Wretched West Indies against the ropes

first_imgMELBOURNE, Australia (CMC): Another wretched batting collapse left a deflated West Indies hanging by a string against Australia and staring another humiliating defeat in the face after only two days of the pivotal second Test. Under severe pressure after Australia piled up a daunting 551 for three declared in their first innings, the Windies displayed little character in reply, and their innings lay in ruins at 91 for six, on a chastening day at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. There were initial hopes the tourists would banish the nightmares of the Hobart first Test, when opener Rajindra Chandrika, who made 25, and partner Kraigg Brathwaite, who got 17, added 35 for the first wicket. But West Indies lost wickets in clusters. Three tumbled for 15 runs to leave them tottering on 50 for three, and after Jermaine Blackwood, who struck 28, and Darren Bravo (13 not out) put on 32 for the fourth wicket, the Caribbean side lost another three wickets for a single run in the space of 15 deliveries, to crumble again. The damage was done by left-arm spinner Nathan Lyon (2-18), along with fast bowlers Peter Siddle (2-19) and James Pattinson (2-36), all of whom picked up two wickets apiece to wreck the Windies innings. Left-hander Bravo, who has faced 75 balls in a defiant knock, will carry his side’s fight on the third day along with debutant all-rounder Carlos Brathwaite, who was unbeaten on three. Captain Steve Smith had earlier punched his sixth century of the year and 13th of his career with an unbeaten 134, while Adam Voges, at age 36, notched his fourth century of his debut year, as Australia built on their overnight 345 for three. The right-handed Smith, unbeaten on 32 at the start, struck eight fours in an innings lasting 177 balls, while Voges counted 12 fours off 166 deliveries, to follow up his brilliant unbeaten 269 in Hobart. Together, they posted 223 in an unbroken fourth-wicket partnership as the Aussies added a further 206 before declaring an hour before tea, with West Indies all but deflated. Fast bowler Jerome Taylor, who bowled just four overs on Sunday, finished with two for 97.last_img read more

13 championship events for Gibson McCook Relays

first_imgThe prestigious and exciting Gibson McCook Relays, slated for Saturday, February 27, will see the 4×200 metres Girls’ Open and the 4×200 metres for Class One and Two boys upgraded to championship events.These events will be part of a stellar cast of 13 mouthwatering championship showpieces inside what is expected to be a jam-packed National Stadium.The three events have been added by the organisers due to their prominence at the IAAF World Relays in recent years.Local appliance and furniture retail franchise Singer expressed delight with being drawn as sponsor of the 4x100m Institution Men’s Championship race, an event that could see Racers Track Club kingpins Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake, and other members of their institution square off against other top-level challengers.Besides Singer, 12 other championship marquee event sponsors were named last Thursday at the Knutsford Court Hotel in New Kingston, ahead of the Gibson McCook Relays’ 40th staging.Advanced Scales and Equipment snapped up the 4x100m high school boys’ Class One Championship, while the 4x100m High School Girls’ Under-19 Championship will be sponsored by Consumer Brand (Oral B).Beverage brand Lucozade will sponsor the 4x100m High School Boys Class Two Championship, while for the girls, Wisynco will sponsor the 4x100m High School Under-17.EVENT SPONSORSThe 4x400m High School Boys’ Open went to SOS Foods Limited and the girls’ equivalent went to CIBC First Caribbean International Bank, while Grace Foods will be the sponsor of the 4x400m Institution Men’s Championship.The 4x400m Institution Men’s Championship will be sponsored by Grace Foods, 4x400m High Schoolgirl’s Open by CIBC First Caribbean, and the 4x400m High School Boys’ Open sponsored by SOS Foods.Jamaica Biscuit Company and Consumer Brands (Head and Shoulders) selected the Boys and Girls’ High School 4x800m Open, respectively.There were 42 sponsored events for the Gibson McCook Relays, which is one of the most prestigious relay meets in the world.It began in 1976 in honour of Kingston College founder Bishop Percival Gibson and was later renamed after Neville ‘Teddy’ McCook.last_img read more

