wheat straw quality was good. We got the second crop hay made too. The second cutting was not anything special, about average. It was definitely better than the first cutting but the yield was not there. Tons were below normal. I think it will take another year to get those tons back and get this hay crop going. We dried out there and that helped, but the ground is getting wet again.We have not seen disease issues yet. I have never sprayed fungicides. The last few years I have been hearing about some fungicides sprayed around here.The corn silage is still a long ways off. We are just starting to see some tasseling. If we get more extreme heat it will speed the process up for the silage though. I can’t believe how bad these fields looked at the end of June and how much better they are now. They really evened out, but are still uneven across the board.Weed control has been alright so far, but I haven’t sprayed my later planted beans yet. The corn has excellent weed control. Hopefully we can get those later beans sprayed this week or we will have some problems with weed pressure.Nathan Brown — Highland CountyThe heat has brought things on. It is looking a lot better. We got all of our beans post- sprayed. We are getting ready to start on some fungicide applications on soybeans tomorrow. Probably the first part of next week we will be looking at fungicides on corn too. Crop development has really progressed with the heat we’ve had the last week. Several of our first-planted corn fields are starting to tassel right now. We were not in full tassel during the heat so I hope going into the cooler weather this week will be good for pollination for this corn crop. Late last week we had over an inch of rain and we had about a half-inch last night so things are looking pretty decent moisture wise for right now.On the wheat ground we are waiting for the weeds to green up and we’ll do a burndown today. We are then hoping to plant the cover crops on that ground this week. We are hoping to do some soil health building this year to prepare for next year’s corn crop.The corn is maturing but it is still very uneven. The soybeans are thin and there is still a lot of uncertainty about what this crop will make. The markets do not seem to be reflecting how poor this crop is around the countryside and guys are still nervous about how this will play out.We are definitely seeing some frogeye in the soybeans with these warm temperatures. I looked out last week and saw a little southern rust in the corn. We are seeing some gray leaf spot and northern corn leaf blight in places too. With the year we’ve had, every disease imaginable could be out there in these fields. We have some frogeye resistant varieties so we may not spray all of our soybean acres. We are going to spray our early maturities that are more susceptible. The corn is variety specific, but with the year we’ve had I think we’ll spray the majority of our corn acres with fungicide too.Andrew Armstrong — Clark CountyEverything is progressing in a positive direction. We got some rain yesterday and we got the heat and humidity. The corn is loving it and we are finally seeing beans taking off.We definitely needed yesterday’s rain. It was one of the first widespread rains that hit every farm of ours. The last couple of weeks we’d had some pop-up showers that came pretty fast and didn’t really soak in, but kept everything going. This last rain was a really good one. It was a couple of showers here and there and it had time to really soak into the ground and do something.We haven’t had too much disease pressure, but we are seeing a tremendous amount of weed pressure in some of our lower river-bottom soybean ground. We have waterhemp rearing its ugly head. We have been over some bean fields at least three times trying to do what we can with different mixtures to try and kill it before it is too bad. It is not out of hand, but we don’t want it to get out of hand so we are spending some extra time to get that taken care of.I’m pretty sure it came in from all of the water we got. Most of the areas are where the rivers and creeks flooded and the seed has come from up river. Most of it is Roundup resistant so we have to try some other things. We are also dealing with some marestail. It looks like we fry them at first. They struggle for a bit and then they come right out of it. We are trying to get those marestail plants taken care of before canopy.We were bushhogging some CRP ground and found a swarm of beetles. At first they looked like stink bugs, but they are not. We checked on the threshold and we are Ok right now but we have been watching the insects too.All of the corn around here is at least shoulder high now. There have been some guys trying to sidedress with hi-boys for some late N and there is a lot of crop dusting going on too.Dylan Baer — Wood CountyWe got our wheat off last week and finished just ahead of a 3-inch rainfall over a couple of days. I ended up being rained out most of the hot days of baling, which I was OK with. We were pretty dry before that rain came and that rain really set us up. The corn has been dark green and growing fast and last night we got another 1.2 inches, which is holding up the baling.It actually did the little bit of crop we have in the field a lot of good. The crops actually look pretty good. If it was the end of June instead of the end of July we’d be right on track for some good crops, but we are still a month behind.The hay was below average quality and amount for the first cutting. There was too much alfalfa missing and too many weeds. People like to buy bales of hay not bales of weeds. Everything is coming back pretty well and I have been selling it. People are buying whatever they can find. I had an ad up online for 24 hours and everything I was selling was gone. So it is worth something. I think the second cutting will be higher quality for sure. Tons might still be down but it does look like the alfalfa is taking over again.The last several years we have been privileged to have some pretty decent yields. We saw 65 to 90 bushels so it is below what we’ve had but we still feel good about that and we were thankful to have it off before sprouting started to set in. We were pretty happy with Prosaro keeping the wheat healthy all the way through.Weed control has been a real battle. The prevented planting acres have nothing growing but weeds. While we were baling we were trying to spray in the morning and bale in the afternoon. Now that the wheat is off we’ll get busy applying manure to wheat ground and planting cover crops on the prevented planting ground. There is no shortage of work around here. Even our bean fields we got planted are not canopied yet and the weed pressure is a real battle now.last_img read more

