How do Raiders feel about roughing the passer controversy?: ‘It’s just a shame’

first_imgALAMEDA — Mo Hurst doesn’t remember the last time he helped a quarterback up after taking him to the ground.Against the Dolphins last Sunday, after tackling Ryan Tannehill on 3rd-and-9 around Oakland’s 45-yard line, Hurst extended his right hand for Tannehill before even fully standing himself.“I really didn’t think I was going to get called,” Hurst said Thursday. “If I help him up maybe they’ll be like, ‘Aw, he’s being nice to him. He’s not really trying to do anything bad.’”The ref threw a …last_img

A fairy tale come true

first_imgSpeech by former president FW de Klerk on 8 September 2010, Pestana Chelsea bridge hotel, london.“The legacy of the first African world cup – let’s make sure it’s just the beginning”.Six years ago the Fairy Godmother – in the guise of Sepp Blatter – waved a magic wand, and announced that South Africa had been chosen to host the 2010 FIFA World Cup. For the first time in history, Africa – the Cinderella continent – had been chosen to host the world’s premier sporting event.Mind you, had it not been for a little legerdemain and the mysterious voting of the FIFA representative from Oceana, South Africa – and not Germany – would have hosted the preceding World Cup in 2006. President Nelson Mandela who had attended the announcement in 1999 with great expectations, remarked laconically “Ah well… there evidently were some aspects of the end game that we South Africans did not fully understand.”So, in the 2004 announcement, it was Africa’s turn. Sepp Blatter had all but promised that no more ugly first-world stepsisters would be permitted to jump the queue.From that moment the countdown started.Would South Africa be able to make the grade?Would an African country actually be able to deliver a top class world event?Would we be able to turn our third world pumpkins and mice into of the glittering stadiums, airports and infrastructure that the event would require?The world was skeptical. We heard again the old familiar choruses that precede all major global sporting events, wherever they are held: The stadiums would not be ready; security was inadequate; the infra-structure of airports, railways and roads would simply not be able to cope.The skepticism continued right until the eve of the event. In May this year YouGovStone, on behalf of SABMiller, carried out research among its network of influential people to establish their views on the coming event. The results were, to say the very least, discouraging:Only 29% of those polled thought that the World Cup in South Africa would be a great success;58% expected that there would be problems with security;57% thought that there would be transport and logistics problems; and59% thought that the average South African would not benefit from the event.Most South Africans, on the other hand, had little doubt about our ability to hold a successful World Cup. After all, we had already hosted very successful Rugby and Cricket World Cups in 1995 and 2003. In 2009 – at the drop of a hat – we had been able to step into the breach and host India’s wildly popular 20/20 Cricket Competition after the security situation in India had made it necessary to move the event.The fact is that one of South Africa’s strengths is its ability to manage large projects. We have excellent – and highly competitive – civil engineering companies that successfully participate in and manage large projects all over the world.If anything, South Africans were a little too optimistic. One of our leading real estate companies provided advice to home owners on how they could convert their homes into B&Bs and make fortunes during the four weeks of the World Cup. As a result, hundreds of expectant homeowners built luxury guest suites and waited forlornly for bookings that never came. Small entrepreneurs seriously overestimated the number of visitors who would come to South Africa for the event.Restaurateurs geared up for a bumper season – but most were deeply disappointed: not only did international crowds not descend on their eateries, their regular South African customers also stayed away in droves because for a whole month they were glued to their TV screens watching soccer!Despite all this, Danny Jordaan, the Chairman of the local organizing committee, and his team made steady progress.Magnificent new stadiums were built – and old ones were renovated and refurbished.New highways and rapid transit systems were constructed.South Africa’s major airports were vastly expanded and modernized. After years of being cocooned in hoardings and scaffolds, Cape Town’s new international airport emerged just before the World Cup like a gigantic crystal