#JaVotes2016: Candidates move to calm supporters in Mountain View

first_imgThe PNP and JLP candidates for Eastern St Andrew, Fayval Williams and Andre Hylton have moved to bring the confrontation between their supporters at the Mountain View Primary School under control. “We understand that about 25 persons clad in orange showed up to vote but questions were raised about where they lived, but we went down and sorted out the situation and calmed tempers so that they could be allowed to vote in peace,” Williams told The Gleaner. For his part, Andre Hylton said that he has heard of the incident and that his team is on the ground managing the situation. “We heard of an incident at the Mountain View Primary but my team has gone down there to address the situation and to maintain calm,” he said. ST ANDREW EASTERN CANDIDATES JLP: Fayval Williams PNP: Andre Hyltonlast_img read more

Rehydrating after maximum exertion

first_imgThe Olympics will be held in Brazil this year. Despite the fears of side effects from the dreaded Zika virus, Jamaicans will be not only going to Brazil, they will be glued to television and radio stations during the Games, following in great detail the fortunes of our stars, who are expected to dominate the track and field section of the Games by winning the most gold medals.We didn’t get to be the ‘Sprint Capital’ of the world by chance. A significant reason for our dominance is rooted in the annual competition known as ‘Champs’. This annual ritual ensures that every schoolchild with talent is discovered and nurtured by coaches hoping to ensure that their charge goes on to not only secure points and bragging rights, but hopefully to become a future star who will regale a fawning public with stories about ‘who discovered me’.At my high school in the 60s, Wolmer’s Boys’, every one of the 600 enrolled boys had to enter at least one event in the eliminations for Sports Day. Thus raw and unexpected talent (mainly speed) was discovered and encouraged by House captains with an eye on winning on the day.Sports Day was also used as a trial for ‘Champs’. That same mindset now dominates the methods used to select the participants at ‘Champs’.Unfortunately, as Jamaica becomes more and more successful at sprinting (and now throwing) the quest to be the best seems to become the be all and end all of school. Sports and the financial benefits associated with excellence now trumps excellence at reading, writing and arithmetic.The recent innovation known as the Digicel Grand Prix provides financial benefits to schools and children who compete in weekend events in the months before Champs. This has resulted in our children competing almost on a weekly basis for points, which will add up to produce winners who are well rewarded.Unfortunately, this innovative method of incentives has forgotten that the participants are children, whose immature bodies are now stressed to unforeseen levels, resulting in what seems to me to be unprecedented levels of injuries that may derail the future potential of some of our more talented children.This incentivised desire to win at all costs is having a detrimental effect on our youngsters. Last Saturday’s well supported Gibson/McCook Relays is a case in point. I was shocked to see children running at maximum exertion in relays one or two hours apart, while open-mouthed reporters regaled the successful ones with unabashed praise, as if children performing multiple events in a 12-hour span is normal and should be encouraged.Years ago, the organisers of ‘Champs’ revised the number of events a child could enter after the great Lindy Delapenha, of Wolmer’s and Munro College, entered and did well in either eight or nine events.That limit has been further reduced by the governing body of ‘Champs’, ISSA, who apparently realised that these Games are for children!What I want to highlight in this article is the importance of refuelling after maximum exertion, a medical fact that can reduce the possibility of season-ending injury in children who are performing more than once in a 12-hour period.The three lines of defence after maximum exertion are fluid replacement, carbohydrate replacement and protein replacement.Drinking 16 to 24 ounces of fluid for every pound of weight lost in training or competition is strongly recommended. This fluid replacement will help to get the body of the child back in balance, remembering that sweat contains electrolytes (sodium, potassium and magnesium) therefore sports drinks are mandatory.During training and competition, the young athlete is relying mainly on stored carbohydrate fuel in the muscle, liver and blood to energise working muscles. Thus refuelling right after competitions (or exercise) can also decrease the chance of getting an injury. The muscle becomes a sponge ready to soak up and store needed ingredients for the next event.To complete the re-energising of muscles after training or competition, protein should be ingested in addition to the carbohydrate and fluids.A good rule is to eat or drink a healthy snack within 15 to 30 minutes of the event or hard training session and again two hours later. It is now well established that by adding protein to carbohydrate and fluids after competition, the body stores even more energy and recovers better than consuming carbohydrate alone.Athletes will find it hard to eat solid food after a hard workout or competition, so here are some suggestions for recovery fuel with at least 50 grammes of carbohydrate and 10 grammes of protein, necessary for maintaining good competitive health:(1) Eight ounces of orange juice and one small low fat yoghurt; (2) Eight ounces of Gatorade and one Power Bar; (3) eight ounces of apple juice and one peanut butter sandwich; (4) Twelve ounces soy milk and one ripe banana.These combinations are inexpensive and if consumed in the 15 to 30 minute window after competition can minimise the chance of injury while at ‘Champs’ or one of the other multi-event meets.last_img read more