Legal with Leah: Motor Vehicle Sales Tax

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest There is nothing like the feeling of driving off the dealership lot in a brand new or new to you vehicle. Very few things can take that feeling away, but nothing could take that smile off your face like the tax bill on that car, truck or SUV.On this Legal with Leah, Ty Higgins, Ohio Farm Bureau Director of Media Relations and Leah Curtis, Ohio Farm Bureau policy counsel discuss what the ag sales tax exemption covers and what it doesn’t.Listen to Legal with Leah, a podcast featuring Ohio Farm Bureau’s Policy Counsel Leah Curtis discussing topics impacting farmers and landowners.TranscriptTy Higgins: Leah I know that you and Joe covered that ag does have an exemption on sales tax, but the question then becomes does the tax break apply for motor vehicles and trailer purchases as well. The answer?Leah Curtis: Well generally it doesn’t apply to motor vehicles in particular. So keep in mind that the sales tax exemption is based on the use of the item, not who you are. So a lot of people think of it as the ‘farmer sales tax exemption.’ It’s actually the farm sales tax exemption. So for things like equipment that you are going to use in the actual production of an agricultural product like tractors and planters and combines, those things are clearly exempt from sales tax.Motor vehicles, however, the tax department’s official line is that those are registered for use on the highway. And so they are mainly used for transport not for production. And so they are generally not exempt from sales tax.Ty Higgins:  Are there exceptions to the rule?Leah Curtis: There are a couple exceptions. The one very specific one is if you have basically a spray truck that has a PTO-powered tank and it’s used for things like fertilizer, pesticide, herbicide. That is a vehicle that clearly has only the purpose to be used in production. And so if it is that type of vehicle it is exempt from sales tax. If there is not a PTO though, then the sprayer unit is exempt, the truck is not. And so the dealer would likely separate those two charges out so that there is only sales tax paid on the vehicle portion.Leah Curtis: The other exemption is a pretty obscure one we don’t see it used very often or actually happen very often, but it’s vehicles or trailers that are primarily used to prevent illness to livestock such as for quarantine, transporting sick animals. If that is their sole purpose and that is their only purpose then that could be exempt from sales tax.Now it’s a very difficult test and we don’t normally see people actually able to take advantage of that but there is some precedent for that. There’s also an exemption that’s very specific to eggs. Vehicles that are only used by egg producers to ship eggs from the farm to market under refrigerated conditions, those are specifically not subject to the sales tax.Ty Higgins: Used to be growing up that if we were gonna buy something for the farm, we would just go up the road a piece or two and stay pretty close to our local economy. But now you see sites like Craigslist and Facebook. There are all kinds of marketplace pages on there to to buy things of this nature and a lot of times those sales now will be made across state lines. What does that mean for taxes on on that purchase?Leah Curtis: So if it’s a Craigslist or a Facebook sale, it’s probably going to be treated similar to one inside the state would be where you probably wouldn’t pay sales tax on it. If you are buying from a typical dealer though outside the state and say maybe that state does have a sales tax exemption, once you bring it back into Ohio and you go to title it or license it, it’s very possible the tax department may send you a notice saying, ‘Hey you owe what’s called ‘use tax’ on this vehicle or trailer.’ Use tax is kind of the corollary to sales tax. If you buy it here you pay sales; you buy it someplace else you pay use.So we’ve had some people have that happen. They bought it in Wisconsin and it was exempt they thought so they didn’t pay sales tax, brought it in here they got a note from the tax department that says, ‘Hey we’re aware that you have this trailer that had no tax paid on it. And so now you owe use tax.’ So it’s just something to keep in mind when you are looking outside of state for those kind of new trailers or at a dealership or it’s an official seller that would have a sales or use tax obligation.Ty Higgins: This has been Legal with Leah. That’s Leah Curtis. She’s policy counsel with Ohio Farm Bureau. Thanks for listening. I’m Ty Higgins. We’ll see you down the road.last_img read more

