Govt asks schools to allow random police checking around premises

first_imgNEW DELHI: The Delhi government has directed all schools in the national Capital to allow random checking by police personnel around their premises during the period of change of shift or closing of the school. The schools have also been asked to submit a report in this regard regarding the presence of police personnel or police van.The Task Force on Women Safety in Delhi has been holding meetings to ensure that actionable measures for women safety are taken. In one of the meetings, it was decided that Delhi Police should intensify random checking around schools, especially at the time of change of shift or closing of the school. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderIn a meeting held recently to review the progress on various action points relating to the recommendations of the Task Force, it was decided that all schools under the Directorate of Education (DoE) must ascertain as to whether these checkings are taking place or not, a senior DoE official said. It has accordingly been decided that all principals of government and private schools shall ascertain the presence of police personnel or mobile police van around school premises during the period of change of shift or closing of the school. Schools are also required to submit a report in this regard, the official added. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsThe DoE has also directed that in case of schools running in a double shift, principals of both the shifts of the school in consultation and coordination with each other shall depute two to three teachers for 15 minutes at the gate of school before the change of the shift and 15 minutes after closing. Similarly, in case of schools running in a single shift, heads of schools concerned shall depute two to three teachers for 15 minutes before the closing of the school and 15 minutes after closing. In June, the Dialogue and Development Commission constituted the Task Force for Women Safety in public transport in Delhi. The commission advises the Delhi government on key policy issues to ensure safety and improve the quality of commuting for women travellers on public transport in the national Capital. “The task force will conduct both off and on-ground reviews and monitor all existing schemes for women’s safety in Delhi, and will propose new plans for strengthening women’s safety in the Capital,” Jasmine Shah, Vice-Chairperson of the DDC, said.last_img read more

Man stabbed after intervening in dispute over dog in Oshawa Ont police

first_imgOSHAWA, Ont. – Police say a man was stabbed after intervening in a dispute over a dog in a community east of Toronto.Durham regional police say they responded to a report of a stabbing in Oshawa, Ont., on Tuesday afternoon and found a man with stab wounds.He was taken to hospital with non-life threatening injuries.Police say the victim was “an innocent bystander” who was stabbed by a man when he intervened in a dispute over a dog.They say the accused fled the scene in a vehicle and was arrested later at a home in nearby Whitby, Ont.Police say a 24-year-old Whitby man is charged with aggravated assault, assault with a weapon and breach of recognizance.last_img

Canada Post declares its operations back to normal just days before Christmas

first_imgOTTAWA — Canada Post says its operations are back to normal across the country, less than four weeks after its striking employees were forced back to work by federal legislation.The Crown corporation says it is restoring its delivery service guarantees across the country, now that its Vancouver operations have caught up on a backlog of parcels that it said had built up at its main western sorting plant.On Tuesday, the national mail carrier announced that service guarantees were being put back in place everywhere except Vancouver for the first time since Nov. 13, when rotating strikes caused parcel logjams at most of its distribution centres.The rotating walkouts started Oct. 22 to pressure Canada Post into accepting contract demands from the Canadian Union of Postal Workers, and ended once a back-to-work bill was passed in Ottawa on Nov. 27.Efforts to mediate an end to the labour dispute under that legislation failed on Tuesday with arbitrator Elizabeth MacPherson declaring Canada Post and CUPW too far apart to continue negotiating.Both sides are to begin an arbitration process next month that’s expected to result in a contract being imposed on the corporation and its 50,000 unionized employees.CUPW has said it will challenge the Trudeau government’s back-to-work legislation in court.Meanwhile, the union announced Thursday that rural and suburban mail carriers, or RSMCs, will see pay raises of up to 25 per cent and other benefit improvements in late January, thanks to a separate arbitrator’s ruling on a pay-equity dispute issued earlier this year.The ruling, which affects up to 8,000 Canada Post workers, imposed pay hikes that will see hourly wage rates for some full-time employees increased from $20.03 per hour up to $26.60 per hour. Base salaries for permanent relief employees are being bumped from $60 to $90 per day when they are not covering delivery routes.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Bahrain UN rights office deplores activists arrest

Nabeel Rajab was arrested on Wednesday as he returned to Bahrain following a trip overseas where he discussed the human rights situation in his country with a number of interlocutors, including the UN, according to the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Initially charged with publicly insulting a Government institution on social media, Mr. Rajab has been detained for a week pending investigation. “We urge Bahraini authorities to immediately release Nabeel Rajab and all other individuals detained for peaceful exercise of their rights,” OHCHR spokesperson Rupert Colville told a news briefing in Geneva. “Human rights defenders in Bahrain must be able to carry out their work without fear of reprisals.”Mr. Rajab’s detention is the latest incident involving the arrest of a prominent human rights defender by Bahraini authorities, coming just one month after activist Maryam al-Khawaja was stopped and charged with assaulting two police officers. Ms. Al-Khawaja was detained while travelling to Bahrain on her Danish passport to visit her father, Abdulhadi Al-Khawaja, who was sentenced to life in prison in 2011 and whose health condition is reportedly deteriorating.She was subsequently detained at the airport, apparently because her Bahraini passport had expired. She was then transferred to a women’s prison on charges of assaulting a police officer but has since be conditionally released. “The detention of high-profile human rights activists like Nabeel Rajab and Maryam Al-Khawaja sends a chilling message to other lesser-known activists of the consequences they may face for any criticism of the authorities,” Mr. Colville continued, noting that Mr. Rajab had already expressed apprehension regarding the potential reprisals he expected to face upon his return to Bahrain. “Human rights defenders in Bahrain must be able to carry out their work without fear of reprisals,” he added. read more

Week In Brussels – Week ending Friday 20 September 2013

DOWNLOAD1. European new car registrations fall 5% in August2. EU and Singapore present text of comprehensive free trade agreement3. EUCAR publishes research and innovation priorities in “Sustainable Propulsion”4. Single Market Month to kick off with debates on jobs5. Week aheadClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)

