LETTER TO THE EDITOR Mark Kratman Is An Asset To Tewksbury  Wilmington

first_imgDear Editor,Mark Kratman has served Tewksbury well over the years and always had our best interests at heart. I worked closely with Mark on both the Wilmington and Tewksbury Chamber Of Commerce and The Tewksbury Economic Development Committee; he is always available and willing to help with any issues that face our town. He is a tremendous asset to our community and continues to be a strong advocate for our small business community.Mark met with businesses that expressed interest in doing business in Tewksbury and was among the first town officials to encourage them to move in and help them navigate our Town Government to acquire all necessary permitting. During his two terms as the Chairman of the Tewksbury Economic Development Committee, he worked with our town officials to improve Town Website and solicited Amazon and Lowell General Hospital to do business in Tewksbury. Mark understands the positive affects small businesses can have on our taxes and will continue to be a strong advocate for small business in both Tewksbury and Wilmington.The citizens of this district need someone like Mark who is not afraid to speak out on key issues that affect us all. Someone who was endorsed by the late Jim Miceli and knows his way around Beacon Hill.I hope my fellow citizens will join me on Tuesday, September 4 in voting for Mark Kratman for State Representative.Sincerely,Hanson BechatLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedLETTER TO THE EDITOR: Former Town Crier News Editor, Town Moderator Jayne Wellman Miller Endorses Mark KratmanIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Committee To Elect Mark Kratman Expresses Disappointment With Robertson Campaign’s TacticsIn “Government”A VOTER’S GUIDE To Democratic State Rep. Candidate Mark KratmanIn “Government”last_img read more

Researchers build nanoscale rotary apparatus using tightfitting 3D DNA components w Video

first_img PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen More information: P. Ketterer et al. Nanoscale rotary apparatus formed from tight-fitting 3D DNA components, Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501209AbstractWe report a nanoscale rotary mechanism that reproduces some of the dynamic properties of biological rotary motors in the absence of an energy source, such as random walks on a circle with dwells at docking sites. Our mechanism is built modularly from tight-fitting components that were self-assembled using multilayer DNA origami. The apparatus has greater structural complexity than previous mechanically interlocked objects and features a well-defined angular degree of freedom without restricting the range of rotation. We studied the dynamics of our mechanism using single-particle experiments analogous to those performed previously with actin-labeled adenosine triphosphate synthases. In our mechanism, rotor mobility, the number of docking sites, and the dwell times at these sites may be controlled through rational design. Our prototype thus realizes a working platform toward creating synthetic nanoscale rotary motors. Our methods will support creating other complex nanoscale mechanisms based on tightly fitting, sterically constrained, but mobile, DNA components. Play The assembly of the rotary apparatus. Credit: Philip Ketterer The tiny device built by the team represents the first example of a biologically inspired nanomachine capable of demonstrating dynamic motor-like behavior. It also represents a step forward in nanoarchitecture—the device was built molecule-by-molecule and perhaps is the first step towards the development of true nanorobots. They note also, that after watching their device in action, it is not difficult to envision such devices motoring around inside of people, in a way very similar to how bacteria get around. Design of a DNA-based rotary apparatus. Credit: (c) Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501209 Journal information: Science Advances Play A schematic animation of the passive rotary apparatus. The bearing around the rotor also gets slightly kicked around by water molecules but it is rigidly attached to the surface. (The water molecules by which the rotor gets kicked around due to their thermal energy are not explicitly shown in the movie.) Credit: Hendrik Dietz Group develops wearable, stretchable memory device for monitoring heart rate Scientists dream of building ever smaller motorized devices that could putter around inside the human body delivering medicines to ailing parts, toxins to tumors or simply serving as health monitors, but alas, such devices have not yet come to fruition—but they may be getting closer. In this new effort, the team in Germany has built a device based on synthetic DNA parts—it mimics, somewhat, the activities of flagella, the tiny arm-like appendages bacteria use as paddles to move around. It is only 40 nanometers tall but includes three main parts, a crank that spins, an axle bearing and a container to hold the other two parts together.It does not yet have a power source, thus it cannot be called a motorized device just yet, instead, it can move around due to thermal energy which creates colliding water molecules which in turn causes the crank to turn—the team cannot control the direction of the device yet either, but believe they may have a solution sometime in the near future. They plan to test ideas using laser heat, ion flow or even chemical reactions to cause the crank to turn, and hopefully allow for controlling direction. If they succeed such a tiny motorized device would be useful in more than just medical applications—it could also possibly be used to drive chemical syntheses or to pump molecules across barriers. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with Technische Universität München has built a nanoscale apparatus that could one day serve as the basis for an extremely tiny motorized device. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes how they built their device, how it works, and where they plan to take the new technology.center_img Citation: Researchers build nanoscale rotary apparatus using tight-fitting 3D DNA components (w/ Video) (2016, February 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-02-nanoscale-rotary-apparatus-tight-fitting-3d.html © 2016 Phys.org Explore further PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play A schematic representation of freely diffusing rotary apparatus with extended crank lever. Credit: Hendrik Dietz last_img read more

Uber Lights Up Drivers Windshields to Help Customers Find Their Rides

first_imgDecember 3, 2015 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Register Now » 2 min readcenter_img Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Uber is giving its customers a guiding light. The popular ride-hailing company is rolling out LED light strips on drivers’ windshields to help riders in Seattle identify their pickups.The bright, new initiative, simply called SPOT, aims to reduce wait times and to make it easier for customers to find their Ubers in dense traffic and in the dark. Announced earlier this week, the feature rolls out throughout this month in the Emerald City on a test basis, with the company already equipping an undisclosed number of drivers there with the innovative devices.Related: Uber Is Eating Up Taxi Rides in New York CityHow it works: Directly applied to windshields, the long, skinny light strips glow in multiple colors (blue, green, orange, pink, purple or yellow). When a rider requests a trip and is paired with a SPOT-enabled driver, she can select the color the driver’s light strip will display using a color wheel within the Uber app. When the driver arrives for pickup, the light strip glows in the selected color. Conversely, riders can hold up their phones to display the matching light strip color to quickly show their drivers where they are.Uber, repeatedly plagued by customer complaints about surge pricing and drivers’ bad behavior, frames SPOT as its latest “experiment” in its “ongoing effort to make Uber pickups as seamless as possible.” But is it bright enough to shine some positive light on the controversial company?   Related: Court Denies Uber’s Request to Appeal Class-Action Status of U.S. Driver Lawsuitlast_img read more