This time, Montalbo plays hero for La Salle vs Ateneo

first_imgKammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa The Bacolod native said atoning for his costly turnover in the first duel was the least of his concerns.“I wasn’t thinking of making up for that (mistake). I just want to play my game and be aggressive,” he said after winging up with six points, three rebounds, and three assists.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“Coach told me to calm down. Eventually, I did,” he said. “Coach called for a play, didn’t see anyone open because they were denying, and I saw the lane and took what the defense gave me.”It also helps that Ayo continues to trust Montalbo and that faith allows the fourth-year guard to play his usual game. “To have a coach like that really means a lot for the confidence level of one player. If you’re open, you can take the shot. If you’re free take it. Whoever deserves to be on the court will play. Even if I’m on the bench or on the court, I’ll do my best,” he said.La Salle heads to the Final Four with a twice-to-beat advantage against No. 4 Adamson and Montalbo said the team is right where it wants to be.“We’re really confident. Hopefully, we’ll peak on time. It ain’t over until it’s over and we won’t stop until we get that crown,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Archers, Eagles favorites to win UAAP Season 80 PLAY LIST 02:36Archers, Eagles favorites to win UAAP Season 8000:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. No sweep: La Salle takes down top seed Ateneo Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Kib Montalbo. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netLast time La Salle and Ateneo met, Kib Montalbo lost the ball on the inbounds play which led to the Blue Eagles taking a 76-75 victory in the first round.On Sunday, Montalbo was the hero after drilling the go-ahead floater with 40.3 seconds left in the Green Archers’ 79-76 win abd deal the Blue Eagles their first defeat of UAAP Season 80.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 LATEST STORIES CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Read Next QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillionlast_img read more

2017 NYC September Hardwrap

first_imgView your copy of the 2017 September Hardwrap Magazine now!The Hard Wrap Magazine is published by Touch Football Australia on a bi-annual basis and is devoted to the events and news that have been making headlines.Catch up on the latest news and information in the touch world from the past six months.  Check out our Around the Grounds segment, teams lists, Masters Trans Tasman team previews and much more!Hardwrap E-Zine versionlast_img

Get more out of your nonprofit’s Facebook page

first_imgJohn Haydon, our favorite Facebook guru, has created a useful video tutorial on how to use the new Facebook Insights reports to understand how your nonprofit’s Facebook outreach is faring. If you’re not regularly tracking your results on Facebook, you’re missing out on a real opportunity to better understand your social media audience and optimize how you interact with your supporters. Facebook Insights can tell you:Which posts have the highest levels of engagementWhen people liked — and “unliked” — your pageWhich sites refer the most traffic to your Facebook pageCheck out John’s tutorial on the new Facebook Insights reports, then let us know if you’ve seen the new Insights options and how your Facebook outreach is doing.last_img

10 ways to thank your donors

first_imgImage credit: flickr member nateOneAfter the busy nonprofit year-end giving season comes the often overlooked nonprofit thank you season. Remember to give thanks for donations early and often. Showing constant, authentic appreciation for your donors (new and old) is crucial for retaining supporters.Need to breathe some new life into your donor gratitude plan? Here are ten thank you ideas to inspire you in the new year.1. Always send a thank you (and tax deductible information) within 48 hours of receiving a donation. Many online giving tools such as DonateNow automatically generate a donor receipt, but be sure to tailor or add a thank you message to the receipt. Then, follow up with a more personalized2. Send a birthday card to donors and remind them that they are important to the work your organization accomplishes.3. Have your board members personally call donors to say thanks. I recently did this as a board member for my alma mater’s alumni association. Out of the 25 people I called, only one person had received a thank you phone call from an organization before.4. Ask those who directly benefit from donations to write a handwritten note of thanks. Animal organizations could try letting their clients express their thanks to donors with a special piece of artwork.5. Create a YouTube video to thank donors when you reach a campaign goal. A great example of this are charity: water’s 5th birthday thank you videos.6. Have some exciting news to share? Send a special announcement to donors with images and a big bold note to thank them for making the accomplishment possible.7. Invite donors to a thank you reception. You’ll not only show your appreciation, but you’ll get face time with your donors and have the opportunity to learn more about why they support your organization.8. Many organizations send thank you cards and year-end appeals during the November/December holiday season. Don’t overlook other holidays as occasions to express your love and thanks.9. Dedicate social media shout outs to thank and recognize donors.10. Send donors a top ten list of accomplishments for the year to demonstrate how donations make an impact (and then make it clear that without their support, you wouldn’t have a top ten list).Donors are your organization’s superheroes. Saying thanks and reminding them of their VIP status should be at the top of your to do list in 2014. What are your favorite ways to thank donors? Share your ideas in the comments.last_img read more