Former BuxtonFoulis NDC Chairman charged with cultivating marijuana

A former Chairman of the Buxton-Foulis Neighbouring Democratic Council (NDC) who was allegedly caught by investigators cultivating marijuana in his yard was on Tuesday charged with the offence.Accused: Randolph BlairRandolph Blair appeared at the Vigilance Magistrate’s Court before presiding Magistrate Peter Hugh and had the charge read to him.He denied that on March 9, 2018, at Buxton he was found to be cultivating the illegal plants in his yard.Blair was however, granted $150,000 bail and is expected to return to Court later this month.Reports surrounding the charges laid against him revealed that ranks of the “C” Division received a tip informing them of the activities of Blair.As such, the lawmen launched an operation in the said area. On the day of Blair’s arrest, the ranks reportedly swooped down at the former Chairman’s farm where the discovery was reportedly made.Marijuana plants as well as seedlings were reportedly found in buckets. Blair who was present was held and taken into custody where he was later charged. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedWanted Buxton man accused of rape apprehendedJanuary 17, 2018In “Crime”Kuru Kuru farmer charged for marijuana cultivationJanuary 25, 2019In “Court”Duo charged for allegedly cultivating 2 acres of Marijuana plantsSeptember 22, 2015In “Crime” read more

Explainer Why did Snapchat turn down Facebooks 3 billion offer

first_imgWITH SNAPCHAT REJECTING a $3 billion (€2.2 billion) offer from Facebook, one of the hottest photo apps out there is currently in the spotlight. The app has been growing in popularity in recent times and shows no signs of stopping.But what exactly is Snapchat? And why is Facebook so keen to buy it, considering it already has Instagram?So what is Snapchat?Snapchat allows you to message photos to a friend that will self-destruct in 10 seconds or less. Once those photos are destroyed, there is no way you can get them back. While it was released back in September 2011, its novel approach to sharing meant that the app has grown in popularity over the last year and a half. Currently, there are more than 350 million photos shared on the app every day, equaling Facebook’s total.It also launched two new features recently. The first is called SnapKidz, which is Snapchat for kids under 13. The second is called Stories, which allows you to send photos to a group of friends. These photos stay up for 24 hours and are shown in a feed similar to Facebook which only select friends can see.(Video: Snapchat/YouTube)But you can take screenshots on your phones. Doesn’t that defeat the purpose of self-destructing photos?It thought of that. If someone takes a screenshot of a photo sent to them, the person who sent it is automatically alerted. This is to make sure any potentially embarrassing photos aren’t shared without you knowing about it and prevent people from thinking it’s a good idea.Now that I think about it, isn’t that the app that all about sexting?If you were to believe the rumours, then yes. There were rumours about teenagers using it as a way of sexting, something that wasn’t helped by a number of media outlets reporting on it, but its co-founder Evan Spiegel said that it’s not the purpose of the app.(Snapchat allows user to draw pictures and insert captions over their photos. Image: Snapchat)So why would Facebook bid $3 billion on it?Many reasons. The first is that it’s very popular with teenagers, a demographic that Facebook has been trying to tie down for quite a while. The company has seen a drop in the number of teenagers using the site in recent months and it’s a problem that it has still yet to address.Mobile is also a huge factor behind the bid. Facebook has been putting all its efforts into developing its mobile apps such as Messenger because that’s where its audience is going to be in the future.Since Snapchat is a popular mobile messaging app that focuses on photos and young people, it’s the perfect app to help Facebook achieve this. That was the reason why it bought Instagram for $1 billion – which later became $715 million plus stock – and is the same reason why it tried to buy Snapchat.(Facebook has been concentrating all its efforts on mobile, something its founder Mark Zuckerberg has been trying to achieve for the past two years. Photo: AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)Wouldn’t it be cheaper for Facebook to just create its own version? It did a year ago, but it failed miserably. It released its update to an old feature, Facebook Poke, back in December 2012 and it quickly reached number one in the Apple and Google Play store.This was due to it advertising it on its mobile app which drove downloads, but by the end of the month, it began to free fall.  A lack of originality meant that people quickly grew tired of it and either went back to Snapchat or dropped it entirely.If that was me, I would have taken the $3 billion and ran with it.You’re not the only one.So why didn’t Snapchat? Turning down that amount is crazy!Because its potential means that it could be worth so much more. Reports say that Spiegel isn’t considering any possible acquisitions or investments until early next year and is hoping that the number of users and messages sent on Snapchat will grow, meaning its value will grow.The app is still getting offers for investment that could value it at more than $4 billion (€2.9 billion) and that’s before it has made any money yet.Wait a second, it hasn’t made any money yet?Correct. Snapchat doesn’t have a business model yet, but neither did Instagram until a month ago and it was purchased by Facebook back in April 2012. It’s currently working on the best way to make money from it.Why has it not figured that out yet? Because its product lives or dies by how many users it has and keeps. In the case of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat, the user is the product and nobody wants to be bombarded by ads the moment they sign up.Keeping those users without doing anything to upset them is vital to their success and it’s the reason why most sites take a softly-softly approach when they introduce ads.Read: Snapchat rejected $3 billion offer from Facebook – report >Read: 11 per cent of people in Ireland now have Snapchat (but just 3% have Vine) >last_img read more

40 years of Folens Christmas annuals in pictures

first_imgAll images via Insight/FolensThere are some obvious gaps in the archives for the eighties and nineties, and Folens are urging anyone who might have one or two old annuals lying around to get in touch.You can also send them to us here at tips@dailyedge.ie.Folens are also in the process of donating 12,000 Christmas annuals to the various children’s wards across the country in conjunction with the charity Yoobyoo.Got any memories of the Christmas annuals? Let us know in the comments…Look familiar? Irish school books through the years>15 things that everyone did in primary school>8 schoolbook traditions future kids may never understand> WHEN YOU WERE a kid, Christmas wouldn’t have been Christmas without a Folen’s annual – Sugradh, Sonas, Siamsa or Spraoi.Remember the excitement the day they would finally arrive and the teacher would unpack them, full to the brim with quizzes, comics, stories and colouring-in opportunities?Folens are now encouraging annual fans to take a trip down memory lane and dig out any old books they might have around the house.Here’s a selection of 34 covers, from 1972 to 2012…last_img read more

