Entanglement without Classical Correlations

first_img Experiment reverses the direction of heat flow Citation: Entanglement without Classical Correlations (2008, August 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-08-entanglement-classical.html Quantum mechanics is full of counterintuitive concepts. The idea of entanglement – when two or more particles instantaneously exhibit dependent characteristics when measured, no matter how far apart they are – is one of them. Now, physicists have discovered another counterintuitive result that deals with the line between the quantum and classical worlds. Explore further Normally, when two or more particles are entangled (and seem to communicate with each other instantaneously), they not only share quantum correlations, but also classical correlations. Although physicists don’t have an exact definition for classical correlations, the term generally refers to local correlations, where information does not have to travel faster than the speed of light. So if entangled particles demonstrate correlations across large distances, you might assume that they will also have correlations across shorter distances. After all, if entangled particles can communicate at faster-than-light speeds, they should be able to communicate at slower-than-light speeds.But a team of physicists from the National University of Singapore, Mediterranean Technology Park in Barcelona, the University of Leeds, and the University of Bristol has demonstrated something different. They’ve theoretically shown that any odd number (greater than one) of entangled particles can exist without classical correlations. They explain this paradox in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.“One way of seeing this is as follows,” Vlatko Vedral, Professor of Quantum Information Science at the University of Leeds, told PhysOrg.com. “Entanglement means being correlated as far as many different measurements are concerned. Classical correlations mean being correlated as far as one particular measurement is concerned. That is why researchers usually think that when there is entanglement, there are also classical correlations. However, our paper shows that you have to be careful about making this inference.”As Vedral explained, generally when physicists measure entanglement, their measurements destroy the quantum correlations first, and then the classical correlations. “Entanglement represents excess of correlations, over and above classical ones. In other words, whatever cannot be accounted for locally is due to quantum entanglement. When you make local measurements on entangled particles, then you will invariably be destroying their correlations (both classical and quantum). Since quantum is in excess of classical, it is possible that you can first get rid of entanglement, but are still left with some classical correlations.” But to do the opposite of this – to get rid of the classical correlations and have only quantum correlations – is more difficult to comprehend.“Imagine that I tell you that I am a billionaire,” Vedral said as an example. “You would then infer that I certainly have 100 million somewhere in my assets. You would be very surprised, indeed, if I told you that this was not true and that I am actually not also a millionaire. You can’t have more, without have less as well (by definition).”This is not the first time that physicists have demonstrated entanglement without classical correlations. In 2006, Toth and Acin found an example of a three-qubit system that also shows this phenomenon. This three-qubit example has already been observed in the laboratory, and the physicists hope that their new example with any odd number of qubits can also be observed. They also expect that even numbers of qubits should exhibit the same effect, but do not yet have an example.“The key is that we are using one particular definition of classical correlations, which is in fact the main one used in the solid state physics (and is used to mark phase transitions among other things),” Vedral said. “This is based on average values of a set of observables and the key is that this set is not complete. However, when it comes to two particles (and two point correlations is what all solid state experiments are about) then you cannot have the situation that we found with three and more particles. Namely, if classical correlations vanish for two qubits, then so do the quantum ones.”The paradox that quantum correlations can exist without accompanying classical correlations could have some thought-provoking consequences. For instance, physicists often use a test of Bell inequalities to determine if local realism has been violated and that quantum correlations have occurred. But since Bell inequalities are based on classical correlations, the test doesn’t work for this example. This leads to the need for a new way to detect quantum correlations, based on different concepts.The study may also affect how physicists view the boundary between the classical and quantum worlds – a question at the foundation of physics. With this demonstration of the existence of a state that has quantum correlations without classical correlations, the physicists suggest that local realism might be used as the criteria to characterize the classical world.The result could also have practical applications – for instance, as a possible method for detecting phase transitions. Using quantum correlations only (instead of both quantum and classical) for detecting phase transitions could provide a more universal measurement than conventional methods.More information: Kaszlikowski, Dagomir; Sen(De), Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal; Vedral, Vlatko; and Winter, Andreas. “Quantum Correlations without Classical Correlations. Physical Review Letters 101, 070502 (2008).Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Researchers build nanoscale rotary apparatus using tightfitting 3D DNA components w Video