Talent search – Francis looking to develop promising players for Fast5 netball team

first_img “I was asked in January to be part of one of the squads, but because I don’t want to limit my ability I took the contract for six months. But where fast5 is concerned I think we stand a good chance, it’s how you apply yourself on the day,” she explained. “Although we have had success in the longer version, I believe we have better success in Fast5 because we came second and third was our worst, so I found this is my calling in Jamaica and I am going to give it my best shot,” she said. “I never thought that I would be back in the national program, but I am back and I am elated. Coaching is my passion, where I go and coach I try to do it to the best of my ability. Now I am more experienced, when you talk about understanding the role of management and people who hire you to do a job. I can accept changes, I can make adjustments to who is in charge,” she said. Netball Jamaica president, Paula Daley-Morris, said her return to the fold should have a positive impact. “We want to have a separate coach for the Fast5 because it is such a different game, we needed someone with experience and a good track record and she (Francis) came to mind and we approached her and she accepted,” said Daley-Morris. “She has a lot of plans for the squad and the passion she brings is infectious. We are happy to have her back. She has had success like any of our other coaches, she is the one who got the silver in FASTnet, so she has the level and we are hoping she repeats it.” Continuing, she said: “We are making sure the best minds are around the game and we are providing them with opportunities not just for their natural talent, but for the good of the country.” National netball icon, Connie Francis, who was reappointed to the national netball program recently, said the experience she gained while outside of the Jamaica set-up will serve her well in a new role as head coach of the country’s Fast5 team. Francis, who coached the Sunshine Girls from 2006 to 2011, did a stint in St Lucia from 2012 to 2015, helping the eastern Caribbean to country to qualify for the Commonwealth Games for the first time in their history. She added that her involvement and assistance with the grassroots program there helped her realise she had a knack for developing talent. “It (job) will be a challenge because some players I would like (to have) in the squad may not be possible. So it’s about going around the island seeking talent. When I worked overseas I had to develop new talent and I realised that I have some ability to work on new talent and let them enjoy the game, so it’s about growth and having experience. “I want to see what these new girls bring, but I want to let them know that playing for the Sunshine Girls is a big task and whoever is chosen will have to give their best, so I am looking forward to really coaching them,” she told The Gleaner. Netball Jamaica gave Francis the option to choose the version of the game she wanted to assist with and based on her past experience she believes they have a greater chance of success in Fast5. GOOD CHANCElast_img read more

‘We are a dynasty’, says JC Principal at Manning Cup celebration

first_imgIn what they charge to be the new home of their recently retained ISSA-FLOW Manning Cup title, three-time consecutive holders Jamaica College celebrated fervently at their morning devotion inside the Karl Hendrickson Auditorium at 189 Old Hope Road yesterday.The victory was described as their sweetest, as administrative staff, players and well-wishers gushed, clapped, cheered and sang loudly.JC triumphed over perennial rivals St George’s College in a very close 1-0 match at Sabina Park, St George’s backyard, last Saturday.”We gathered at the school a couple Mondays ago to do some reflection. The Griffin (JC crest) was wounded, but the Griffin has risen again,” said principal Ruel Reid.His team had recently been thrashed 4-0 by St George’s in the FLOW Super Cup.However, JC emphatically rebounded to defeat their rivals on Saturday courtesy of Donovan Dawkins’ 88th-minute goal.”This is one of my proudest moments as principal of this great institution. For 33 years, JC had not won the Manning Cup. Since 2007, we have been to seven semi-finals, six finals and won five championships,” Reid said to resounding applause and cheers.”We are a dynasty. We are gonna make history. It’s gonna be a long, long, long time before anybody beats us,” he warned.”One College, the ‘True Blue’ College, has risen victorious,” he added in obvious reference to the shade of similar colours among the combatants – with JC referred to as the ‘Dark Blues’ and St George’s, the ‘Light Blues’.Amid the euphoric celebrations, captain Allando Brown paraded his team on the platform, where they held the trophy aloft.Citing Psalm 136, Vice-Principal Rohan Wong told the audience: “Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good. His love endures forever.”The Lord redeemed us in the final and gave us victory over St George’s College. His love endures forever,” Wong continued.Michael Bernard, chairman of the school board, said: “No mishap can allow us to believe that St George’s College was better than us. We have not lost a Manning Cup in three years. We are the defending champions. St George’s lost two Manning Cup games this year before meeting us in the final. How could they be better than us?” he questioned, to rapturous applause.Team manager Ian Forbes believes JC celebrated not only a trophy, but the emphatic way in which it was done, without losing a Manning Cup game since 2012.”This is our sweetest one to date. Three straight hasn’t been done in 52 years, and after being buried by a lot of persons, we found the resilience and determination and discipline to beat a team that many said were unbeatable,” Forbes told The Gleaner.shayne.fairman@gleanerjm.comlast_img read more