Guns an IS flag and 3kg of explosives found as French police

first_imgGuns, an IS flag and 3kg of explosives found as French police foil terror plot Two men were arrested just days before the first round of France’s presidential election. 31 Comments Tuesday 18 Apr 2017, 7:13 PM Apr 18th 2017, 7:13 PM 12,752 Views Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Short URL Share Tweet Email center_img Image: Claude Paris AP/PA Images POLICE ARRESTED TWO men in Marseille today on suspicion of planning an attack, just days before the first round of France’s presidential election, with bomb-making materials and guns found in searches.The foiled plot sparked fears that the closing days of the campaign could be a target for extremists ahead of Sunday’s vote, the country’s most unpredictable election in decades.A prosecutor told AFP that 3kg of explosives, guns and an IS flag were found during their search.Elite police and agents from France’s domestic intelligence agency detained the two Frenchmen – identified only as 23-year-old Clement B. and Mahiedine M., 29 – in the Mediterranean port city and Interior Minister Matthias Fekl said they were known to be “radicalised”.“They were aiming to commit in the very short-term, in other words in the next few days, an attack on French soil,” Fekl said.Police found guns and bomb-making materials in searches across Marseille. Later in the day, soldiers and police were still sealing off a road where one of the men was arrested.Officials gave no indication of who the men had been targeting, but the campaign team of far-right candidate Marine Le Pen linked the arrests to her planned campaign visit to the city tomorrow.“The fact that the two individuals were arrested in Marseille as Marine Le Pen was preparing to hold a meeting the following day is perhaps not a coincidence,” a member of her entourage said.Photos of the two suspects in the plot were distributed last week to the security teams for Le Pen and centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron.Conservative candidate Francois Fillon was also warned about the danger last week, an aide said.France remains under a state of emergency after being a frequent target of terror attacks by jihadists that have killed more than 230 people since January 2015.In the deadliest attack, Islamic State gunmen and suicide bombers slaughtered 130 people in Paris in November 2015.Candidates have been heavily guarded during the election campaign, but so far there have been few security scares.Election race narrowingOn the campaign trail, the race was narrowing ahead of Sunday’s vote, with the pack closing behind frontrunners Macron and Le Pen.For weeks, centrist former banker Macron and National Front (FN) leader Le Pen have been out in front but opinion polls now show any of the four leading candidates could reach the second-round run-off on 7 May. Source: SIPA USA/PA ImagesScandal-plagued Fillon and far-left firebrand Jean-Luc Melenchon have closed the gap dramatically in the last two weeks.“We have never seen a four-way contest like this in the first round of a presidential election,” Frederic Dabi of the Ifop polling institute told AFP.“There has been a real tightening of the race with four candidates between 19% and 23%.”Macron and Le Pen are tied on 22-23%, with Fillon improving to around 21% and Melenchon surging as high as 20% in some polls.With Le Pen expected to reach the second round, polls continue to indicate that whoever faces her will win, although after Brexit and Donald Trump’s US presidential election win, no one is taking anything for granted.Melenchon has made the most remarkable breakthrough in recent weeks with a far-left programme that includes huge public spending and a pledge to renegotiate all European Union treaties.- © AFP 2017Read: Le Pen promises to suspend all immigration if electedRead: Latest poll has Le Pen and Macron head-to-head in French presidential race Police officers outside an address in Marseille. Police officers outside an address in Marseille. Image: Claude Paris AP/PA Images http://jrnl.ie/3345935 By AFPlast_img read more

Expérimentation animale en Angleterre un test sur deux utilise des individus génétiquement

first_imgExpérimentation animale : en Angleterre, un test sur deux utilise des individus génétiquement modifiésRoyaume-Uni – En 2009, plus de 50% des animaux utilisés dans les laboratoires britanniques ont été au préalable génétiquement manipulés. Inquiétude des protecteurs des animaux.Sur 3,6 millions d’expériences réalisées outre-Manche l’année dernière, 48% seulement ont utilisé des animaux génétiquement intacts. Des chiffres qui relancent la colère des associations militant pour le bien-être animal. À double titre.À lire aussiLa harpie féroce, l’un des plus grands et plus puissants rapaces au mondeD’abord, le volume de manipulations destinées à implanter des anomalies génétiques sur les animaux destinés à des tests a augmenté de 10 % depuis 2008. Une pratique qui, selon les défenseurs des animaux, n’est pas à l’honneur du gouvernement.Ensuite, selon Barney Reed, scientifique membre de la Société royale pour la prévention contre la cruauté envers les animaux (RSPCA), le nombre total de bêtes (OGM ou non) utilisées en 2009 témoigne du fait que, en Angleterre, depuis la mise en place de la législation sur l’expérimentation animale il y a plus de 20 ans, le procédé est plus courant aujourd’hui qu’il ne l’a jamais été ces deux dernières décennies.Malgré la baisse de 1% du nombre de ces expériences, chiffre avancé par le ministère de l’Intérieur qui se dit toujours engagé dans cette voie, les militants pointent du doigt les conditions de stress et de souffrance pour les animaux de laboratoire.  Le 7 août 2010 à 13:18 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Immigration bill divides GOP

first_imgWASHINGTON — Some feisty Republicans are challenging a claim widely held among GOP leaders that the party must support more liberal immigration laws if it’s to be more competitive in presidential elections.These doubters say the Republican establishment has the political calculation backward. Immigration “reform,” they say, will mean millions of new Democratic-leaning voters by granting citizenship to large numbers of Hispanic immigrants now living illegally in the United States.The argument is dividing the party as it tries to reposition itself after losing the popular vote in five of the past six presidential elections. It also could endanger President Barack Obama’s bid for a legacy-building rewrite of the nation’s problematic immigration laws.Many conservatives “are scared to death” that the Republican Party “is committing suicide, that we’re going to end up legalizing 9 million automatic Democrat voters,” radio host Rush Limbaugh recently told Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., a leader of the bipartisan team pushing an immigration overhaul.Strategists in both parties say several factors, including income levels, would make many, and probably most, newly enfranchised immigrants pro-Democratic, at least for a time.last_img read more

Fisherman caught using lobster traps off Key West

first_imgKEY WEST, FLA. (WSVN) – Fish and wildlife officers arrested a fisherman off Key West after, they said, he was caught using lobster traps, Thursday.According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, officers caught Jeremy Homerston pulling the traps into a commercial boat.He has been charged with violating fish and wildlife management rules and possession of lobster traps without tags.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