first_img PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen More information: P. Ketterer et al. Nanoscale rotary apparatus formed from tight-fitting 3D DNA components, Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501209AbstractWe report a nanoscale rotary mechanism that reproduces some of the dynamic properties of biological rotary motors in the absence of an energy source, such as random walks on a circle with dwells at docking sites. Our mechanism is built modularly from tight-fitting components that were self-assembled using multilayer DNA origami. The apparatus has greater structural complexity than previous mechanically interlocked objects and features a well-defined angular degree of freedom without restricting the range of rotation. We studied the dynamics of our mechanism using single-particle experiments analogous to those performed previously with actin-labeled adenosine triphosphate synthases. In our mechanism, rotor mobility, the number of docking sites, and the dwell times at these sites may be controlled through rational design. Our prototype thus realizes a working platform toward creating synthetic nanoscale rotary motors. Our methods will support creating other complex nanoscale mechanisms based on tightly fitting, sterically constrained, but mobile, DNA components. Play The assembly of the rotary apparatus. Credit: Philip Ketterer The tiny device built by the team represents the first example of a biologically inspired nanomachine capable of demonstrating dynamic motor-like behavior. It also represents a step forward in nanoarchitecture—the device was built molecule-by-molecule and perhaps is the first step towards the development of true nanorobots. They note also, that after watching their device in action, it is not difficult to envision such devices motoring around inside of people, in a way very similar to how bacteria get around. Design of a DNA-based rotary apparatus. Credit: (c) Science Advances (2016). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501209 Journal information: Science Advances Play A schematic animation of the passive rotary apparatus. The bearing around the rotor also gets slightly kicked around by water molecules but it is rigidly attached to the surface. (The water molecules by which the rotor gets kicked around due to their thermal energy are not explicitly shown in the movie.) Credit: Hendrik Dietz Group develops wearable, stretchable memory device for monitoring heart rate Scientists dream of building ever smaller motorized devices that could putter around inside the human body delivering medicines to ailing parts, toxins to tumors or simply serving as health monitors, but alas, such devices have not yet come to fruition—but they may be getting closer. In this new effort, the team in Germany has built a device based on synthetic DNA parts—it mimics, somewhat, the activities of flagella, the tiny arm-like appendages bacteria use as paddles to move around. It is only 40 nanometers tall but includes three main parts, a crank that spins, an axle bearing and a container to hold the other two parts together.It does not yet have a power source, thus it cannot be called a motorized device just yet, instead, it can move around due to thermal energy which creates colliding water molecules which in turn causes the crank to turn—the team cannot control the direction of the device yet either, but believe they may have a solution sometime in the near future. They plan to test ideas using laser heat, ion flow or even chemical reactions to cause the crank to turn, and hopefully allow for controlling direction. If they succeed such a tiny motorized device would be useful in more than just medical applications—it could also possibly be used to drive chemical syntheses or to pump molecules across barriers. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with Technische Universität München has built a nanoscale apparatus that could one day serve as the basis for an extremely tiny motorized device. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes how they built their device, how it works, and where they plan to take the new technology.center_img Citation: Researchers build nanoscale rotary apparatus using tight-fitting 3D DNA components (w/ Video) (2016, February 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-02-nanoscale-rotary-apparatus-tight-fitting-3d.html © 2016 Phys.org Explore further PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play A schematic representation of freely diffusing rotary apparatus with extended crank lever. Credit: Hendrik Dietz last_img read more