butterfly.In our major cities large clocks counted down the days to the opening match on 11 June.Our leading companies jumped onto the bandwagon and helped to sweep up national support. Government, opposition, religious and civil society leaders embraced one another and exhorted the nation to make a success of the event. Unprecedented security arrangements were made and special courts were established to dispense swift justice to law-breakers.In the process, South Africans also learned that the FIFA fairy godmother was not motivated solely by altruism. She made it clear that she – and she alone – would choose Cinderella’s ball gown and accessories. Apparently unconcerned about any practical implications, Sepp Blatter insisted that the Cape Town Stadium should be built in Green Point – because he thought it would look pretty with Table Mountain as its backdrop. The City would rather have upgraded the existing Newlands Stadium – or built a new stadium at Culembourg, close to existing rail and road routes. However, FIFA was adamant that it would either be Green Point – or there would be no games in Cape Town at all.Most of the accessories – including the flags, vuvuzelas and even Zumi, the World Cup mascot, were manufactured in Asia. Companies that were not official FIFA sponsors were prohibited from displaying their wares or advertising anywhere near the games. Our stadiums were suddenly flooded with American Budweiser beer – a virtually unknown product – and our own excellent Castle Lager was nowhere in sight.Nevertheless, it worked.For a glorious month South Africans laid down the burden of our divided history and joined one another in a magnificent national festival.The noise of our divisive national debate – of the Julius Malemas and right wing extremists – was drowned out by the discordant but joyous blare of the Vuvuzela.The only colours that were important were the colours of the South African flag. Hundreds of thousands of South Africans festooned their cars, taxis and trucks with the national flag.Enterprising university students developed and marketed socks, emblazoned with the flags of participating nations, that fitted snuggly over car wing mirrors.We celebrated wildly when, against all expectations, Bafana Bafana drew against Mexico. We commiserated with one another when we lost to Uruguay and had to exit the competition. Nevertheless, despite our 83rd ranking we did quite well and performed better than many other countries – including France – that were much higher up the international ladder.Once we had been knocked out, South Africans switched their allegiance whole-heartedly and without reservation to Africa’s best remaining hope, Ghana. Black South Africans were surprised that nearly all whites identified with Africa – with Baghana, Baghana – rather than with England or some other European country.When Ghana sadly – and unluckily – left the fray, many black South Africans returned the compliment and supported Holland, because of its historic ties to many of their white compatriots. Such were the times and such was the spirit that animated our people for that magic month in the depth of the southern winter.But as with all fairy tales the clock struck twelve.Cinderella had to scurry down the palace steps, and confront again the harsh realities of our national life. The party was over. The bunting was removed. Our national attention shifted from the empty stadiums to the continuing poverty and inequality in which too many South Africans continue to live. The vuvuzelas were silent. Strident voices again began to dominate the national discourse.Nevertheless, during those four weeks we had successfully changed international perceptions of our country. It was clear from another survey carried out by YouGovStone on behalf of SABMiller in August 2010 that there had been a major and positive shift in attitudes toward South Africa. The survey revealed thatfully 72% believed that the World Cup would have a very positive or positive legacy for South Africa – compared to only the 29% of those polled before the event, who had thought it would be a success.54% thought that it would bring great benefits to South Africa.61% said that, as a result of the success of the World Cup, they thought that South Africa would be a good place to hold global events of all kinds.42% felt more positive about visiting South Africa as a tourist.Unfortunately, since then we South Africans have been attracting attention for all the wrong reasons. On the soccer field of international opinion we have been resolutely scoring one own goal after another.First came the Protection of Information Bill that would give government broad powers to classify virtually any information regarding its