Stranger Things 3 reviews are out Best season by leaps and bounds

first_img TV and Movies i really loved new #StrangerThings but i’m most excited for everyone to see it and fall madly in love with maya hawke, who is just wonderful. she stole the season for me. pic.twitter.com/66UajQQ1yo— lindsey romain (@lindseyromain) July 1, 2019 So there’s not much more I can say, but I was so impressed with the way specific ships sailed & laughed out loud at least once per episode (mostly at DAD Hopper). Also a shopping scene 🥰 #strangerthings— Emily Longeretta (@emilylongeretta) June 30, 2019 1 Stranger Things is looking good. Netflix Things are about to get Strange. The third season of Netflix’s hit series Stranger Things arrives on July 4, and while it may be a stressful summer in Hawkins, Indiana, it’s looking like a great one for fans. The embargo for reviews lifted on Sunday, and critics shared their opinions.  Now playing: Watch this: I think I can finally tell you that #StrangerThings is the show’s best season yet. It’s not perfect (more on that later) but there are moments that are so good, so funny, so deeply heartfelt that it will leave you breathless. It’s also spectacularly gross and I loved it.— Crystal Bell (@crystalbell) June 30, 2019 We know from the recent final trailer that Billy (Dacre Montgomery) could be the target of some Upside Down evil this season. But apparently he’s also a great character this year. “Billy f****** owns,” Colburn writes. Look at this baller piece of clothing pic.twitter.com/bbwhkjQLTI— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 Now that I’ve seen some of #StrangerThings I am not only hit with a huge powerful wave of nostalgia (I was 9 in 1985) I am seriously wondering if we’ll see the absolute worst 80s fashion come back in style. Again.— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 i’ve watched #StrangerThings twice now and i think people who already hate it will find even more to hate but i truly believe the show transcends its inelegant ’80s pop culture flirtations with top-notch character work and archetypal subversion. billy fucking owns.— Randall Colburn (@randallcolburn) June 30, 2019 See all the Stranger Things season 3 photos And CNET sister site ComicBook.com says the 1980s references are just too much. “It’s entertaining to see beloved characters embracing the spirit of goofy ’80s films, but these homages feel so blatant that it feels more like a parody than a tribute,” the ComicBook review reads.Character critiquesThere will be plenty of familiar faces and a few new ones in Hawkins this season. Who stands out? She’s not alone in calling this season the best so far. Randall Colburn, internet culture editor for The AV Club, calls season 3 the show’s “best season by leaps and bounds.” Stranger Things 3 a brilliant return to form Share your voice To Lindsey Romain of Nerdist, the standout is 20-year-old Maya Hawke (yes, real-life daughter of Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman), who plays new character Robin, who apparently works with Steve at Scoops Ahoy, the ice-cream shop in Starcourt Mall. “She stole the season for me,” Romain writes. it’s the best season by leaps and bounds— Randall Colburn (@randallcolburn) June 30, 2019center_img It’s what fans wanted to hear. CNET’s own Jennifer Bisset calls season 3 “a brilliant return to form,” adding that it brings the focus back to the elements that made the first season such an unexpected hit. “This season’s sense of fun, along with its relationship drama and multiple odd pair-ups bring humor and touching moments that recall Game of Thrones at its best,” she writes.MTVNews culture director Crystal Bell tweeted, “I think I can finally tell you that #StrangerThings is the show’s best season yet.” Wrote about the new season of #StrangerThings, which is basically a love letter to old-school tech, shopping malls &, of course, dope retro fits & wild haircuts. The Duffer Brothers did it again: best season yet. (Fret not, didn’t spoil the sauce for you.) https://t.co/pBJ9lcm78S— Edgar Alvarez (@abcdedgar) June 30, 2019 And Police Chief Jim Hopper brings the laughs, according to Emily Longeretta of Us Weekly, who says she “laughed out loud at least once per episode (mostly at DAD Hopper).” Some of the humor in #StrangerThings this season is very broad – too broad, especially early on. On the other hand, this felt like the goriest season yet, which, of course, I was very happy about. I had a couple “oh, I probably shouldn’t be eating right now” moments. Yay, gore!— Eric Goldman (@TheEricGoldman) July 1, 2019 Comment Tags Back to the futureIf you’re a 1980s nostalgic, get ready for an awesome and totally tubular summer, as numerous critics say the show’s 1980s references are back. Edgar Alvarez of Engadget not only proclaims this the “best season yet,” but declares the new season is “basically a love letter to old-school tech, shopping malls &, of course, dope retro fits & wild haircuts.”But not everyone is ready for those faddish fashions to return. For reference, I was a huge supporter of jams shorts. Internet picture for reference. pic.twitter.com/Fb2eRCEP6V— Aᴀʀᴏɴ Pʀᴜɴᴇʀ (@AaronFlux) July 1, 2019 Stranger Things season 3: Everything to know Originally published July 1, 12:36 a.m. PT. Update, 9:25 a.m. PT: Adds more reviews.  And at press time, the third season had a 92 percent Certified Fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and a Metascore of 71, indicating “generally favorable reviews,” on CNET sister site Metacritic.Stranger Things season 3 will be available on Netflix on July 4. 59 Photos Gross-out gangAnd in case you forgot this show has a horror theme, Eric Goldman of getFandom is there to remind you. “This felt like the goriest season yet,” he writes, “I had a couple ‘oh, I probably shouldn’t be eating right now’ moments. Yay, gore! 2:33 Our season 3 review Netflixlast_img read more

Daimler ships out first electric Freightliner semi truck in the US

first_img Tags Freightliner Electric Cars Car Industry Trucks More about 2019 Mercedes-AMG GT53 4-Door Comments Check out the Level 2 Freightliner Cascadia big rig at CES 2019 Review • 2019 Mercedes-AMG GT53 4-Door review: Defying expectations Now playing: Watch this: 22 Photos 2019 Chevy Malibu review: Swing and a misscenter_img 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Share your voice 3 The first self-driving big-rig hits the road in Nevada 1:53 More From Roadshow Look for the first ones in Southern California Daimler First came the electric Freightliner box truck, and now we have the semi truck. Daimler said on Monday it’s built the very first eCascadia semi trucks and they’re on their way to the first lucky customers in the US.If the eCascadia looks and sounds familiar, that’s because it’s based on Freightliner’s normal Cascadia semi. Rather than its internal-combustion engine, there’s a battery-electric powertrain with a 550-kWh battery pack. Daimler has previously said the electric powertrain makes 730 horsepower and is good enough for 250 miles of range. Plug the big semi into the right connector and 80% of the battery’s capacity returns in 90 minutes.The electric semi isn’t exactly going into production just yet, however. Instead, the first eCascadias will be part of a “Freightliner Innovation Fleet” before the truck enters series production in late 2021. Penske and NFI are the two companies that will add the electric semi to their ranks first.Penske also took delivery of one of the first eM2 box trucks, the other electric truck from Daimler’s Freightliner division. Each of the eCascadias will operate in Southern California by the end of the year. Freightliner said it will deliver additional eCascadias to customers throughout this year.Effectively, Daimler has beaten Tesla to the electric semi market. The Silicon Valley-based automaker has promised the Tesla Semi will enter production soon, but so far, it hasn’t. Instead, the Semi has been used to deliver other Tesla vehicles and haul between the Gigafactory and various places.Yet, Daimler has spread its electric truck portfolio out. Not only does it have the eCascadia and the eM2, the automaker also showed off the Fuso eCanter and even an electric school bus.last_img read more