Awarding the scribes

first_imgEminent Hindi writer with more than 50 years of experience and creator of Jaltarang, Simmi Harshita was awarded on Wednesday for her rich literary contributions at the 3rd annual Kusumanjali Sahitya Samman 2014.The occasion, an annual initiative by Kusumanjali Foundation was organised to recognise contributions made by renowned  authors in the field of Hindi and Bengali literature.Present at the event, LK Advani, Member of Parliament, Lok Sabha was the chief guest  who presented the awards to Dr.  Ramkumar Mukhopadhayay for his Bengali contribution titled Dhanapatir Sinhaljatra and to Simmi Harshita for Jaltarang. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Commenting on the occasion the senior BJP leader promoted Indian languages and said that they should be used frequently even in abroad,’I was born under British rule. It was very humiliating that during foreign trips, people of different countries used to talk in their own language but people going from India mostly talked in English, even amongst themselves. It didn’t look nice.’ ‘There are some things which are very painful. One of them is not speaking ones language and speaking another language,’ Advani said at the event where he was felicitated. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixKusumanjali Foundation, founded and established by  writer  Dr Kusum Ansal seeks to promote and support the artisitc, literary, and cultural activities in the country. As a part of Foundation’s promotional programmes, the Kusumanjali Sahitya Samman was established in 2011 to recognize the talent of reknowned authors in the field of literature. Every year, two awards are givern to creative works in the genres of literature comprising fiction, shorrt story, poetry and drama. Nominations from a large number of literary works published during the last five-year periods were selected for the Kusumanjali Sahitya Samman  2014.Speaking at the occasion, Dr. Kusum Ansal, prolofic writer and Founder of Kusumanjali Foundaton said, ‘ The Kusumanjali Sahitya Samman was initiated with a view to recognise the merit and standards of excellence acheived by eminent authors and scholars in their respective field of literature. Our country holds a distinctive linguistic and literary history. The award-winning texts borrow cultural inspirations from the author’s mother tongue are are a rich source of contemporary yet classical Indian writing.’last_img read more

SC to consider communitys view against jokes on Sardars

first_imgDo Sardars feel bad about Santa Banta jokes on them? If so, the Supreme Court on Monday said it will seriously consider examining a plea to ban websites displaying jokes on them.“If we think that your community do feel bad about it, we will definitely seriously consider it,” a bench comprising Chief Justice T S Thakur and Justices AK Sikri and R Banumathi said.“Does your community stand by you,” the bench asked a Sikh woman lawyer Harvinder Chowdhary, who has filed a PIL in this regard.She said Delhi Sikh Gurduwara Management Committee(DSGMC) has also filed a petition on the same issue and they are engaging a battery of senior advocates including Ram Jethmalani to argue the matter.While the woman advocate was making submissions, the bench intervened and asked Additional Solicitor General P S Patwalia to express his views on the issue being a Sardar himself.last_img read more

Renowned classical singer Pandit Arun Bhaduri passes away

first_imgKolkata: Renowned classical singer Pandit Arun Bhaduri passed away at a city hospital on Monday morning after a prolonged illness, family sources said. He was 75 and is survived by wife and son. Pandit Bhaduri, considered to be one of the masters of Bengali songs and Bhajans, was suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other respiratory ailments for quite sometime. Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee expressed her grief over the demise of Pandit Bhaduri. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life “I am deeply saddened by the sudden demise of Pandit Arun Bhaduri, an exponent of Kirana, Rampur Gharana… “He was a guru at the state Sangeet Academy. In 2014, we had conferred Bangabibhusan award. I convey my heartfelt condolences to members of his family, friends and followers,” Banerjee said in a statement. The veteran singer had served as a guru (teacher) at the ITC Sangeet Research Academy, and was a top radio and television artiste. Pandit Bhaduri was trained in Indian music by Md A Daud and Md Sagiruddin Khan.last_img read more