activities in the “national interest”. The effect would be to stop whistle-blowers and investigative journalists from trying to obtain and publish information on government corruption and inefficiency.Then came ANC proposals for the establishment of a Media Appeals Tribunal that would ensure “responsible” and “balanced” reporting by the press and that would lay down stiff penalties – including prison sentences – for recalcitrant journalists.This was followed by reports of a new system of land ownership which would cap the rights of South Africans to own freehold property and that would require all new foreign landowners to have local South African partners.During the past few weeks we have witnessed a protracted strike by relatively well-paid civil servants who are demanding salary increases twice the current rate of inflation. All this threatens to send the government deficit over 7% of GDP.Alas, the silly season continues. Julius Malema continues to bellow about the nationalization of the mines. President Zuma and the ANC – with a weather eye on international credit ratings – continue to insist that this is not their policy. The increasingly divergent factions within the ANC Alliance continue to circle one another, hurling insults, before the ANC’s important National General Council later this month.The situation is back to normal.Cinderella is back in the kitchen, sitting on the ash-heap. The FIFA fairy godmother has flown off to her next assignment in Brazil – weighed down by almost two hundred million dollars in profits. The Afro-pessimists have returned in strength, confident that South Africa’s World Cup success was just a flash in the pan.However, we South Africans have always been much more realistic than that.We did not expect that the World Cup would change the underlying realities of South Africa – and it did not.It did not have much impact on poverty and inequality.It did not resolve the issues of race and class that have dominated our national discourse for hundreds of years.It did not bring the scourges of AIDS and crime to an end.Anyone who expected such outcomes would really have to believe in fairy tales.However, by the same token, all these developments have not seriously undermined the strengths that made the World Cup success possible.We South Africans are remarkably resilient and have a wonderful ability to confound the pessimists. Most foreigners who have visited our shores since 1652 have confidently predicted that the country could not possibly work. But we have proved them wrong.Nobody in 1985 thought that we ourselves would be able to end apartheid and find a peaceful solution to the spiraling conflict in our society. Yet we did.After 1994 Afro-pessimists doubted that a black ANC government would possibly be able to run a sophisticated economy. But for sixteen years it has done so – and achieved uninterrupted economic growth for thirteen of those years until bankers in the northern hemisphere upset the global economic apple cart.I am confident that we will once again prove the pessimists wrong.I do not believe for a moment that the ANC will be successful with its current assault on the media. The Protection of Information Bill will be withdrawn or satisfactorily amended; and the Media Appeals Tribunal will be shelved.The current proposals relating to land tenure will wither in the light of national and international economic scrutiny. Our farmers, together with government, will hammer out a workable approach to land reform.The ANC will successfully resolve the divisions within its Alliance. Or even better, it will split and open the way to national politics based on social and economic policies rather than on race.And South Africa will retain the Rugby World Cup next year. Just you wait and see!The glorious weeks of the FIFA World Cup are receding further and further into our collective memory – but some things will remain,Including our ability to compete with the best in the world;Including the world-class infrastructure that was created for the event; andIncluding the natural beauty and the warmth and hospitality of our people that the World Cup has introduced to hundreds of millions of potential tourists.As we all know, Cinderella, in her headlong flight down the palace steps, left something of her magic behind in the form of the crystal slipper that was retrieved by Prince Charming. The FIFA World Cup left us with a similar magic legacy: it is the shining vision of the brilliant, multifaceted nation we can and will become.This, I believe, is the main legacy of the World Cup: it has shown us the nation that we can become if we all unite behind a worthy vision and work together in the spirit of June/July 2010.last_img read more