Jennifer Ellison-Brown | The skeletal system

first_img All freely movable joints share features which prevent friction between moving bones. One of the main features is the presence of synovial fluid between the moving bones. The bones are held together by slightly elastic fibres called ligaments, which allow the bones to move. Any damage to the ligament results in the joint losing some of its strength and stability. Joints work smoothly together when we perform sporting activities. They must be capable of their full range of movement in order to work well. The demands of sport put severe stress on joints. Therefore, it is essential to warm up before an activity and cool down after the activity. Joints can be injured as a result of impact, internal forces or a mixture of both. Examples are sprains, torn ligament and dislocation. That’s it for this week’s lesson. See you next week as we continue with the skeletal system. In these, a small amount of movement can occur. The bones are linked by cartilage. Cartilage is a tough but flexible cushion of tissue that stops the bones from knocking together (friction) and can also compress a little to allow slight movement. Slightly movable joints are found between most of the vertebrae in the vertebral column and the joint between the ribs and sternum. Freely movable joints (synovial) Bone Growth The human skeleton is composed of 206 bones. The skeleton is the framework of the body. Without it, the body would be shapeless. The bones are shaped according to their function. Bones may be: – Long, as in the arm and legs – Flat, as the sternum and scapula – Short as in the ankles and wrist – Irregular, as in the vertebrae – Round, as in the patellae The bones of the arms, legs, shoulders and pelvis make up the appendicular skeleton. The bones of the skull and face and the auditory ossicle, vertebrae, ribs, and sternum make up the axial skeleton. Bones develop in the growing foetus through a process called ossification. The skeleton is completely formed by the end of the third month of gestation (pregnancy). After birth, bone growth proceeds from the epiphyseal plates (growth plates). Growth proceeds from the end towards the centre of the bone. When the bone has reached its full size and growth ceases, the epiphyseal growth centres are replaced by bone cells. Longitudinal (length) bone growth and ossification usually continue in girls until about age 15 and age 16 in boys. However, bones continue to mature and develop their final shape until about 21 years of age. The whole growth process is controlled by hormones. If there are too many growth hormones, the cartridge in the plates grows too fast and result in gigantism, while too little hormone leads to dwarfism. Bone formation and resorption are caused by the actions of osteoblast and osteoclast. Osteoblast makes new bone, and at the same time, cells called osteoclast break it down. Exercise cause osteoblast to work harder. But, extreme training especially with weights at young age, can result in problem with bone deformity. Bones get more fragile as you age and can get weak and break easily (osteoporosis), especially in women. Fixed or immovable joints (fibrous) Functions of Bones Slightly movable joints (cartilaginous) Nutrients and Bone Growth Joints In these, bones are fused together by tough fibres. These types of joints are found in areas requiring strength. Examples are the joint between the plates of the cranium (skull) and the fused joints in the sacrum. There are five principal functions of bones. They: – support the body, enabling you to stand erect – protect the internal organs and tissues – assist movement by coordination with muscles and joints – provide storage areas for minerals – serve as sites for formation and development of blood cells in the bone marrow (haematopoiesis). The most important nutrients for growth are: – proteins – build cells and repair damaged tissues. Found in milk, cheese, eggs, fish, pulses and nuts. – vitamins – vitamin D helps with the absorption of calcium and is found in milk, fish, liver and eggs. The body also makes it with sunshine. – minerals – calcium, which give strong bones and teeth, is found in milk, cheese fish and green vegetables. A joint is where two (2) or more bones meet (articulate). There are over 100 joints in the body. Joints are divided into three (3) types based on the amount of movement they allow.last_img read more