The mother of lesser dogs

first_imgImagine, after a hectic mundane day, you return home exhausted, when your dog quickly runs towards you to welcome you with a drooling kiss and a wagging tail. You look at his innocent, kind face that seems to express his gratitude to you for being a great companion. So, what is so unique about the relationship between a man and his four-legged companion? It’s the “unconditional love” that both the parties shower on each other eternally. And it is not just the loyal, unconditional love; being the best playmates of humans, these little pooches are said to combat their owner’s depression or any other physical disorders as well. They affect us in a number of unbelievable ways as they ward off anxiety and dementia. Our canine companions are even proved to be excellent stress busters with their outstanding mood-lifting capabilities. It is an out-of-the-world experience to be blessed with a canine friend in life who is nothing less than our own children. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfSulakshmi Dasgupta, a resident of Chittaranjan Park in the Capital and a social activist, had set herself as an epitome of animal lover. Her extreme love for animals, especially dogs, has given shape to her plenary passion of feeding stray dogs across the city. Her promise to stand shoulder-to-shoulder in providing utmost nourishment to the strays genuinely makes her a mother of the canines. Sulakshmi’s journey began with feeding around 10 to 12 dogs a day in the vicinity of her locality. “I am extremely compassionate about dogs since childhood. When I was young, my eyes were always and only at the homeless, neglected dogs and I wondered how helpless they were. Other than feeding biscuits, I could hardly do anything to help them. Post my marriage; I received a huge moral and monetary support from my husband, Pinaki Dasgupta, who is also an animal lover. Then I, along with my small team started feeding approximately 70 dogs at places like C R Park, Kalkaji, Okhla and Greater Kailash. And today, the figure has swelled up to feeding 500 plus stray dogs across South Delhi.” Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe necessity to feed the strays on a regular basis is manifold. Being territorial in nature, dogs become restricted with a limited place to survive in metropolitan cities, which makes it difficult for them to hunt for food. They seldom go to another territory unless extremely hungry or to mate. Even in such situations, they sometimes come back wounded as the other areas are always protected by their respective alfa-males. Hence, the fate of many strays is to rely on poisonously rotten throwaways or waste food from roadside eateries, which is not enough for a healthy survival in a specified territory. Consequently, they end up being malnourished and hungry. Pinaki Dasgupta says, “She believes in never turning away a hungry stray. Her motto has always been helping the needy animals. Her helpers and she prepare 350 kgs of the meal including rice and chicken on a daily basis and distribute it among numerous dogs. Other than feeding, she also gives shelter to the accident victims whenever needed and provide them with veterinary services like neutering, operations, regular vaccination of anti-rabies, and offers post-operative care as well”. Sulakshmi said, “As far as my funding is concerned, there are some people around me who have also contributed to help me pursue my activity. A big or a small contribution is not the factor. It is their immense support that has always motivated me to keep moving ahead. I believe that taking small steps makes a huge difference. There was a time when the inflow of donations was not consistent. So I decided to sell off all my jewellery and heirloom collections as my four-legged babies are the gifts of God who mattered to me the most.” On being asked about the increasing violence towards neglected dogs, she said, “Our society comprises a section of insensitive humans. Pelting stones, hitting them with sharp objects and reckless driving contribute to fatal injuries or accidents. Fracture or amputations of legs are also getting common these days. My heart bleeds when I find these innocent, loyal animals in pain. Fortunately, such disturbances have witnessed a decrease in my locality and in some parts of Okhla.” After years of struggle and fighting all odds, Sulakshmi has brought such an act of daredevilry into public notice. 15 years of independent and benevolent service finally gave birth to an organisation called “Swargasaathi,” which is also useful in raising funds for the homeless. Satisfied with what she is doing in her life, Sulakshmi is living it up with two of her canine children at home. A big salute to the human parent!last_img read more