Olympics ‘phenomenal, humbling’: Oscar

first_img11 August 2012 South Africa’s men’s 4 by 400 metres relay team failed to challenge for a medal at the London Olympic Games on Friday evening as the Bahamas ran a national record in staging a come-from-behind victory over the USA. The islanders won gold in 2:56.72, with the USA second in 2:57.05 and Trinidad and Tobago in third, over two seconds further back. South Africa, the silver medal winners at last year’s IAAF World Championship in Daegu, South Korea, never challenged and finished in eighth place in the nine-team field, with Cuba failing to finish.Season’s best time Nonetheless, the quartet of Shaun de Jager, LJ van Zyl, Willem de Beer and Oscar Pistorius ran a season’s best 3:03.46. It was, however, more than four seconds slower than their effort in Daegu. South Africa had reached the final after an appeal was upheld for a Kenyan runner tripping up Ofentse Mogawane in the semi-finals, resulting in the South Africans being given lane one for Friday evening’s relay. Mogawane could not run on Friday night after suffering a dislocated shoulder in the semi-finals. His replacement, 400 metres hurdler LJ van Zyl, nearly didn’t make it to the final either. “I was actually on my way to the airport,” he told reporters after the race. “Then I got the call from Hezekiel [Sepeng], our team leader, [saying] that I have to come back.”Roller-coaster journey Pistorius said it had been a roller-coaster journey for the team. “So many mixed emotions yesterday, to be honest,” he said. “We got back to the warm up track to cool down and we heard that Kenya had been disqualified and there were grounds for us to put in a protest, so team management went through with that and we found out last night that we would have the chance to run in the ninth lane today,” Pistorius said. “We didn’t want to run if we were going to take another team out, but there was an extra lane here and they gave us that lane because we were in second position at the World Championships last year. “We got reinstated and LJ van Zyl was on his way to the airport and he got called back to come and run. “So, just a mix of emotions, and I’d like to thank Ofentse [Mogawane],” Pistorius said. “He’s not here with us and he is making a quick recovery, but he was as much part of our team [as anyone else]. ‘This whole experience has been phenomenal’ “This whole experience has been phenomenal for us. To step out here for an Olympic final is more than I could ever hope for, and it was a truly humbling experience.” Commenting on running the final leg, Pistorius said: “I think running the anchor leg for me was kind of stressful. I’m never usually given that much responsibility, but representing my country and knowing that I have to bring home the baton really made me run a little bit harder. “I think I had a lot of work to do to catch up, but I ran a good back straight and second corner. Then, coming into the home straight, there was just a little too much work [to do]. “I’m very proud of my team,” Pistorius said. “They did a phenomenal job with what we had. That opportunity to come out here and finish like today and not like yesterday was a dream come true.” Talking about the Olympic experience, Pistorius added: “Every athlete out here trains as hard as they possibly can for four years. They sacrifice a lot. “For me to come out here and know that all the hard work I’ve put in, and all the time and effort so many people have given me and they’ve invested in me has paid off, has been one of the most amazing experiences of my life, and I’ve got so many people to thank for that. “It inspires me and motivates me for the next four years, looking to Rio.”Eyes now on Semenya, Stander South Africa’s hopes of adding to the country’s three gold medals, one silver medal and a bronze medal will rest on the shoulders of Caster Semenya on Saturday evening. She contests the final of the 800 metres at nine o’clock, having run the fastest time of the semi-finals, stopping the clock in 1:57.67. On Sunday, Burry Stander, ranked fourth in the world in cross-country mountain biking, has a shot at a medal. A medal for either athlete would make the London 2012 Olympic Games the most successful Olympics for South Africa since the country was readmitted to the Olympic fold in 1992. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Ohio Crop Tour Recap I-75 Leg | Day 2