Dispose of drug cases within 6 months HC

first_imgHigh-CourtThe High Court on Tuesday asked trial courts to dispose of cases filed under the Narcotics Control Act within six months, reports UNB.The HC bench of justice M Enayetur Rahim and justice Md Mostafizur Rahman passed the order while hearing a bail petition filed by an accused in a drug-related case.The court also asked the deputy commissioners, superintendents of police and investigation officers of the cases concerned to provide all kinds of assistance so that the trial proceedings are completed as soon as possible.Besides, the HC asked the state counsels and investigation officers of the cases to take necessary steps to ensure the appearance of witnesses in courts and ordered legal action in case of their failure.Assistant attorney general Yunus Mahmud Morshed said law enforcers arrested Mizanur Rahman Baroi of Rajoir upazila in Madaripur district along with 600 yaba tablets on 1 December 2015 and since then he has been in jail.“Not a single witness has so far been produced before the court in the case filed in this connection and the High Court expressed its dissatisfaction over the matter before pronouncing the order,” he said.With the order, the trial proceedings of new drug-related cases will have to be disposed of within six months after submission of charge-sheets, Yunus said.He, however, said the HC did not set any timeframe for disposing of old cases. “It only asked for completing the trial proceedings as soon as possible,” he said.last_img read more

8 recipes to master Promises in ECMAScript 2018

first_img console.log(‘Before promise created’); console.log(‘Before promise created’); console.log(‘Before promise created’); console.log(‘Before promise created’); console.log(‘After promise created’); } Create a function addBoosters that throws an error: function addBoosters (rocket) { throw new Error(‘Unable to add Boosters’); } Create a function performGuidanceDiagnostic that returns a promise that rejects an error: function performGuidanceDiagnostic (rocket) { return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) { reject(new Error(‘Unable to finish guidance diagnostic’)); }); } Use Promise.resolve to pass the rocket object to these functions, and chain a catch off each of them: export function main() { new Promise(function (resolve) { }); console.log(‘Before promise created’); const rocket = {}; Promise.all([]) console.log(‘After promise created’); } Attach a then call to the chain and log that the rocket is ready for launch: const rocket = {}; Promise.all([ Promise.resolve(rocket).then(addBoosters), Promise.resolve(rocket).then(performGuidanceDiagnostic), Promise.resolve(rocket).then(loadCargo) ]).then(function (results) { console.log(‘Rocket ready for launch’); console.log(results); }); Start your Python web server and open the following link in your browser:http://localhost:8000/. You should see the following output: How it works… Promise.all is similar to Promise.resolve; the arguments are resolved as promises. The difference is that instead of a single result, Promise.all accepts an iterable argument, each member of which is resolved individually. In the preceding example, you can see that each of the promises is initiated immediately. Two of them are able to complete while performGuidanceDiagnostic continues. The promise returned by Promise.all is fulfilled when all the constituent promises have been resolved. The results of the promises are combined into an array and propagated down the chain. You can see that three references to rocket are packed into the results argument. And you can see that the operations of each promise have been performed on the resulting object. There’s more As you may have guessed, the results of the constituent promises don’t have to return the same value. This can be useful, for example, when performing multiple independent network requests. The index of the result for each promise corresponds to the index of the operation within the argument to Promise.all. In these cases, it can be useful to use array destructuring to name the argument of the then callback: Promise.all([ findAstronomers, findAvailableTechnicians, findAvailableEquipment ]).then(function ([astronomers, technicians, equipment]) { // use results for astronomers, technicians, and equipment }); Handling errors with Promise.catch In a previous recipe, we saw how to fulfill a promise with an error state using reject, and we saw that this triggers the next catch callback in the promise chain. Because promises are relatively easy to compose, we need to be able to handle errors that are reported in different ways. Luckily promises are able to handle this seamlessly. In this recipe, we’ll see how Promises.catch can handle errors that are reported by being thrown or through rejection. How to do it… Open your command-line application and navigate to your workspace. Create a new folder named 3-07-handle-errors-promise-catch. Copy or create an index.html that loads and runs a main function from main.js. Create a main.js file with a main function that creates an object named rocket: export function main() { return new Promise(function (resolve) { setTimeout(function () { console.log(‘guidance diagnostic complete’); rocket.guidanceDiagnostic = ‘Completed’; resolve(rocket); }, 2000); }); } Create a function named loadCargo that adds a payload to the cargoBay: function loadCargo (rocket) { console.log(‘loading satellite’); rocket.cargoBay = [{ name: ‘Communication Satellite’ }] return rocket; } Use Promise.resolve to pass the rocket object to these functions within Promise.all: export function main() { console.log(‘Before promise created’); Promise.resolve(Math.random() > 0.5) .then(addBoosters) .then(() => console.log(‘Ready for launch: ‘)) What are Promises in ECMAScript? In earlier versions of JavaScript, the callback pattern was the most common way to organize asynchronous code. It got the job done, but it didn’t scale well. With callbacks, as more asynchronous functions are added, the code becomes more deeply nested, and it becomes more difficult to add to, refactor, and understand the code. This situation is commonly known as callback hell. Promises were introduced to improve on this situation. Promises allow the relationships of asynchronous operations to be rearranged and organized with more freedom and flexibility. In this context, today we will learn about Promises and how to use it to create and organize asynchronous functions. We will also explore how to handle error conditions. Creating and waiting for Promises Promises provide a way to compose and combine asynchronous functions in an organized and easier to read way. This recipe demonstrates a very basic usage of promises. This recipe assumes that you already have a workspace that allows you to create and run ES modules in your browser for all the recipes given below: How to do it… Open your command-line application and navigate to your workspace. Create a new folder named 03-01-creating-and-waiting-for-promises. Copy or create an index.html that loads and runs a main function from main.js. Create a main.js file that creates a promise and logs messages before and after the promise is created, as well as while the promise is executing and after it has been resolved: // main.js export function main () { const rocket = {}; console.log(‘After promise created’); } Create a function named addBoosters that throws an error if its first parameter is false: function addBoosters(shouldFail) { if (shouldFail) { throw new Error(‘Unable to add Boosters’); } console.log(‘After promise created’); } Create a function named addBoosters that creates an object with boosters to an object: function addBoosters (rocket) { console.log(‘attaching boosters’); rocket.boosters = [{ count: 2, fuelType: ‘solid’ }, { count: 1, fuelType: ‘liquid’ }]; return rocket; } Create a function named performGuidanceDiagnostic that returns a promise of a successfully completed task: function performGuidanceDiagnostic (rocket) { console.log(‘performing guidance diagnostic’); center_img console.log(‘After promise created’); } Start your Python web server and open the following link in your browser:http://localhost:8000/. You will see the following output: How it works… By looking at the order of the log messages, you can clearly see the order of operations. First, the initial log is executed. Next, the promise is created with an executor method. The executor method takes resolve as an argument. The resolve function fulfills the promise. Promises adhere to an interface named thenable. This means that we can chain then callbacks. The callback we attached with this method is executed after the resolve function is called. This function executes asynchronously (not immediately after the Promise has been resolved). Finally, there is a log after the promise has been created. The order the logs messages appear reveals the asynchronous nature of the code. All of the logs are seen in the order they appear in the code, except the Finished promise message. That function is executed asynchronously after the main function has exited! Resolving Promise results In the previous recipe, we saw how to use promises to execute asynchronous code. However, this code is pretty basic. It just logs a message and then calls resolve. Often, we want to use asynchronous code to perform some long-running operation, then return that value. This recipe demonstrates how to use resolve in order to return the result of a long-running operation. How to do it… Open your command-line application and navigate to your workspace. Create a new folder named 3-02-resolving-promise-results. Copy or create an index.html that loads and runs a main function from main.js. Create a main.js file that creates a promise and logs messages before and after the promise is created: // main.js export function main () { return { boosters: [{ count: 2, fuelType: ‘solid’ }, { count: 1, fuelType: ‘liquid’ }] }; } Use Promise.resolve to pass a Boolean value that is true if a random number is greater than 0.5 to addBoosters: export function main() { const rocket = {}; Promise.resolve(rocket).then(addBoosters) .catch(console.error); Promise.resolve(rocket).then(performGuidanceDiagnostic) .catch(console.error); console.log(‘After promise created’); } Within the promise, resolve a random number after a 5-second timeout: new Promise(function (resolve) { setTimeout(function () { resolve(Math.random()); }, 5000); }) Chain a then call off the promise. Pass a function that logs out the value of its only argument: new Promise(function (resolve) { setTimeout(function () { resolve(Math.random()); }, 5000); }).then(function (result) { console.log(‘Long running job returned: %s’, result); }); Start your Python web server and open the following link in your browser:http://localhost:8000/. You should see the following output: How it works… Just as in the previous recipe, the promise was not fulfilled until resolve was executed (this time after 5 seconds). This time however, we passed the called resolve immediately with a random number for an argument. When this happens, the argument is provided to the callback for the subsequent then function. We’ll see in future recipes how this can be continued to create promise chains. Rejecting Promise errors In the previous recipe, we saw how to use resolve to provide a result from a successfully fulfilled promise. Unfortunately, the code doesn’t always run as expected. Network connections can be down, data can be corrupted, and uncountable other