The language of music unites all

first_imgA big name in the Hindustani classical music, Pandit Bhajan Lal Sopori, who has enthralled the world with his mesmerising Santoor, is now all set to steal the show with his son Abhay Rustum Sopori on the occasion of ‘Delhi Classical Music Festival’ being held in the Capital today. Millennium Post chronicles the stories of the ‘King of Strings’ and his early life musical journey with son Abhay Rustum Sopori, his live performances worldwide and his music academy SaMaPa, which works as a catalyst to healing many people. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfHow did your musical journey begin?The saga began from the year 1953 when I was only five years. I was invited to give my first live performance in Srinagar auditorium. Later, in 1954, I was delighted to be a part of a children’s show which was aired on the radio in Srinagar. Performing at the Durgiana Temple in Amritsar in 1959 was also a memorable moment. Gradually, I delved into the technicalities and nuances of Santoor. And eventually, I was able to introduce my own style – Sopori Baaj. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveYou were 10-year-old when you gave your first performance at a conference? How did you manage to create magic at such a tender age?(Smiles)… I belong to a family of music. My family has played santoor for over six generations. In addition to inheriting the quality from my father and grandfather, blessings of my loved ones especially Kashmiris was bestowed upon me. How does it feel to perform alongside your son?It brings tears of joy along with pride when you see your child blossom as an artist. It was absolutely an out-of-the-world experience to give a live performance with my son Abhay in the year 1995 at Siri Fort Auditorium in Delhi. Over the years, Abhay has grown in stature as an artist. You are both, a santoor maestro and a Guru. How would you differentiate yourself in two roles?As a Guru, my teachings to my students are always imbued with a sense of honesty and dedication towards one’s work. Above all, one must have faith in God. Never give up. Sacrifice your life if required to accomplish your mission. My grandfather and father ingrained such values in me. On the other hand, I find myself in paradise while I perform.Your music academy SaMaPa aims at healing jail inmates through music; creating a bonding between them and the society. How does your academy meet these objectives?SaMaPa is just not a music school, but a relaxing agent as well. It was established keeping in mind the active promotion of classical music, especially among jail inmates. I remember the memorable moments spent with the prisoners. The bright smiling faces of the prisoners the moment we begin music is all I can see. Therefore, music is the best healer of pain. I have attempted to break the stigma attached to prisoners in society, through music. My son and I decided to bring out their musical side. I was amazed to see them composing ghazals of Sufi tradition and have always tried to encourage them to realise their untapped potential, pursue their interests and showcase their talent to society. You are considered as the ‘cultural bridge’ between Jammu and Kashmir and the rest of India. How do you think music links all cultures?I firmly believe in the fact that India stands as a unified nation when we talk about its own culture and music. The language of music unites all regardless of regional differences as our culture is our pride. Which nation you think is most welcoming in terms of music?I have taught music to students of Washington University in the US. Also, I was invited to perform in European Parliament in Brussels. My performances have been broadcast in India which was seen by Indians and audiences of Belgium, Norway, Egypt, England, Germany, Syria and the US. I have noticed that music has no language and knows no boundaries. Most importantly, respect, love and devotion are the three prime factors needed to appreciate music. If you love and feel the music, it can be understood by everyone irrespective of their nationality.last_img read more

Dravidian language family 4500 years old

first_imgThe Dravidian language family, consisting of 80 varieties spoken by nearly 220 million people across southern and central India, originated about 4,500 years ago, a study has found. This estimate is based on new linguistic analyses by an international team, including researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Germany, and the Wildlife Institute of India in Dehradun.The researchers used data collected first-hand from native speakers representing all previously reported Dravidian subgroups. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThese findings, published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, match well with earlier linguistic and archaeological studies.South Asia, reaching from Afghanistan in the west and Bangladesh in the east, is home to at least six hundred languages belonging to six large language families, including Dravidian, Indo-European, and Sino-Tibetan.The Dravidian language family, consisting of about 80 language varieties (both languages and dialects) is today spoken by about 220 million people, mostly in southern and central India, and surrounding countries. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIts four largest languages, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil and Telugu have literary traditions spanning centuries, of which Tamil reaches back the furthest, researchers said.Along with Sanskrit, Tamil is one of the world’s classical languages, but unlike Sanskrit, there is continuity between its classical and modern forms documented in inscriptions, poems, and secular and religious texts and songs, they said.”The study of the Dravidian languages is crucial for understanding prehistory in Eurasia, as they played a significant role in influencing other language groups,” said Annemarie Verkerk of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. Neither the geographical origin of the Dravidian language nor its exact dispersal through time is known with certainty.The consensus of the research community is that the Dravidians are natives of the Indian subcontinent and were present prior to the arrival of the Indo-Aryans (Indo-European speakers) in India around 3,500 years ago.Researchers said that it is likely that the Dravidian languages were much more widespread to the west in the past than they are today.In order to examine questions about when and where the Dravidian languages developed, they made a detailed investigation of the historical relationships of 20 Dravidian varieties.Study author Vishnupriya Kolipakam of the Wildlife Institute of India collected contemporary first-hand data from native speakers of a diverse sample of Dravidian languages, representing all the previously reported subgroups of Dravidian.The researchers used advanced statistical methods to infer the age and subgrouping of the Dravidian language family at about 4,000-4,500 years old.This estimate, while in line with suggestions from previous linguistic studies, is a more robust result because it was found consistently in the majority of the different statistical models of evolution tested in this study.This age also matches well with inferences from archaeology, which have previously placed the diversification of Dravidian into North, Central, and South branches at exactly this age, coinciding with the beginnings of cultural developments evident in the archaeological record.last_img read more