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Matt and the team from the West leg of the Ohio Crop Tour have an update from the southern portion of their leg. The Ohio Crop Tour is brought to you by AgroLiquid.last_img

There Is Something Worse Than Being Labeled Unresponsive

first_img Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now On average, a human being lives around 4,160 weeks. No one’s death bed regret will be: “I wish I’d have had time to get to inbox zero . . . oh, and someone clear my text messages for me when I am gone.” This article suggests that there is “nothing worse than being labeled unresponsive,” a suggestion that proves false on its face, as there are a lot worse things one’s peers might label them. The article also offers rules for responsiveness, getting them exactly backwards.For starters, how about “completely unproductive” as something worse than unresponsive. Or, let’s try “distracted beyond belief.” You might want to avoid “lacks focus,” or “I have never seen their face in a meeting because they live in their inbox.”Can you imagine anything worse than working on low-value transactional communications over the crucial outcomes you are responsible for generating? Can you imagine asking someone to trade their highest priorities and critical outcomes to respond to a message based on nothing more than an arbitrary set of rules driven by technologies? That would be worse and by the largest of margins.The High Price of Technological CommunicationsWith no cost to the sender, one is allowed to send a message to another person, imposing a responsibility on the receiver to open the message, read it, determine what it means, decide what needs to done, decide when they have time to honor the request, and respond accordingly. One message is not a problem, but it’s impossible to underestimate the burden created by 180 notes or more, spread across different inboxes.Every message you send creates a burden on the person receiving it, and every message you receive creates the same responsibility for you. Which means, the content should be worthy of the burden, and we should spend more time determining the right medium for the message we are sending.The tools we use have eliminated the barriers of time and space. Let me say this another way. For all the tools provide us, they also eliminate our time, and they eliminate our space, which you might think of as “margin,” the space to stop and think and do cognitive work.A Better Set of Rules for ResponsivenessThe onslaught of technologies and the proliferation of inboxes (email, text message, Slack, Google Chat, LinkedIn, Facebook, and voicemail) increases the number of messages one must process, as well as the increasing volume through each of these channels.The rules for responsiveness cannot be determined by the available technology, which continues to increase both the ease and the speed in which one can communicate. The idea that a text should “probably” be answered in an hour and email in twenty-four hours is a perfect example of what is wrong with this line of thought. These “rules” are completely devoid of context. I respond to “Hi Dad!” faster than any other text messages. I hope you respond to “Hi Mom” equally as fast.We all have obligations to the people in our lives. However, we also have obligations to ourselves, our purpose and meaning, and our priorities and responsibilities, one of which is the things we need to do for other people—but not the only one.When you are processing the messages from some people, you have decided not to work on the more valuable work that creates even greater value for another set of people—people with whom you are also obligated.Better rules might be to respond based on the context of the message.Is it a communication about something important and strategic to you or the other party?Is it time sensitive and will something be lost if your response isn’t immediate?Is it a routine communication that costs you or the sender nothing even if it takes a few days to respond?Does the message require a response?There are better ways to think about your obligations to other people. One of those might include assuming good intentions of others, recognizing that we are all doing more with less, and more importantly, that time is a finite, non-renewable resource. Instead of believing them to be unresponsive, you might assume they are busy doing meaningful work and that they are trying their best to make good decisions about the choices they make.last_img read more