‘Bolt’s records will be hard to beat’

first_imgAsafa Powell, the former holder of the 100 metres world record, believes that it will be hard to break the world sprint marks held by his illustrious Jamaican teammate Usain Bolt.Powell, who was speaking last week in India, says Bolt’s third lowering of the 100-metre record – to 9.58 seconds – was a great race. His opinion concurs with the view expressed early this year by another former world record holder, Donovan Bailey of Canada,”It will be very difficult to break these two records,” offered the 33-year-old Powell. Like the world record for 200 metres, Bolt set the current 100 metres standard at the 2009 World Championships in Berlin, Germany, with Powell getting third place.”I was pretty much the best starter in the world and he was already ahead of me at the start,” Powell recalled.Contrary to the general perception of the tall man from Trelawny being slow from the blocks, Bolt led the field from the very first step. He clocked 6.31 seconds at the 60-metre mark, which is superior to the world indoor record for 60 metres of 6.39.”So, he had a great race,” he said admiringly. “It’s going to be very hard for someone to come and match that run,” he stated.Powell set the world record at 9.77 seconds in 2005, equalled it twice before trimming it to 9.74 in 2007. Bolt accelerated that to 9.72 seconds before the 2008 Olympics and won the gold medal there with a miraculous run of 9.69 seconds.RECORDS LIKELY TO STAND”I would say it is likely to stand for a very long time,” he concluded of the 9.58 clocking. He did allow that the 100m record was slightly more vulnerable. “I feel the 9.58 is more likely to be broken,” he continued.The all-time performance list has the joint second-fastest 100-metre men alive, Jamaica’s Yohan Blake and American Tyson Gay, tied at 9.69 seconds while Blake’s personal best at 200 metres of 19.26 is closer to the Bolt world record of 19.19 seconds. Though Powell has a 200-metre personal best of 19.90 seconds and qualified for the 2004 200-metre Olympic final, he thinks Bolt’s world record in the curved sprint is astounding. “19.19secs in 200m is ridiculous,” Powell said.Earlier in the year, Bailey, the Olympic 100-metre champion in 1996, said the world records will stand for a long time. Bailey, who set a world record to win his Olympic gold medal, said: “Bolt has set the current bar high for sprinters and someone will be along to break his records in the far, far future.”last_img read more

Burrowes holds PGA ambitions

first_img The Hillel Academy standout launched on to the scene following a famous Junior Champion-ships win in the Republic Bank Caribbean Junior Championships tournament in Trinidad and Tobago in 2014, copping the top spot in Boys 11-13 category in that competition. He is working hard to continue making his mark in the sport. “Winning in Trinidad and Tobago got me known throughout the Caribbean. It was a good win for me, and I am working hard to continue improving and growing as one of the young golfers,” added Burrowes, who wants to be playing professional by age 22. shayne.fairman@gleanerjm.com WORKING TO MAKE HIS MARK Talented national junior golfer, Justin Burrowes, though admitting he was not at his best at this point, is determined to improve his game as the year progresses. Burrowes is hoping that these improvements will help in transitioning his career to the Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) level in the near future. The 17-year-old, though winning the blue tees trophy in the final game of the Jamaica Golf Association Junior Series last weekend, was not happy with his performance. He missed some games due to exams, but managed to rack up a total of 365 points. “Today was a pretty poor performance. I think my finishing was terrible, and I will just keep on pushing on and training hard on my game,” Burrowes shared after his outing. Next up for the player is the February Flights Classic at the end of month at the Caymanas Golf and Country Club, to be followed by the national trials in March. The teen could make Jamaica’s national team for the sixth consecutive year. “For sure, I can make the team this year. After this year, I want to get a zero handicap and play professional golf ultimately,” shared Burrowes. “I want to take small steps at a time and take on smaller tours, then to go on to PGA Golf, that is my dream,” Burrowes continued.last_img read more