Grub Fest Most awaited food festival returns to Delhi

first_imgDelectable food, uncontrollable fun and unparalleled entertainment – all comes together under one roof at ‘The Grub Fest’, India’s most renowned culinary affair. This year’s edition, which will take place from March 6-8, makes its way back to the capacious Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium in the national capital. The Grub Fest is India’s foremost culinary affair with the most famed restaurants displaying their signature delicacies over some good music and hearty performances. The fest has manifested a remarkable journey starting from 30,000 visitors and 100 exhibitors in 2015 to 75000 visitors and 150 exhibitors in their latest edition. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThis year, the major highlights of Grub fest include restaurant exhibitors comprising of prominent names like Baking Bad, iHOP, Wok to Walk, Big Yellow Door, and others. Moreover, for the first time, this festival is introducing ‘The Grub Star Access’, a luxury food and dining experience giving each recipient the access to make them feel like a VIP.The next interesting addition is ‘Grub Street’ – the lifestyle zone where one can find upcoming brands selling fashion accessories, pop up shops, gifts etc. Also, ‘Grub Market’ dedicated to packed products, fresh produce, organic products and an assortment of delicious homemade delicacies will surely be grabbing eyeballs. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive’Grub Arena’ will witness artist performances, on-stage games and much more that will undoubtedly leave audiences mesmerized. The festival highlights some of Bollywood’s top artists like Guru Randhawa, DJ Frenzy, Jasmine Sandlers, who will fill the night with melody and bring the audience together for a festival to remember.Apart from the aforementioned attractions, ‘iSkate ring’, an exclusive ice-skating arena where one can strap on a pair of roller skates and wheel away their worries, ‘Edinger Beer Garden’ to sit back and enjoy and the ‘Juke Box’ that would provide a platform for young talented artists and DJ’s to showcase their skills are worth looking forward. You can enjoy the non-stop culinary treat and entertainment from 12 Noon to 10 PM. The early bird ticket is for Rs 250 at cleartrip.com whereas the regular is for Rs 399. Grub Star on clear trip, early bird would cost you Rs 600 whereas regular is for Rs 999. After 3 successful editions in Delhi, the event was also successfully launched for the first time in new cities, Gurgaon, Mumbai, Pune, and Chandigarh in 2017. With a collective footfall of over 3 lakh food enthusiasts, 300 restaurants, a line-up of prominent chefs and some of the top artistes in the country for entertainment, The Grub Fest has fast become the most awaited food festival of the country.last_img read more

Noble initiative for acid attack survivors

first_imgA 22-year-old Reshma Bano Qureshi and a 34-year-old Meena Khatun are the newly employed women under an odd but unique initiative by The Lalit Suri Hospitality Group. Both, survivors of a heinous crime – acid attack – are now working in the Flower Room, curating and creating flower arrangements for each room, providing the guests of the Lalit with a pleasing welcoming sight. It was Keshav Suri, the executive director of the group who is trying his best to give a better life and bring forth the marginalized communities into the mainstream. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIn the past, Kitty Su has hosted a night celebrating inclusivity and diversity, with India’s first wheelchair-bound DJ, Vinod Khullar. Kitty Su continued this trend in 2018 by having transgender Chef Trapani, a globally celebrated authority in Tex-Mex Food, take on a five-city tour.In addition to all of this, perhaps the most notable initiative by The Lalit Group in 2017 was their collaboration with the NGO, Make Love Not Scars to host a high fashion couture fashion show, Powerwalk, where acid attack survivors strutted down the ramp to let society know that beauty comes from confidence and acceptance. The show had outfits donated by 20 designers who came together to ignore competition and create a sense of belonging and unity. The Lalit also helped a survivor, Sonia with her surgery, hosted her stay at the hotel and invested in her dream to own a beauty parlour in Hyderabad. Over time, Keshav Suri’s inspiration to provide acceptance and equality to the survivors has driven the Lalit Group of Hotels to employ two acid attack survivors into the hotel’s family.last_img read more