CHRISTMAS TREE SALES SUPPORT MORNINGSIDE BOY SCOUT TROOP

first_imgIf you are still looking to purchase a Christmas tree for the holiday season, you can find one downtown and help out some local Boy Scouts at the same time.Darby Young is committee chairman for the 13 member Scout Troop 225, sponsored by Nativity Parish.He says each member volunteers during the annual Christmas tree sale to raise money for summer camp activities:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/SCOUTS.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC………in Minnesota. :15Young says the scouts learn a solid work ethic by working with their hands and learn good communication skills while sales pitching to the customers.The troop has been doing the fundraiser for many years and the trees they don’t sell go to another local organization:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/SCOUTS2.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC………..on the trail. ;19Many community members who have purchased a tree during previous years receive a postcard reminder of the tree sales:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/SCOUTS3.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC……..coupon as well. :13The scouts are located downtown in the parking lots of Walgreens and Ashley Furniture between Nebraska and Pierce Streets across from the Long Lines Family Rec Center.The lot is open Monday through Friday from 5 -8 pm, Saturday 9am – 8pm and Sunday 11am-8pm.last_img read more

Stranger Things 3 reviews are out Best season by leaps and bounds

first_img TV and Movies i really loved new #StrangerThings but i’m most excited for everyone to see it and fall madly in love with maya hawke, who is just wonderful. she stole the season for me. pic.twitter.com/66UajQQ1yo— lindsey romain (@lindseyromain) July 1, 2019 So there’s not much more I can say, but I was so impressed with the way specific ships sailed & laughed out loud at least once per episode (mostly at DAD Hopper). Also a shopping scene 🥰 #strangerthings— Emily Longeretta (@emilylongeretta) June 30, 2019 1 Stranger Things is looking good. Netflix Things are about to get Strange. The third season of Netflix’s hit series Stranger Things arrives on July 4, and while it may be a stressful summer in Hawkins, Indiana, it’s looking like a great one for fans. The embargo for reviews lifted on Sunday, and critics shared their opinions.  Now playing: Watch this: I think I can finally tell you that #StrangerThings is the show’s best season yet. It’s not perfect (more on that later) but there are moments that are so good, so funny, so deeply heartfelt that it will leave you breathless. It’s also spectacularly gross and I loved it.— Crystal Bell (@crystalbell) June 30, 2019 We know from the recent final trailer that Billy (Dacre Montgomery) could be the target of some Upside Down evil this season. But apparently he’s also a great character this year. “Billy f****** owns,” Colburn writes. Look at this baller piece of clothing pic.twitter.com/bbwhkjQLTI— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 Now that I’ve seen some of #StrangerThings I am not only hit with a huge powerful wave of nostalgia (I was 9 in 1985) I am seriously wondering if we’ll see the absolute worst 80s fashion come back in style. Again.— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 i’ve watched #StrangerThings twice now and i think people who already hate it will find even more to hate but i truly believe the show transcends its inelegant ’80s pop culture flirtations with top-notch character work and archetypal subversion. billy fucking owns.— Randall Colburn (@randallcolburn) June 30, 2019 See all the Stranger Things season 3 photos And CNET sister site ComicBook.com says the 1980s references are just too much. “It’s entertaining to see beloved characters embracing the spirit of goofy ’80s films, but these homages feel so blatant that it feels more like a parody than a tribute,” the ComicBook review reads.Character critiquesThere will be plenty of familiar faces and a few new ones in Hawkins this season. Who stands out? She’s not alone in calling this season the best so far. Randall Colburn, internet culture editor for The AV Club, calls season 3 the show’s “best season by leaps and bounds.” Stranger Things 3 a brilliant return to form Share your voice To Lindsey Romain of Nerdist, the standout is 20-year-old Maya Hawke (yes, real-life daughter of Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman), who plays new character Robin, who apparently works with Steve at Scoops Ahoy, the ice-cream shop in Starcourt Mall. “She stole the season for me,” Romain writes. it’s the best season by leaps and bounds— Randall Colburn (@randallcolburn) June 30, 2019center_img It’s what fans wanted to hear. CNET’s own Jennifer Bisset calls season 3 “a brilliant return to form,” adding that it brings the focus back to the elements that made the first season such an unexpected hit. “This season’s sense of fun, along with its relationship drama and multiple odd pair-ups bring humor and touching moments that recall Game of Thrones at its best,” she writes.MTVNews culture director Crystal Bell tweeted, “I think I can finally tell you that #StrangerThings is the show’s best season yet.” Wrote about the new season of #StrangerThings, which is basically a love letter to old-school tech, shopping malls &, of course, dope retro fits & wild haircuts. The Duffer Brothers did it again: best season yet. (Fret not, didn’t spoil the sauce for you.) https://t.co/pBJ9lcm78S— Edgar Alvarez (@abcdedgar) June 30, 2019 And Police Chief Jim Hopper brings the laughs, according to Emily Longeretta of Us Weekly, who says she “laughed out loud at least once per episode (mostly at DAD Hopper).” Some of the humor in #StrangerThings this season is very broad – too broad, especially early on. On the other hand, this felt like the goriest season yet, which, of course, I was very happy about. I had a couple “oh, I probably shouldn’t be eating right now” moments. Yay, gore!— Eric Goldman (@TheEricGoldman) July 1, 2019 Comment Tags Back to the futureIf you’re a 1980s nostalgic, get ready for an awesome and totally tubular summer, as numerous critics say the show’s 1980s references are back. Edgar Alvarez of Engadget not only proclaims this the “best season yet,” but declares the new season is “basically a love letter to old-school tech, shopping malls &, of course, dope retro fits & wild haircuts.”But not everyone is ready for those faddish fashions to return. For reference, I was a huge supporter of jams shorts. Internet picture for reference. pic.twitter.com/Fb2eRCEP6V— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 Stranger Things season 3: Everything to know Originally published July 1, 12:36 a.m. PT. Update, 9:25 a.m. PT: Adds more reviews.  And at press time, the third season had a 92 percent Certified Fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and a Metascore of 71, indicating “generally favorable reviews,” on CNET sister site Metacritic.Stranger Things season 3 will be available on Netflix on July 4. 59 Photos Gross-out gangAnd in case you forgot this show has a horror theme, Eric Goldman of getFandom is there to remind you. “This felt like the goriest season yet,” he writes, “I had a couple ‘oh, I probably shouldn’t be eating right now’ moments. Yay, gore! 2:33 Our season 3 review Netflixlast_img read more