Top 6 donor communication mistakes to avoid

first_img2. The “Me Me Me”Some causes suffer from nonprofit narcissism. They mean well, but their messages are devoid of one key ingredient: the donor. People who support your work also want to feel like part of your team.How to avoid: Instead of talking only about the work you’re doing, reframe your communications to underscore how the donor is making your work possible. Use the word “you” more than “we”, and highlight the work of individual donors and volunteers to bring these stories to life. According to the Association of Fundraising Professionals’ Fundraising Effectiveness Survey Report, 105% of donors gained by nonprofits were offset by lapsed donors. Let that sink in for a minute: for every 100 new donors that came through the door, 105 walked out. Not exactly the growth most nonprofits are looking for.One of the best ways to improve your donor churn rate is to improve your donor communications.Here are six of the worst donor communication mistakes, and some tips for how to avoid them:1. The “One and Done”Sadly for some donors, the only “communication” they receive from the nonprofits they support is a donation receipt. Others may receive a nice thank you letter, but not much else.How to avoid: Plan a series of ongoing communications with your donors. In addition to your nonprofit newsletter, provide quarterly updates for donors on the impact of their gifts, and show what goes on behind the scenes to make it happen. Create an editorial calendar and include your donor outreach as one key component to track. 3. The “Broken Record”All too often, I see organizations sharing the same updates over and over. This is great … if you want to bore your donors. Unless you’re sharing success story after success story, your donors may wonder if you’re doing anything new or making any progress.How to avoid: This is another way an editorial calendar can help you improve your donor communications. Create a list of stories, events, announcements, and seasonal topics that are relevant to your cause—and your donors—then, plot them out on your calendar to incorporate variety in your newsletters, impact updates, and social media outreach. Stuck for ideas? Ask your donors, volunteers, and beneficiaries for their input. They have a different perspective than you and probably have some fresh suggestions. Another option: tap your board to share a short update or quote for you to use in your next message. 4. The “Word Vomit”Are you guilty of sharing too much information? When it comes to your donor outreach, is “verbose” an understatement? If your messages feel like solid walls of text, your supporters are less likely to bother reading them—and may feel like you don’t respect their time.How to avoid: In most cases, people scan more than they read. This means that short, skimmable text works best, especially online. Use a “tease and link” strategy in your emails if you have longer stories to share. To make your messages even more readable, cut any acronyms, jargon, or insider language that will leave donors scratching their heads.center_img 6. The “Show Me the Money”You know that relative who never calls—except when he needs something from you? Don’t be that guy. When donors only hear from you when you have an appeal, they may start to wonder what happened to the money they already gave you.How to avoid: Implement a “share vs. ask ratio” in your organization’s communication. Plan to send a certain number of cultivation or update messages for every time you send an appeal.(For more donor stewardship ideas, try our checklist.)‘Fess up: are you guilty of any of these mistakes? What would you add to the list? Which communication missteps bug you the most? Share your thoughts in the comments below. 5. The “Disconnected”Do you ever feel like you’re talking, but no one seems to be listening? Most often, this is because you’re not communicating in a way that reflects what your donor wants to hear. This often happens when organizations aren’t in sync with why their donors give.How to avoid: Talk to your donors to understand why they care about your issue and what prompted them to give. Ask for feedback on your communications and let your donors have a say in how they hear from you. Try segmenting your donors by how they came to your organization, their level of giving, or by the specific programs they support. Then, communicate with them based on these parameters to make your message more relevant.last_img read more