errors can occur. We need to be able to handle those situations as well. This recipe demonstrates how to use reject when errors arise. How to do it… Open your command-line application and navigate to your workspace. Create a new folder named 3-03-rejecting-promise-errors. Copy or create an index.html that loads and runs a main function from main.js. Create a main.js file that creates a promise, and logs messages before and after the promise is created and when the promise is fulfilled: new Promise(function (resolve) { resolve(); }).then(function (result) { console.log(‘Promise Completed’); }); Add a second argument to the promise callback named reject, and call reject with a new error: new Promise(function (resolve, reject) { reject(new Error(‘Something went wrong’); }).then(function (result) { console.log(‘Promise Completed’); }); Chain a catch call off the promise. Pass a function that logs out its only argument: new Promise(function (resolve, reject) { reject(new Error(‘Something went wrong’); }).then(function (result) { console.log(‘Promise Completed’); }).catch(function (error) { console.error(error); }); Start your Python web server and open the following link in your browser:http://localhost:8000/. You should see the following output: How it works… Previously we saw how to use resolve to return a value in the case of a successful fulfillment of a promise. In this case, we called reject before resolve. This means that the Promise finished with an error before it could resolve. When the Promise completes in an error state, the then callbacks are not executed. Instead we have to use catch in order to receive the error that the Promise rejects. You’ll also notice that the catch callback is only executed after the main function has returned. Like successful fulfillment, listeners to unsuccessful ones execute asynchronously. See also Handle errors with Promise.catch Simulating finally with Promise.then Chaining Promises So far in this article, we’ve seen how to use promises to run single asynchronous tasks. This is helpful but doesn’t provide a significant improvement over the callback pattern. The real advantage that promises offer comes when they are composed. In this recipe, we’ll use promises to combine asynchronous functions in series. How to do it… Open your command-line application and navigate to your workspace. Create a new folder named 3-04-chaining-promises. Copy or create an index.html that loads and runs a main function from main.js. Create a main.js file that creates a promise. Resolve a random number from the promise: new Promise(function (resolve) { resolve(Math.random()); }); ); Chain a then call off of the promise. Return true from the callback if the random value is greater than or equal to 0.5: new Promise(function (resolve, reject) { resolve(Math.random()); }).then(function(value) { return value >= 0.5; }); Chain a final then call after the previous one. Log out a different message if the argument is true or false: new Promise(function (resolve, reject) { resolve(Math.random()); }).then(function (value) { return value >= 0.5; }).then(function (isReadyForLaunch) { if (isReadyForLaunch) { console.log(‘Start the countdown! ‘); } else { console.log(‘Abort the mission. ‘); }}); Start your Python web server and open the following link in your browser:http://localhost:8000/. If you are lucky, you’ll see the following output: If you are unlucky, we’ll see the following output: How it works… We’ve already seen how to use then to wait for the result of a promise. Here, we are doing the same thing multiple times in a row. This is called a promise chain. After the promise chain is started with the new promise, all of the subsequent links in the promise chain return promises as well. That is, the callback of each then function is resolve like another promise. See also Using Promise.all to resolve multiple Promises Handle errors with Promise.catch Simulating finally with a final Promise.then call Starting a Promise chain with Promise.resolve In this article’s preceding recipes, we’ve been creating new promise objects with the constructor. This gets the jobs done, but it creates a problem. The first callback in the promise chain has a different shape than the subsequent callbacks. In the first callback, the arguments are the resolve and reject functions that trigger the subsequent then or catch callbacks. In subsequent callbacks, the returned value is propagated down the chain, and thrown errors are captured by catch callbacks. This difference adds mental overhead. It would be nice to have all of the functions in the chain behave in the same way. In this recipe, we’ll see how to use Promise.resolve to start a promise chain. How to do it… Open your command-line application and navigate to your workspace. Create a new folder named 3-05-starting-with-resolve. Copy or create an index.html that loads and runs a main function from main.js. Create a main.js file that calls Promise.resolve with an empty object as the first argument: export function main () { Promise.resolve({}) } Chain a then call off of resolve, and attach rocket boosters to the passed object: export function main () { Promise.resolve({}).then(function (rocket) { console.log(‘attaching boosters’); rocket.boosters = [{ count: 2, fuelType: ‘solid’ }, { count: 1, fuelType: ‘liquid’ }]; return rocket; })} Add a final then call to the chain that lets you know when the boosters have been added: export function main () { Promise.resolve({}) .then(function (rocket) { console.log(‘attaching boosters’); rocket.boosters = [{ count: 2, fuelType: ‘solid’ }, { count: 1, fuelType: ‘liquid’ }]; return rocket; }) .then(function (rocket) { console.log(‘boosters attached’); console.log(rocket); })} Start your Python web server and open the following link in your browser: http://localhost:8000/. You should see the following output: How it works… Promise.resolve creates a new promise that resolves the value passed to it. The subsequent then method will receive that resolved value as it’s argument. This method can seem a little roundabout but can be very helpful for composing asynchronous functions. In effect, the constituents of the promise chain don’t need to be aware that they are in the chain (including the first step). This makes transitioning from code that doesn’t use promises to code that does much easier. Using Promise.all to resolve multiple promises So far, we’ve seen how to use promises to perform asynchronous operations in sequence. This is useful when the individual steps are long-running operations. However, this might not always be the more efficient configuration. Quite often, we can perform multiple asynchronous operations at the same time. In this recipe, we’ll see how to use Promise.all to start multiple asynchronous operations, without waiting for the previous one to complete. How to do it… Open your command-line application and navigate to your workspace. Create a new folder named 3-06-using-promise-all. Copy or create an index.html that loads and runs a main function from main.js. Create a main.js file that creates an object named rocket, and calls Promise.all with an empty array as the first argument: export function main() { console.log(‘Before promise created’); console.log(‘After promise created’); } Add a then function to the chain that logs a success message: export function main() { console.log(‘Before promise created’); Promise.resolve(Math.random() > 0.5) .then(addBoosters) const rocket = {}; Promise.all([ Promise.resolve(rocket).then(addBoosters), Promise.resolve(rocket).then(performGuidanceDiagnostic), Promise.resolve(rocket).then(loadCargo) ]); console.log(‘After promise created’); } Start your Python web server and open the following link in your browser:http://localhost:8000/. You should see the following output: How it works… As we saw before, when a promise is fulfilled in a rejected state, the callback of the catch functions is triggered. In the preceding recipe, we see that this can happen when the reject method is called (as with performGuidanceDiagnostic). It also happens when a function in the chain throws an error (as will addBoosters). This has similar benefit to how Promise.resolve can normalize asynchronous functions. This handling allows asynchronous functions to not know about the promise chain, and announce error states in a way that is familiar to developers who are new to promises. This makes expanding the use of promises much easier. Simulating finally with the promise API In a previous recipe, we saw how catch can be used to handle errors, whether a promise has rejected, or a callback has thrown an error. Sometimes, it is desirable to execute code whether or not an error state has been detected. In the context of try/catch blocks, the finally block can be used for this purpose. We have to do a little more work to get the same behavior when working with promises In this recipe, we’ll see how a final then call to execute some code in both successful and failing fulfillment states. How to do it… Open your command-line application and navigate to your workspace. Create a new folder named 3-08-simulating-finally. Copy or create an index.html that loads and runs a main function from main.js. Create a main.js file with a main function that logs out messages for before and after promise creation: export function main() { console.log(‘Before promise created’); console.log(‘After promise created’); } Add a catch to the chain and log out the error if thrown: export function main() { console.log(‘Before promise created’); Promise.resolve(Math.random() > 0.5) .then(addBoosters) .then(() => console.log(‘Ready for launch: ‘)) .catch(console.error) console.log(‘After promise created’); } Add a then after the catch, and log out that we need to make an announcement: export function main() { new Promise(function (resolve) { console.log(‘Executing promise’); resolve(); }).then(function () { console.log(‘Finished promise’); }); console.log(‘Before promise created’); Promise.resolve(Math.random() > 0.5) .then(addBoosters) .then(() => console.log(‘Ready for launch: ‘)) .catch(console.error) .then(() => console.log(‘Time to inform the press.’)); console.log(‘After promise created’); } Start your Python web server and open the following link in your browser:http://localhost:8000/. If you are lucky and the boosters are added successfully, you’ll see the following output: 12. If you are unlucky, you’ll see an error message like the following: How it works… We can see in the preceding output that whether or not the asynchronous function completes in an error state, the last then callback is executed. This is possible because the catch method doesn’t stop the promise chain. It simply catches any error states from the previous links in the chain, and then propagates a new value forward. The final then is then protected from being bypassed by an error state by this catch. And so, regardless of the fulfillment state of prior links in the chain, we can be sure that the callback of this final then will be executed. To summarize, we learned how to use the Promise API to organize asynchronous programs. We also looked at how to propagate results through promise chains and handle errors. You read an excerpt from a book written by Ross Harrison, titled ECMAScript Cookbook. It’s a complete guide on how to become a better web programmer by writing efficient and modular code using ES6 and ES8. Read Next: What’s new in ECMAScript 2018 (ES9)? ECMAScript 7 – What to expect? Modular Programming in ECMAScript 6last_img read more