Trump hails ties with UK despite Brexit criticism

first_imgUS president Donald Trump walks with Britain`s prime minister Theresa May prior to a joint press conference at Chequers, near Aylesbury, Britain on 13 July 2018.Photo: ReutersUS president Donald Trump on Friday played down his extraordinary attack on Britain’s plans for Brexit, praising prime minister Theresa May and insisting bilateral relations “have never been stronger”, even as tens of thousands protested in London against his visit.Trump’s first official trip to Britain was overshadowed by his warning that May’s plans for close ties with the European Union would “kill” a future US trade deal, echoing concerns among eurosceptics in her Conservative party.Meanwhile, in Washington, DC, a US grand jury on Friday indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers for interfering in the November 2016 presidential election, following charges from Special Counsel Robert Mueller.The indictments came just three days before Trump is scheduled to meet with Russia’s Vladimir Putin in Helsinki.As Trump arrived in Scotland later Friday, however, the White House confirmed that the Helsinki meeting would go ahead.”It’s on,” White House spokesperson Sarah Sanders said.Trump later travelled to one of his Scottish golf courses, Turnberry.Following talks at May’s country retreat of Chequers, Trump suggested he might have been hasty in his comments over her negotiating strategy for leaving the EU.”Whatever you do is okay with us, just make sure we can trade together, that’s all that matters,” he told May at a press conference in the grounds of the 16th-century manor house, miles away from the colourful crowds denouncing his own domestic policies.”The United States looks forward to finalising a great bilateral trade deal,” he said, and repeatedly praised May’s leadership, saying she was a “terrific woman”.Trump endorses May rival Just hours earlier, The Sun tabloid published a bombshell interview with the president in which he suggested the prime minister’s Brexit proposal was not what voters wanted.He said he had advised her to take another path, adding that Boris Johnson, who quit as foreign minister this week in protest at the plan, would make “a great prime minister”.Trump denied that he had criticised May, suggesting there was an element of “fake news” in the report — even though The Sun released audio recordings of his remarks.His interview drew outrage among British politicians, who accused him of being “determined to insult” May after 18 months of testy relations between the pair.It also fired up demonstrations in London, where organisers estimated upwards of 250,000 people took to the streets.Chanting “No Trump, no KKK, no fascist USA!”, they flew a huge balloon of the president depicted as a crying baby outside the Houses of Parliament.Even Londoners who did not join the protest, only stopping to take in the mass of people, placards and sloganeering, seemed supportive of the demonstrations.”He brings it on himself — it’s like having a juvenile in charge of a superpower,” said construction worker Dan Kelly, 47. ‘Kill’ trade plans Britain voted to leave the EU in a referendum in June 2016, but after years of fighting within the government, only on Thursday published a detailed plan for future relations.The offer to follow EU rules in trade in goods sparked outrage among eurosceptics who want a clean break, with Trump appearing to back them.His negative comments about a UK-US trade deal — viewed as one of the main benefits of leaving the EU by Brexit supporters — saw the pound fall, although it later recovered its losses.They also fuelled talk of rebellion in May’s Conservative party following the resignations of Johnson and Brexit secretary David Davis over the plan.But Trump said Friday that after speaking with May’s officials and trade experts a UK-US trade deal “will be possible”.May confirmed they had agreed to seek an “ambitious” free trade agreement, adding: “I’m clear our plan delivers on what the British people voted for.”Even without opposition from Trump, the prime minister still faces a major challenge to get agreement at home and the plan agreed with the EU.Talks are due to resume in Brussels next week.’Tough on Russia’ The two leaders also emphasised their continued cooperation on defence and security, after earlier watching a display of special forces from both countries at the military academy at Sandhurst.Trump thanked May for her support at a testy NATO summit this week in Brussels, where he subjected America’s other allies to a roasting over their defence spending.The president followed his Chequers meeting by having tea with Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle alongside First Lady Melania Trump.May said they had agreed to engage with Russia with “strength and unity”, and Trump said he has been “tougher on Russia than anybody”.The president’s mother was born on the Scottish Isle of Lewis, and May gave him an illustrated ancestral chart of his Scottish heritage as a gift.She gave Melania, who met military veterans and schoolchildren in London on Friday with May’s husband Philip, a bespoke perfume.last_img

SC to consider communitys view against jokes on Sardars

first_imgDo Sardars feel bad about Santa Banta jokes on them? If so, the Supreme Court on Monday said it will seriously consider examining a plea to ban websites displaying jokes on them.“If we think that your community do feel bad about it, we will definitely seriously consider it,” a bench comprising Chief Justice T S Thakur and Justices AK Sikri and R Banumathi said.“Does your community stand by you,” the bench asked a Sikh woman lawyer Harvinder Chowdhary, who has filed a PIL in this regard.She said Delhi Sikh Gurduwara Management Committee(DSGMC) has also filed a petition on the same issue and they are engaging a battery of senior advocates including Ram Jethmalani to argue the matter.While the woman advocate was making submissions, the bench intervened and asked Additional Solicitor General P S Patwalia to express his views on the issue being a Sardar himself.last_img read more

The mother of lesser dogs

first_imgImagine, after a hectic mundane day, you return home exhausted, when your dog quickly runs towards you to welcome you with a drooling kiss and a wagging tail. You look at his innocent, kind face that seems to express his gratitude to you for being a great companion. So, what is so unique about the relationship between a man and his four-legged companion? It’s the “unconditional love” that both the parties shower on each other eternally. And it is not just the loyal, unconditional love; being the best playmates of humans, these little pooches are said to combat their owner’s depression or any other physical disorders as well. They affect us in a number of unbelievable ways as they ward off anxiety and dementia. Our canine companions are even proved to be excellent stress busters with their outstanding mood-lifting capabilities. It is an out-of-the-world experience to be blessed with a canine friend in life who is nothing less than our own children. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfSulakshmi Dasgupta, a resident of Chittaranjan Park in the Capital and a social activist, had set herself as an epitome of animal lover. Her extreme love for animals, especially dogs, has given shape to her plenary passion of feeding stray dogs across the city. Her promise to stand shoulder-to-shoulder in providing utmost nourishment to the strays genuinely makes her a mother of the canines. Sulakshmi’s journey began with feeding around 10 to 12 dogs a day in the vicinity of her locality. “I am extremely compassionate about dogs since childhood. When I was young, my eyes were always and only at the homeless, neglected dogs and I wondered how helpless they were. Other than feeding biscuits, I could hardly do anything to help them. Post my marriage; I received a huge moral and monetary support from my husband, Pinaki Dasgupta, who is also an animal lover. Then I, along with my small team started feeding approximately 70 dogs at places like C R Park, Kalkaji, Okhla and Greater Kailash. And today, the figure has swelled up to feeding 500 plus stray dogs across South Delhi.” Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe necessity to feed the strays on a regular basis is manifold. Being territorial in nature, dogs become restricted with a limited place to survive in metropolitan cities, which makes it difficult for them to hunt for food. They seldom go to another territory unless extremely hungry or to mate. Even in such situations, they sometimes come back wounded as the other areas are always protected by their respective alfa-males. Hence, the fate of many strays is to rely on poisonously rotten throwaways or waste food from roadside eateries, which is not enough for a healthy survival in a specified territory. Consequently, they end up being malnourished and hungry. Pinaki Dasgupta says, “She believes in never turning away a hungry stray. Her motto has always been helping the needy animals. Her helpers and she prepare 350 kgs of the meal including rice and chicken on a daily basis and distribute it among numerous dogs. Other than feeding, she also gives shelter to the accident victims whenever needed and provide them with veterinary services like neutering, operations, regular vaccination of anti-rabies, and offers post-operative care as well”. Sulakshmi said, “As far as my funding is concerned, there are some people around me who have also contributed to help me pursue my activity. A big or a small contribution is not the factor. It is their immense support that has always motivated me to keep moving ahead. I believe that taking small steps makes a huge difference. There was a time when the inflow of donations was not consistent. So I decided to sell off all my jewellery and heirloom collections as my four-legged babies are the gifts of God who mattered to me the most.” On being asked about the increasing violence towards neglected dogs, she said, “Our society comprises a section of insensitive humans. Pelting stones, hitting them with sharp objects and reckless driving contribute to fatal injuries or accidents. Fracture or amputations of legs are also getting common these days. My heart bleeds when I find these innocent, loyal animals in pain. Fortunately, such disturbances have witnessed a decrease in my locality and in some parts of Okhla.” After years of struggle and fighting all odds, Sulakshmi has brought such an act of daredevilry into public notice. 15 years of independent and benevolent service finally gave birth to an organisation called “Swargasaathi,” which is also useful in raising funds for the homeless. Satisfied with what she is doing in her life, Sulakshmi is living it up with two of her canine children at home. A big salute to the human parent!last_img read more