Where do poinsettias come from

first_imgNo related posts. When we think poinsettia, we think Christmas plant. Fewer of us think about Central America or Mexico, but actually, that’s where poinsettias come from, despite the fact that they are now found around the world as a leading ornamental, particularly over the holidays.Poinsettias bloom during this time of the year, when the days are shortest, which is convenient, given their status in the world of gifts. They’re mainly grown as potted plants, however, in the tropics, gardeners can plant poinsettias outside, where they grow into shrubs. Most of us are familiar with poinsettia flowers, which if you look closely, are actually brightly red colored leaves that surround a group of small yellow flowers. Nurseries offer different varieties of poinsettia (known as pastora or buena noche in Spanish) as potted plants or gardeners can propagate new plants using stem cuttings about 10-15 centimeters long, taken from mature plants. These cuttings should be planted in sandy loam potting soil in containers, which are placed in a shady area and watered weekly to prevent them from drying out. When the cuttings begin to sprout new foliage, they can be moved into the sunlight.Later, when the plants are well established, they can be transplanted to larger pots, planter boxes or directly outside. These plants flower best in full sunlight and well-drained soil fortified with compost fertilizer. After a year of growth, trim the plants back after blooming to keep them compact.Small insects such as scales, mites and thrips may attack the foliage, but can be controlled with soapy solution sprays.For more information on tropical gardening, naturally, contact us at thenewdawncenter@yahoo.com or see our newsletter at http://thenewdawncenter.info/blog.html. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Feria Verde has a new spot at Ciudad Colóns Old Market

first_img Facebook Comments Related posts:An arugula-growing farmer feeds a culinary revolution in Cuba San José hosts international short film fest 10 can’t-miss events this Halloween in Costa Rica Mexico opens landmark debate on marijuana laws Francisco Chaves, owner of Santé Raw Superfoods. Alberto Font/The Tico TimesOur final stop at the Feria Verde was at the Café Verde Pura Vida stand owned by Silvio Bonomelli, of Italy.“We are part of the innovation of a product that creates change, one cup of coffee at a time,” Bonomelli told The Tico Times.The Feria Verde takes place every Tuesday from 3-8 pm, and on Saturdays at the Polideportivo in Barrio Aranjuez, in eastern San José, from 7 am-1 pm. For more information visit Feria Verde’s webpage.center_img The beautiful scenery of the Old Market in Ciudad Colón, west of San José, is home to new edition of the Feria Verde. Every Tuesday from 3 to 8 pm, the organic food community reunites in this lovely cultural space. The Tico Times visited the Feria Verde and encountered a wide variety of people who love the organic lifestyle.The Feria Verde is organized by the Asociación de Amantes de lo Orgánico (AAMOR) and first kicked off at the Polideportivo in Barrio Aranjuez, just east of the San José city center, in 2010. The organizers of this fair are Francisco Grau, Susana González, Manuel Oviedo and Faviana Scorza. This Ciudad Colón edition was inaugurated on July 29 of this year.“An interdisciplinary group of people who wanted a space in San José that enabled both the sale of products and foods for a healthy lifestyle and cultural environment, got together,” Manuel Oviedo explained to The Tico Times, referring to the initial impulse behind the Feria Verde. The new Feria Verde in Ciudad Colón. Alberto Font/The Tico TimesAAMOR seeks to establish various points of sale for organic products across the country.“On the West side of San José we searched for a place in which there was consumer. Happily, we came across this place,” said Oviedo.As we strolled down the aisles of the market, we came across the booth of Finca Orgánica Tierra de Sueños. This farm from Zarcero, northwest of the capital, is owned by Brayner Paniagua and sells all sorts of organic vegetables such as lettuce, cabbage, and carrots.The enthusiastic Daniela Quesada, saleswoman for Ninfa Products produced by Virginia Delbino, happily discussed her dehydrated fruit snack mix.“The mix is made of banana and cocoa. The secret behind this snack is to eat it all together in order for the flavors to do their magic!” Quesada said joyfully. (A taste test proved that she was right.)The Keep it Green Farms stand was right in front and caught our attention quickly. Javier Pelegero Dada offered us his delicious palmito and pejibayes.“Our products are cooked, then preserved in salt and water. We have various products with different shapes, sizes, and flavors: palmito with chili, palmito without chili, and our pejibayes,” Pelegero explained. Carlos Peleguero from Keep it Green sells pejibayes and hearts of palm at the Feria Verde in Ciudad Colón. Alberto Font/The Tico TimesSusana Vargas, owner of La Carambola’s, shared with us her delightful vegan aioli, served alongside the Keep it Green Farms pejibayes. La Carambola offers an exotic vegan sauce line.“The ingredients all come from the [Feria Verde]. I purchase the ingredients from the farmers here and then I process all the products,” Vargas explained.Pan Jaguar was our next stop. Esteban Chavarría, alias Jaguar, is the owner and producer of this delicious bread. His line includes a varied range of flavored breads including rosemary basil, sunflower seeds with ground flaxseed, nuts with ground flaxseed, raisins, and onion and sweet pepper with basil. Jaguar recited his business slogan, “Pan Jaguar, en su hogar no debe faltar. Si a sus vecinos quiere impresionar, pan jaguar debe llevar” (“Your home can’t be without Jaguar Bread. If you want to impress your neighbors, take some with you.”) Esteban Chavarría, alias “Jaguar,” makes Pan Jaguar. Alberto Font/The Tico TimesNext to Pan Jaguar was Francisco Chaves, Santé Raw Superfoods owner. His star products are three delicious snack bars: a protein bar with cashews, maca, cocoa, and dates; a potassium bar with cocoa, chia seeds, walnut, flaxseed, sunflower seeds, dates and coconut oil; and a mineral bar with spirulina, oats, walnuts, dates, and coconut oil.“These are raw food products made with the dehydration technique and organic ingredients,” Chaves explained.Our next stop was Biobella, a natural cosmetic line owned by Bob Hara and Monika Bingen.“These are naturally therapeutic cosmetics. We have sunblock, a great variety of scrubs, lip balm, facial products, deodorant, and foot cream. In the natural makeup line we have 16 different eyeshadow shades and 5 different eyeliner shades,” Bingen explained. All of Biobella’s products are handcrafted.last_img read more

Turkey to soon request Patriots from NATO

first_imgANKARA, Turkey (AP) – Turkey’s foreign minister says his country will soon make a formal request to NATO for Patriot missiles to bolster anti-aircraft defenses along its border with Syria.Ahmet Davutoglu told reporters Tuesday that talks with Turkey’s allies on this possible deployment have reached the “final stage.”He said: “The formal negotiations will be concluded at the shortest time possible. They won’t last much longer.” Sponsored Stories Top Stories 4 sleep positions for men and what they mean NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said Monday in Brussels that NATO would consider Turkey’s request as a matter of urgency. He said NATO has drawn up plans to defend Turkey.NATO installed anti-aircraft batteries in Turkey during the 1991 and 2003 Iraq wars. They were never used and later removed.Within the alliance, only the United States, Germany and the Netherlands have Patriots in their arsenals.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenixcenter_img Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Day Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion project How Arizona is preparing the leader of the next generation Comments   Share   How do cataracts affect your vision?last_img read more